39

I've been searching for a good trick to make a Hide/Show content or a list with only CSS and no javascript. I've managed to make this action:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<head>

   <style>
      #cont {display: none; }
      .show:focus + .hide {display: inline; }
      .show:focus + .hide + #cont {display: block;}
   </style>

</head>
<body>

   <div>
        <a href="#show"class="show">[Show]</a>
        <a href="#hide"class="hide">/ [Hide]</a>
        <div id="cont">Content</div>
   </div>

</body>
</html>

Demo here: http://jsfiddle.net/6W7XD/ And it's working but not as it should. Here is the problem: When the content is shown, you can hide it by clicking "anywhere on the page". How to disable that? how to hide content "only" by clicking hide? Thank you in advance!

  • 1
    Behavior is supposed to only exist in the realm of JavaScript. – cimmanon Jul 18 '13 at 18:55
  • 3
    that's why I'm here! to suppose it in CSS3 too! no need for javascript! let's hope for that! ;) – Frederic Kizar Jul 18 '13 at 20:52

12 Answers 12

35

I wouldn't use checkboxes, i'd use the code you already have

DEMO http://jsfiddle.net/6W7XD/1/

CSS

body {
  display: block;
}
.span3:focus ~ .alert {
  display: none;
}
.span2:focus ~ .alert {
  display: block;
}
.alert{display:none;}

HTML

<span class="span3">Hide Me</span>
<span class="span2">Show Me</span>
<p class="alert" >Some alarming information here</p>

This way the text is only hidden on click of the hide element

| improve this answer | |
  • Good tip. But it would be great if the text was hidden first. In this order: To Show it, then hide it. – Frederic Kizar Jul 18 '13 at 20:33
  • I've just added this .alert{display:none;} and it worked fine. but when I add some others, it goes messy: jsfiddle.net/6W7XD/12 thx anyway – Frederic Kizar Jul 18 '13 at 21:00
  • 5
    As soon as the focus moves to anything other than either one of the SPANs, the display settings change back. So if the user needs to click on content, the content will change. – Alan Wells Jul 9 '14 at 0:54
  • 2
    In Chrome 48.0.2564.22 dev-m, Once 'Hide Me' is clicked, as soon as it loses focus (ie: clicking anywhere else), the content is again hidden. Not a good idea to rely on focus as it's finicky on different OS's, virtual machines, etc. – JeremyFelix Dec 4 '15 at 11:46
  • 2
    For anyone not getting this to work right off the bat - make sure your focusable element has tabindex attribute set. – Nino Škopac Mar 15 '18 at 9:19
22

This is going to blow your mind: Hidden radio buttons.

input#show, input#hide {
    display:none;
}

span#content {
    display:none;
}
input#show:checked ~ span#content {
  display:block;
}

input#hide:checked ~ span#content {
    display:none;
}
<label for="show">
    <span>[Show]</span>
</label>
<input type=radio id="show" name="group">
<label for="hide">
    <span>[Hide]</span> 
</label>    
<input type=radio id="hide" name="group">
<span id="content">Content</span>

| improve this answer | |
  • Are you sure it's working? not working for me though (I'm using Firefox) – Frederic Kizar Jul 18 '13 at 19:26
  • Working for me on FF/Chrome/IE. Try copy/pasting into a new one, that might work. – Pat Lillis Jul 18 '13 at 19:30
  • Yes, worked! a checkboxe was displayed, so I replaced first line! thx mate! :) If no one come up with a non-checkboxes solution, well it's all yours ;) – Frederic Kizar Jul 18 '13 at 20:40
  • Cool cool. This does seem kind of cheaty, but eh it gets the job done. – Pat Lillis Jul 18 '13 at 20:41
  • 1
    This solution doesn't loose the display settings if the user clicks on content other than the radio buttons. It could be used for page navigation. – Alan Wells Jul 9 '14 at 0:57
13

I used a hidden checkbox to persistent view of some message. The checkbox could be hidden (display:none) or not. This is a tiny code that I could write.

