55

I have a string: "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dogs."

I want to use javascript (possibly with jQuery) to insert a character every n characters. For example I want to call:

var s = "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dogs.";
var new_s = UpdateString("$",5);
// new_s should equal "The q$uick $brown$ fox $jumps$ over$ the $lazy $dogs.$"

The goal is to use this function to insert &shy into long strings to allow them to wrap. Maybe someone knows of a better way?

  • You're better off letting the browser wrap text. Do you have long sentences like you used for your example above, or long words? – Dan Herbert Nov 20 '09 at 20:10
  • 1
    The browser won't wrap within a word, I have long words like "ThisIsAStupidLabelThatOneOfMyUsersWillTryToMakeInMyApplication" – brendan Nov 20 '09 at 20:15
  • Wouldn't a server side solution to break words into a maximum of n characters would be better? – Pool Nov 20 '09 at 20:19
  • Possibly, but a client side solution is more easily implemented for my current predicament. – brendan Nov 20 '09 at 20:26
60
function chunk(str, n) {
    var ret = [];
    var i;
    var len;

    for(i = 0, len = str.length; i < len; i += n) {
       ret.push(str.substr(i, n))
    }

    return ret
};

chunk("The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dogs.", 5).join('$');
// "The q$uick $brown$ fox $jumps$ over$ the $lazy $dogs."
  • 6
    +1 but your semi-colons are a bit on and off ;) – Andy E Nov 20 '09 at 21:51
  • @Andy E: heh, they're optional just before a closing }. I don't even realize I do that anymore. It's born from a "must conserve every byte" mentality from years before js compressors became standard ;) – Crescent Fresh Nov 20 '09 at 23:05
  • String.split("") & Array.form() – user8202629 Aug 30 '17 at 2:47
  • regex & string.split() & array.form() & slice() & map() & JSON.parse() – user8202629 Aug 30 '17 at 2:58
135

With regex

"The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dogs.".replace(/(.{5})/g,"$1$")

The q$uick $brown$ fox $jumps$ over$ the $lazy $dogs.$

cheers,

  • 9
    Damn it! Nice regex-fu there. BTW is the last $ needed in the replacement string? – Crescent Fresh Nov 20 '09 at 20:25
  • 2
    The last $ in the replacement string is not needed, you can put what ever you want to put at the 5 space interval here, like <br> for instance. – skymook May 17 '11 at 16:42
  • 5
    I arrived at "string".replace(/.{5}/g, "$&" + "<br>");. The concatenation at the end is just to make it easier to read. $& in the replacement matches the matched string, so no grouping is required. – matpie Mar 19 '14 at 22:49
  • This is a beautiful solution! thank you @YOU – Andrew Odendaal Apr 10 '14 at 13:55
  • 3
    How would that work when counting from the end of the string? – philk Jun 7 '14 at 12:29
6

Keep it simple

  var str = "123456789";
  var chuncks = str.match(/.{1,3}/g);
  var new_value = chuncks.join("-"); //returns 123-456-789
  • what in case I have a ten letter number and I want to have the '-' after 3rd and 6th letter only! and NOT the 9th letter. – Learner Sep 15 '18 at 1:52
  • @Learner remove the last "-" using regex. – Kareem Sep 15 '18 at 3:23
  • Can you share? Thanks in advance. – Learner Sep 15 '18 at 3:56
  • "123-456-789-0".replace(/-([^-]+)$/, '$1'); //remove last dash – Kareem Sep 16 '18 at 3:35
2
var str="ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQR";
function formatStr(str, n) {
   var a = [], start=0;
   while(start<str.length) {
      a.push(str.slice(start, start+n));
      start+=n;
   }
   console.log(a.join(" "));
}
formatStr(str,3);
  • Try to explain your answer – Coder Mar 10 '17 at 16:36
1
let s = 'The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dogs.';
s.split('').reduce((a, e, i)=> a + e + (i % 5 === 4 ? '$' : ''), '');

Explain: split('') turns a string into an array. Now we want to turn the array back to one single string. Reduce is perfect in this scenario. Array's reduce function takes 3 parameters, first is the accumulator, second is the iterated element, and the third is the index. Since the array index is 0 based, to insert after 5th, we are looking at index i%5 === 4.

1

Sometime you also want to start inserting characters from the end of the string to the beginning. In that case this may do:

function insert_spaces(string, space_every_nr, reverse, character) {
var insert_string = string.toString();

if (reverse == true) {
    var insert_string = string.toString();
    var length_of_string=string.length;
    var count=0;
    for (var i = 0; i < string.length+count; i+=space_every_nr) {
        insert_string=insert_string.substring(0,i)+character+insert_string.substring(i ,(string.length+count));
        count++;
    }
    return insert_string
} else if(reverse ==false) {
    var count=0;
    var j=0;
    for (var i = string.length; i > 0; i -= space_every_nr) {
        insert_string=insert_string.substring(0,i)+character+insert_string.substring(i ,(string.length+count));
        count++;
    }
    return insert_string;
  }
}
1
function addItemEvery (str, item, every){
  for(let i = 0; i < str.length; i++){
    if(!(i % (every + 1))){
      str = str.substring(0, i) + item + str.substring(i);
    }
   }
  return str.substring(1);
}

Result:

> addItemEvery("The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dogs.", '$', 5)
> "The q$uick $brown$ fox $jumps$ over$ the $lazy $dogs."

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