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I am trying to create a database where each customer has several orders(new orders daily) and each order has several items. I had planned creating a table of customers and creating a table per order and populating this table with an "items" table. I think this approach is too complicated and cumbersome since the number of orders can reach the thousands, I don't think having thousands of tables is maintainable. What do you think would be an appropriate structure for this? Any help is greatly appreciated.

Sorry if this is a noobish question, I am learning to program. And this is my first ever attempt at database design.

3
  • 1
    If you're a beginner you should probably first try to set up an ERM. Everything else should just be derived from that. Jul 17 '13 at 22:26
  • 3
    Think of tables as where you store similar types of things, Orders belong in one table because the same kinds of information will be kept about each one. If ever you find yourself thinking you'd have multiple tables with the same structure, you should stop and think about your design. There are plenty of good resources and samples, look for 'sample order database' or 'sample db schema'.
    – Hart CO
    Jul 17 '13 at 22:34
  • @GoatCO Thanks for the tip on what not to do! Yes, I really thought the idea of having a table per order was pretty awful, but it was one of the best ideas that popped into my mind.
    – edferda
    Jul 18 '13 at 0:59
61

You need four tables, something like this:

Possible Simplified Database Model

Customers

Contains a list of customers. One row per Customer. Would contain all the customer's information - their contact details, etc...

Orders

Contains a list of orders. One row per order. Each order is placed by a customer and has a Customer_ID - which can be used to link back to the customer record. Might also store the delivery address, if different from the customers address from their record - or store addresses in separate tables.

OrderItems

Contains a list of order items. One row for each item on an order - so each Order can generate multiple rows in this table. Each item ordered is a product from your inventory, so each row has a product_id, which links to the products table.

Products

Contains a list of products. One row per product. Similar to the customers table, but for products - contains all the product details.

Here's the SQL code that you could use to create this structure - it will create a database for itself called mydb:

CREATE SCHEMA IF NOT EXISTS `mydb` DEFAULT CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_general_ci ;
USE `mydb` ;

-- -----------------------------------------------------
-- Table `mydb`.`Customers`
-- -----------------------------------------------------
CREATE  TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `mydb`.`Customers` (
  `ID` INT NOT NULL ,
  `Name` TEXT NOT NULL ,
  `PhoneNo` VARCHAR(45) NULL ,
  PRIMARY KEY (`ID`) )
ENGINE = InnoDB;


-- -----------------------------------------------------
-- Table `mydb`.`Orders`
-- -----------------------------------------------------
CREATE  TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `mydb`.`Orders` (
  `ID` INT NOT NULL ,
  `customer_id` INT NULL ,
  PRIMARY KEY (`ID`) ,
  INDEX `fk_Order_1_idx` (`customer_id` ASC) ,
  CONSTRAINT `fk_Order_1`
    FOREIGN KEY (`customer_id` )
    REFERENCES `mydb`.`Customers` (`ID` )
    ON DELETE NO ACTION
    ON UPDATE NO ACTION)
ENGINE = InnoDB;


-- -----------------------------------------------------
-- Table `mydb`.`Products`
-- -----------------------------------------------------
CREATE  TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `mydb`.`Products` (
  `ID` INT NOT NULL ,
  `Name` VARCHAR(45) NOT NULL ,
  `Description` TEXT NULL ,
  PRIMARY KEY (`ID`) )
ENGINE = InnoDB;


-- -----------------------------------------------------
-- Table `mydb`.`OrderItems`
-- -----------------------------------------------------
CREATE  TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `mydb`.`OrderItems` (
  `ID` INT NOT NULL ,
  `Order_ID` INT NOT NULL ,
  `Product_ID` INT NOT NULL ,
  `Quantity` INT NOT NULL ,
  PRIMARY KEY (`ID`) ,
  INDEX `fk_OrderItem_1_idx` (`Order_ID` ASC) ,
  INDEX `fk_OrderItem_2_idx` (`Product_ID` ASC) ,
  CONSTRAINT `fk_OrderItem_1`
    FOREIGN KEY (`Order_ID` )
    REFERENCES `mydb`.`Orders` (`ID` )
    ON DELETE NO ACTION
    ON UPDATE NO ACTION,
  CONSTRAINT `fk_OrderItem_2`
    FOREIGN KEY (`Product_ID` )
    REFERENCES `mydb`.`Products` (`ID` )
    ON DELETE NO ACTION
    ON UPDATE NO ACTION)
ENGINE = InnoDB;

USE `mydb` ;
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  • 1
    @HartCO Wouldn't that be the same thing as the Product table in the answer?
    – eabates
    Aug 9 '16 at 13:29
  • May I ask what tool was used to visualise this?
    – Robin
    May 20 '17 at 13:19
  • @Robin It's the standard thing that comes with mysql, not sure what it's called. It's an optional download, but available from the same place. May 21 '17 at 20:24
  • 1
    @bteague To add a payments table would just be more of the same. A table called payments, with an ID, a customer_id, and an order_id (if you want to tie a payment to an order), an amount - and any other information you want to collect about the payment. Aug 22 '18 at 19:51
  • 2
    Would just like to add that Order is a reserved word. So if anyone decides to borrow this and tries to interact with the table, they need to use back ticks otherwise mysql will return an error. For example desc Order will fail, but desc `Order` won't.
    – Dan
    Feb 23 '19 at 3:14
7

There's no sense in creating a table per order. Don't do that. It's not practical, not maintainable. You won't be able to normally query your data. For starters all you need just four tables like this

  • customers
  • orders
  • order_items
  • products (or items)

Here is oversimplified SQLFiddle demo

3
  • One question (I don't know much about Relational database): If we have to search orders of a particular customer. Do we have to scan entire orders table for that?
    – abhiarora
    Jul 30 at 8:26
  • 1
    You don't if you have an index on the customer column in the orders table.
    – peterm
    Jul 31 at 16:31
  • Gotcha. Just got to know about index.
    – abhiarora
    Jul 31 at 16:51
0

I'd have something like a customer table along with orders and items tables. The primary key of customer is the foreign key of order. Items will then have a foreign key that matches the order it was placed on.

3 tables should be fine

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