You can see and test the demo on JSFiddle

HTML:

<input type=checkbox id="show">
<label for="show">Help?</label>
<span id="content">Do you need some help?</span>

CSS:

#show,#content{display:none;}
#show:checked~#content{display:block;}

Run code snippet:

#show,#content{display:none;}
#show:checked~#content{display:block;}
<input id="show" type=checkbox>
<label for="show">Click for Help</label>
<span  id="content">Do you need some help?</span>

http://jsfiddle.net/9s8scbL7/

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I really like this: elegantly simple and totally functional! It doesn't even jump up to the top of the screen like the checkbox hack does. – Henry Jun 5 at 3:48
12

There is 3 rapid examples with pure CSS and without javascript where the content appears "on click", with a "maintained click" and a third "onhover" (all only tested in Chrome). Sorry for the up of this post but this question are the first seo result and maybe my contribution can help beginner like me

I think (not tested) but the advantage of argument "content" that you can add great icon like from Font Awesome (its \f-Code) or an hexadecimal icon in place of the text "Hide" and "Show" to internationalize the trick.

example link http://jsfiddle.net/MonkeyTime/h3E9p/2/

<style>
label { position: absolute; top:0; left:0}

input#show, input#hide {
    display:none;
}

span#content {
    display: block;
    -webkit-transition: opacity 1s ease-out;
    transition: opacity 1s ease-out;
    opacity: 0; 
    height: 0;
    font-size: 0;
    overflow: hidden;
}

input#show:checked ~ .show:before {
    content: ""
}
input#show:checked ~ .hide:before {
    content: "Hide"
}

input#hide:checked ~ .hide:before {
    content: ""
}
input#hide:checked ~ .show:before {
    content: "Show"
}
input#show:checked ~ span#content {
    opacity: 1;
    font-size: 100%;
    height: auto;
}
input#hide:checked ~ span#content {
    display: block;
    -webkit-transition: opacity 1s ease-out;
    transition: opacity 1s ease-out;
    opacity: 0; 
    height: 0;
    font-size: 0;
    overflow: hidden;
}
</style>
<input type="radio" id="show" name="group">   
<input type="radio" id="hide" name="group" checked>
<label for="hide" class="hide"></label>
<label for="show" class="show"></label>
<span id="content">Lorem iupsum dolor si amet</span>


<style>
#show1 { position: absolute; top:20px; left:0}
#content1 {
    display: block;
    -webkit-transition: opacity 1s ease-out;
    transition: opacity 1s ease-out;
    opacity: 0; 
    height: 0;
    font-size: 0;
    overflow: hidden;
}
#show1:before {
    content: "Show"
}
#show1:active.show1:before {
    content: "Hide"
}
#show1:active ~ span#content1 {
    opacity: 1;
    font-size: 100%;
    height: auto;
}
</style>

<div id="show1" class="show1"></div>
<span id="content1">Ipsum Lorem</span>


<style>
#show2 { position: absolute; top:40px; left:0}
#content2 {
    display: block;
    -webkit-transition: opacity 1s ease-out;
    transition: opacity 1s ease-out;
    opacity: 0; 
    height: 0;
    font-size: 0;
    overflow: hidden;
}
#show2:before {
    content: "Show"
}
#show2:hover.show2:before {
    content: "Hide"
}
#show2:hover ~ span#content2 {
    opacity: 1;
    font-size: 100%;
    height: auto;
}

/* extra */
#content, #content1, #content2 {
    float: left;
    margin: 100px auto;
}
</style>

<div id="show2" class="show2"></div>
<span id="content2">Lorem Ipsum</span>
| improve this answer | |
8

This is what I've used recently.

