39

I want to do is run ruby sayhello.rb on the command line, then receive Hello from Rspec.

I've got that with this:

class Hello
  def speak
    puts 'Hello from RSpec'
  end
end

hi = Hello.new #brings my object into existence
hi.speak

Now I want to write a test in rspec to check that the command line output is in fact "Hello from RSpec" and not "I like Unix"

NOT WORKING. I currently have this in my sayhello_spec.rb file

require_relative 'sayhello.rb' #points to file so I can 'see' it

describe "sayhello.rb" do
  it "should say 'Hello from Rspec' when ran" do        
    STDOUT.should_receive(:puts).with('Hello from RSpec')    
  end
end

Also, I need to actually see what the test should look like in my RSPEC please.

5 Answers 5

39

I think the best way is to use rspec build in output matcher https://www.relishapp.com/rspec/rspec-expectations/docs/built-in-matchers/output-matcher

Fore example, this is your class

class MakeIt
  def awesome(text)
    puts "Awesome #{text}"
  end
end

and your test

describe MakeIt do
  describe '#awesome' do
    it 'prints awesome things' do
      expect do
        MakeIt.new.awesome('tests')
      end.to output('Awesome tests').to_stdout
    end

    it 'does not print not awesome things' do
      expect do
        MakeIt.new.awesome('tests')
      end.to_not output('Not awesome tests').to_stdout
    end
  end
end

Nice, clean and by the book!

2
  • 2
    Do you know if there is any way of doing it with contains instead of an exact the same? Jun 12, 2019 at 14:48
  • 5
    @AlexandreAmadodeCastro a bit late, but you can use expect(...).to output(a_string_including('xxx')).to_stdout see this cheatsheet Jun 12, 2020 at 12:54
17

You're executing your code before entering the test block, so the expectations are not being met. You need to run the code within the test block after setting expectations (e.g. by moving the require_relative statement after the STDOUT.... statement), as follows:

describe "sayhello.rb" do
  it "should say 'Hello from Rspec' when ran" do        
    STDOUT.should_receive(:puts).with('Hello from RSpec')
    require_relative 'sayhello.rb' #load/run the file 
  end
end
2
  • 1
    RSpec doesn't need to know about (i.e. access) the code in sayhello.rb. The spec is simply putting an expectation on STDOUT.puts which is built into Ruby. The expectation is met after sayhello.rb is loaded and run (i.e. required). Jan 4, 2014 at 21:11
  • 5
    This is the same expectation with the new RSpec syntax: expect(STDOUT).to receive(:puts).with("Hello from RSpec")
    – Jankeesvw
    Mar 23, 2015 at 14:24
16

Based on previous answers/comments, a solution using the new syntax without a gem would look like this:

describe "sayhello.rb" do
  it "should say 'Hello from Rspec' when run" do        
    expect(STDOUT).to receive(:puts).with('Hello from RSpec')
    require_relative 'sayhello.rb'  # load/run the file 
  end
end
12

You can solve this using Rails' active_support library, which adds a capture method:

require 'active_support/core_ext/kernel/reporting'
require_relative 'sayhello'

describe Hello do
  it "says 'Hello from RSpec' when ran" do
    output = capture(:stdout) do
      hi = Hello.new
      hi.speak
    end
    expect(output).to include 'Hello from RSpec'
  end
end
1
3

Somewhat similar to bswinnerton's answer, one can capture puts output and then test against the captured output, without having to use the library-dependent capture method (which someone has mentioned is being deprecated in Rails 5).

Ruby has a global variable named $stdout which by default is populated by the constant STDOUT. STDOUT is that which sends data to the ruby process's stdout stream (not sure if "stream" is the right term here). Basically in a naive case STDOUT.puts("foo") will result in "foo\n" appearing in your terminal window. $stdout.puts("foo") will do the same thing because the $stdout variable name refers to STDOUT unless you reassign it (key point here). Finally puts("foo") is syntactic sugar for $stdout.puts("foo").

The strategy then is to reassign $stdout to a local IO instance which you can inspect after running your code, to see if "Hello from RSpec" showed up in its contents.

How this would work:

describe "sayhello.rb" do
  it "should say 'Hello from Rspec' when ran" do        
    $stdout = StringIO.new

    # run the code
    # (a little funky; would prefer Hello.new.speak here but only changing one thing at a time)
    require_relative 'sayhello.rb' 

    $stdout.rewind   # IOs act like a tape so we gotta rewind before we play it back  

    expect($stdout.gets.strip).to eq('Hello from Rspec')
  end
end
2
  • Can this method be used to check for multiple stdout messages? (in comparison the the other answers which check for one)
    – matrim_c
    Feb 19, 2016 at 16:32
  • 2
    @matrim_c: I know it's late for you but answering this for anyone else who comes here. Yes you can use this to test for multiple stdout messages. The StringIO object acts like a file, with multiple lines. gets is a command to read a single line (including the newline character \n), then move the read head to the first character of the next line. Calling gets multiple times will yield the lines in order they were added with puts. Calling read on the StringIO will give you the entire contents, including the \n characters between the lines. Jan 29, 2017 at 0:41

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