172

I have a SQL Server table in Entity Framework named employ with a single key column named ID.

How do I delete a single record from the table using Entity Framework?

  • 1
    db.employ.Remove(db.employ.Find(ID1)) – Carter Medlin Dec 1 '16 at 19:17
  • 1
    @CarterMedlin - while that will work, those are two database hits: one SELECT and one DELETE. Most people find that extremely wasteful, especially since select will probably take significantly more time than a delete. – Davor Jul 4 '17 at 13:48
  • I would not suggest to use entity framework Remove or RemoveRange due to the performance issues. I would rather just use something super simple as following: var sql = "DELETE FROM YOUR_TABLE WHERE YOUR_FIELD= @your_parameter"; this.your_context.Database.ExecuteSqlCommand(sql, new SqlParameter("@your_parameter", yourParameter)); – curiousBoy Apr 24 '18 at 0:44
  • 1
    @curiousBoy I think that when you execute statements like you suggested, the EF6 cache doesn't reflect the change. – Yitzchak Jul 8 '18 at 10:09

12 Answers 12

325

It's not necessary to query the object first, you can attach it to the context by its id. Like this:

var employer = new Employ { Id = 1 };
ctx.Employ.Attach(employer);
ctx.Employ.Remove(employer);
ctx.SaveChanges();

Alternatively, you can set the attached entry's state to deleted :

var employer = new Employ { Id = 1 };
ctx.Entry(employer).State = EntityState.Deleted;
ctx.SaveChanges();
  • 79
    Alternatively, ctx.Entry(employer).State = EntityState.Deleted – Simon Belanger Jul 18 '13 at 12:44
  • 12
    this will only work if the relationships are defined as delete cascade. otherwise the code above will fail on an FK exception. – baruchl Sep 29 '14 at 19:08
  • 5
    @mt_serg, I'm looking 3 steps ahead. when was the last time you really had to remove such a simple record from the DB? usually you are dealing with more complex records that include FK relations. hence my comment. – baruchl Sep 30 '14 at 18:46
  • 2
    @IanWarburton The 2nd and 3rd line (Attach and Remove) – Simon Belanger May 25 '16 at 11:22
  • 2
    @PaulZahra: sometimes you have a list of IDs from some other query or source, and you need to delete one. Rather than loading up the objects just to delete them, this way you can delete by ID. You know, that's how the DELETE statement works in SQL normally. – siride Jul 11 '16 at 18:18
73

You can use SingleOrDefault to get a single object matching your criteria, and then pass that to the Remove method of your EF table.

var itemToRemove = Context.Employ.SingleOrDefault(x => x.id == 1); //returns a single item.

if (itemToRemove != null) {
    Context.Employ.Remove(itemToRemove);
    Context.SaveChanges();
}
  • 3
    this is not good way, because you are select all field from database! – Ali Yousefi May 12 '16 at 5:31
  • 2
    This is the way I do it. – Jack Fairfield Aug 31 '16 at 20:22
  • @JackFairfield checkout the accepted answer. There is no need to hit the database and retrieve data. EF only looks at the Id of the object being deleted anyway. – Chazt3n Dec 27 '16 at 23:34
  • 4
    @Ali, Jack - But I think this is preferable because it first checks if the data you are trying to delete actually exists which can prevent any trouble. The accepted answer has no check as such. – Michael Philips Mar 20 '17 at 7:31
  • 4
    This is the better way. Think about it. What if John Smith is trying to remove an item with an id = 1 that Susie Smith removed 30 seconds ago but John doesn't know? You need to hit the database in that case. – Yusha Jan 9 '18 at 17:47
13
  var stud = (from s1 in entities.Students
            where s1.ID== student.ID
            select s1).SingleOrDefault();

  //Delete it from memory
  entities.DeleteObject(stud);
  //Save to database
  entities.SaveChanges();
  • 1
    FirstOrDefault is dangerous. Either you know there's only one (so use SingleOrDefault), or there is more than one, and it should be done in a loop. – Mark Sowul Feb 6 '18 at 19:36
8
Employer employer = context.Employers.First(x => x.EmployerId == 1);

context.Customers.DeleteObject(employer);
context.SaveChanges();
  • Does this protect if there is no object with Id 1? Wouldn't it throw an exception? – Jack Fairfield Aug 31 '16 at 20:22
  • @JackFairfield i think you should check for null object. and according to it perform remove. – Jawand Singh Apr 7 '17 at 13:38
  • First is dangerous. Either you know there's only one (so use Single), or there is more than one, and it should be done in a loop. – Mark Sowul Feb 6 '18 at 19:34
5

I am using entity framework with LINQ. Following code was helpful for me;

1- For multiple records

 using (var dbContext = new Chat_ServerEntities())
 {
     var allRec= dbContext.myEntities;
     dbContext.myEntities.RemoveRange(allRec);
     dbContext.SaveChanges();
 }

2- For Single record

 using (var dbContext = new Chat_ServerEntities())
 {
     var singleRec = dbContext.ChatUserConnections.FirstOrDefault( x => x.ID ==1);// object your want to delete
     dbContext.ChatUserConnections.Remove(singleRec);
     dbContext.SaveChanges();
 }
  • For Single record why not use SingleOrDefault instead of FirstOrDefault? – Mark Sowul Feb 6 '18 at 19:35
  • Whenever you use SingleOrDefault, you clearly state that the query should result in at most a single result. On the other hand, when FirstOrDefault is used, the query can return any amount of results but you state that you only want the first one stackoverflow.com/a/1745716/3131402 – Baqer Naqvi Feb 7 '18 at 10:47
  • 1
    Yes, so why would it be correct to delete an arbitrary record, if there is more than one? Particularly in this case the id is the key, so there should be one: if there is more than one, it is a bug (which Single would detect) – Mark Sowul Feb 7 '18 at 14:56
  • @MarkSowul you are right. I have edited the answer to use FirstOrDefault. – Baqer Naqvi Feb 7 '18 at 15:39
  • @BaqerNaqvi RemoveRange is terrible way to remove entity from the performance perspective.. Especially when your entity is heavy with all the navigational properties by foreign keys. I would rather use var sql = "DELETE FROM YOUR_TABLE WHERE YOUR_FIELD= @your_parameter"; this.your_context.Database.ExecuteSqlCommand(sql, new SqlParameter("@your_parameter", yourParameter)); – curiousBoy Apr 24 '18 at 0:43
1