CSS

div#tabs p{display:none;}

div#tabs p.tab1:target {display:block;}
div#tabs p.tab2:target {display:block;}
div#tabs p.tab3:target {display:block;}

HTML

<div id='tabs'>
  <h2 class="nav-tab-wrapper">
    <a href="#tab1" class="nav-tab tab1">Pages</a>
    <a href="#tab2" class="nav-tab nav-tab-active tab2">Email</a>
    <a href="#tab3" class="nav-tab tab3">Support</a>
  </h2>

  <p id='tab1' class='tab1'>Awesome tab1 stuff</p>
  <p id='tab2' class='tab2'>Tab2 stuff</p>
  <p id='tab3' class='tab3'>Tab3 stuff</p>

</div>

https://jsfiddle.net/hoq0djwc/1/

Hope it helps somewhere.

| improve this answer | |
5

First, thanks to William.

Second - i needed a dynamic version. And it works!

An example:

CSS:

p[id^="detailView-"]
{
    display: none;
}

p[id^="detailView-"]:target
{
    display: block;
}

HTML:

<a href="#detailView-1">Show View1</a>
<p id="detailView-1">View1</p>

<a href="#detailView-2">Show View2</a>
<p id="detailView-2">View2</p>
| improve this answer | |
2

The answer below includes changing text for "show/hide", and uses a single checkbox, two labels, a total of four lines of html and five lines of css. It also starts out with the content hidden.

Try it in JSFiddle

HTML

<input id="display-toggle" type=checkbox>
<label id="display-button" for="display-toggle"><span>Display Content</span></label>
<label id="hide-button" for="display-toggle"><span>Hide Content</span></label>    
<div id="hidden-content"><br />Hidden Content</div>

CSS

label {
  background-color: #ccc;
  color: brown;
  padding: 15px;
  text-decoration: none;
  font-size: 16px;
  border: 2px solid brown;
  border-radius: 5px;
  display: block;
  width: 200px;
  text-align: center;
}

input,
label#hide-button,
#hidden-content {
  display: none;
}

input#display-toggle:checked ~ label#display-button {
  display: none;
}

input#display-toggle:checked ~ label#hide-button {
  display: block;
  background-color: #aaa;
  color: #333
}

input#display-toggle:checked ~ #hidden-content {
  display: block;
} 
| improve this answer | |
2

Nowadays (2020) you can do this with pure HTML5 and you don't need JavaScript or CSS3.

<details>
<summary>Put your summary here</summary>
<p>Put your content here!</p>
</details>
| improve this answer | |
1

I've got another simple solution:

HTML:

<a href="#alert" class="span3" tabindex="0">Hide Me</a>
<a href="#" class="span2" tabindex="0">Show Me</a>
<p id="alert" class="alert" >Some alarming information here</p>

CSS:

body { display: block; }
p.alert:target { display: none; }

Source: http://css-tricks.com/off-canvas-menu-with-css-target/

| improve this answer | |
1

I know it's an old post but what about this solution (I've made a JSFiddle to illustrate it)... Solution that uses the :after pseudo elements of <span> to show/hide the <span> switch link itself (in addition to the .alert message it must show/hide). When the pseudo element loses it's focus, the message is hidden.

The initial situation is a hidden message that appears when the <span> with the :after content : "Show Me"; is focused. When this <span> is focused, it's :after content becomes empty while the :after content of the second <span> (that was initially empty) turns to "Hide Me". So, when you click this second <span> the first one loses it's focus and the situation comes back to it's initial state.

I started on the solution offered by @Vector I kept the DOM'situation presented ky @Frederic Kizar

HTML:

<span class="span3" tabindex="0"></span>
<span class="span2" tabindex="0"></span>
<p class="alert" >Some message to show here</p>