More generic approuch

public virtual void Delete<T>(int id) where T : BaseEntity, new()
{
    T instance = Activator.CreateInstance<T>();
    instance.Id = id;
    if (dbContext.Entry<T>(entity).State == EntityState.Detached)
    {
        dbContext.Set<T>().Attach(entity);
    }

    dbContext.Set<T>().Remove(entity);
}
1
    [HttpPost]
    public JsonResult DeleteCotnact(int id)
    {
        using (MycasedbEntities dbde = new MycasedbEntities())
        {
            Contact rowcontact = (from c in dbde.Contact
                                     where c.Id == id
                                     select c).FirstOrDefault();

            dbde.Contact.Remove(rowcontact);
            dbde.SaveChanges();

            return Json(id);
        }
    }

What do you think of this, simple or not, you could also try this:

        var productrow = cnn.Product.Find(id);
        cnn.Product.Remove(productrow);
        cnn.SaveChanges();
1

u can do it simply like this

   public ActionResult Delete(int? id)
    {
        using (var db = new RegistrationEntities())
        {
            Models.RegisterTable Obj = new Models.RegisterTable();
            Registration.DAL.RegisterDbTable personalDetail = db.RegisterDbTable.Find(id);
            if (personalDetail == null)
            {
                return HttpNotFound();
            }
            else
            {
                Obj.UserID = personalDetail.UserID;
                Obj.FirstName = personalDetail.FName;
                Obj.LastName = personalDetail.LName;
                Obj.City = personalDetail.City;

            }
            return View(Obj);
        }
    }


    [HttpPost, ActionName("Delete")]

    public ActionResult DeleteConfirmed(int? id)
    {
        using (var db = new RegistrationEntities())
        {
            Registration.DAL.RegisterDbTable personalDetail = db.RegisterDbTable.Find(id);
            db.RegisterDbTable.Remove(personalDetail);
            db.SaveChanges();
            return RedirectToAction("where u want it to redirect");
        }
    }

model

 public class RegisterTable
{

    public int UserID
    { get; set; }


    public string FirstName
    { get; set; }


    public string LastName
    { get; set; }


    public string Password
    { get; set; }


    public string City
    { get; set; }

} 

view from which u will call it

 <table class="table">
    <tr>
        <th>
            FirstName
        </th>
        <th>
            LastName
        </th>

        <th>
            City
        </th>
        <th></th>
    </tr>

    @foreach (var item in Model)
    {
        <tr>
            <td> @item.FirstName </td>
            <td> @item.LastName </td>
            <td> @item.City</td>
            <td>
                <a href="@Url.Action("Edit", "Registeration", new { id = item.UserID })">Edit</a> |
                <a href="@Url.Action("Details", "Registeration", new { id = item.UserID })">Details</a> |
                <a href="@Url.Action("Delete", "Registeration", new { id = item.UserID })">Delete</a>

            </td>
        </tr>

    }

</table>

i hope this will be easy for u to understand

1

With Entity Framework 6, you can use Remove. Also it 's a good tactic to use using for being sure that your connection is closed.

using (var context = new EmployDbContext())
{
    Employ emp = context.Employ.Where(x => x.Id == id).Single<Employ>();
    context.Employ.Remove(emp);
    context.SaveChanges();
}
0

For generic DAO my work finnaly this:

    public void Detele(T entity)
    {
        db.Entry(entity).State = EntityState.Deleted;
        db.SaveChanges();
    }
0

Using EntityFramework.Plus could be an option:

dbContext.Employ.Where(e => e.Id == 1).Delete();

More examples are available here

0

You can do something like this in your click or celldoubleclick event of your grid(if you used one)

if(dgEmp.CurrentRow.Index != -1)
 {
    employ.Id = (Int32)dgEmp.CurrentRow.Cells["Id"].Value;
    //Some other stuff here
 }

Then do something like this in your Delete Button:

using(Context context = new Context())
{
     var entry = context.Entry(employ);
     if(entry.State == EntityState.Detached)
     {
        //Attached it since the record is already being tracked
        context.Employee.Attach(employ);
     }                             
     //Use Remove method to remove it virtually from the memory               
     context.Employee.Remove(employ);
     //Finally, execute SaveChanges method to finalized the delete command 
     //to the actual table
     context.SaveChanges();

     //Some stuff here
}

Alternatively, you can use a LINQ Query instead of using LINQ To Entities Query:

var query = (from emp in db.Employee
where emp.Id == employ.Id
select emp).Single();

employ.Id is used as filtering parameter which was already passed from the CellDoubleClick Event of your DataGridView.

  • The Idea behind the code is you wire the id(employ.Id) of the record you want to delete to the model(Employee Class) and then attach it to the actual Table from the Context then execute in-memory Remove() Method then finally execute actual saving to the database using SaveChanges() Method. Though the LINQ Query also works fine but I don't like the idea of querying to the table just to get the id of the record. – arvin aquio Dec 21 '18 at 5:53

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