CSS:

body {
    display: inline-block;
}
.span3 ~ .span2:after{
    content:"";
}
.span3:focus ~ .alert  {
    display:block;
}
.span3:focus ~ .span2:after  {
    content:"Hide Me";
}
.span3:after  {
    content: "Show Me";
}
.span3:focus:after  {
    content: "";
}
.alert  {
    display:none;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Working on that idea and reading an answer from @Frederic Kizar where he said that with several < span> the thing goes messy, I've made this other JSFiddle [link] (jsfiddle.net/a14bztje) where I play with the first occurence of an element following an other ( + ) in CSS plus sign, to achieve the result. Note that the < span> and < p> tags keep same shared classes. I used the attr(data-something) for the pseudo contents to personalize the hide/show links. – Diepen Feb 18 '17 at 1:22
  • One hour later :-) I've revised the [link] (jsfiddle.net/a14bztje) JSFiddle to simplify it. I removed the classes... just play with the tags styles. And it still works ! And instead of a new attribute (for the show/hide text), I use the "title" attribute to "embed" the text... So we win an onmouseover advantage to display the tooltip... Other styles like margin, position, background-color etc. are there for the visual purpose... The "trick" resides in the sequence of the objects: < span> + < span> + < p> – Diepen Feb 18 '17 at 2:17
  • Ok, for more clarity, I've made two JSFidle demos. One with only "the CSS's trick" (same link as previous one just above link ). Note that I forgot the classes and just play with sequences of three < span> elements, separated by at least another tag. Also note that I used the Title="something" attribute to "embed" the switches texts (Show me / Hide me), so we gain an on hover effect ;-). You could have used a personalized attribute like data-text="Something", instead of the title attribute... (to be continued...) – Diepen Feb 19 '17 at 15:33
  • In a second JSFiddle example link, I've made some aesthetic adjustments in the CSS, to demonstrate a pratical usage that we could do with all of that. Note here, that I use visibility instead of display and then I add a position:absolute, to allow multiline text in the messages, without destroying all the alignments of the "switch links". ... (to be continued...) – Diepen Feb 19 '17 at 15:36
  • The interest, is that you can add any number of sequences of three <span> elements without worrying about classes, names or ids, and just focus on the content of your elements. All of this achieved without Javascript nor checkboxes, <ul> , <li> nor <label for > . ;-) – Diepen Feb 19 '17 at 15:37
0

A very easy solution from cssportal.com

If pressed [show], the text [show] will be hidden and other way around.

This example does not work in Chrome, I don't why...

.show {
	display: none;
}
.hide:focus + .show {
	display: inline;
}
.hide:focus {
	display: none;
}
.hide:focus ~ #list { display:none; }
@media print {
.hide, .show {
	display: none;
}
}
<div><a class="hide" href="#">[hide]</a> <a class="show" href="#">[show]</a>
<ol id="list">
<li>item 1</li>
<li>item 2</li>
<li>item 3</li>
</ol>
</div>

| improve this answer | |
0

Just wanted to illustrate, in the context of nested lists, the usefulness of the hidden checkbox <input> approach @jeffmcneill recommends — a context where each shown/hidden element should hold its state independently of focus and the show/hide state of other elements on the page.

Giving values with a common set of beginning characters to the id attributes of all the checkboxes used for the shown/hidden elements on the page lets you use an economical [id^=""] selector scheme for the stylesheet rules that toggle your clickable element’s appearance and the related shown/hidden element’s display state back and forth. Here, my ids are ‘expanded-1,’ ‘expanded-2,’ ‘expanded-3.’

Note that I’ve also used @Diepen’s :after selector idea in order to keep the <label> element free of content in the html.

Note also that the <input> <label> <div class="collapsible"> sequence matters, and the corresponding CSS with + selector instead of ~.

jsfiddle here

.collapse-below {
    display: inline;
}

p.collapse-below::after {
    content: '\000A0\000A0';
}

p.collapse-below ~ label {
    display: inline;
}

p.collapse-below ~ label:hover {
    color: #ccc;
}

input.collapse-below,
ul.collapsible {
    display: none;
}

input[id^="expanded"]:checked + label::after {
    content: '\025BE';
}

input[id^="expanded"]:not(:checked) + label::after {
    content: '\025B8';
}

input[id^="expanded"]:checked + label + ul.collapsible {
    display: block;
}

input[id^="expanded"]:not(:checked) + label + ul.collapsible {
    display: none;
}
<ul>
  <li>single item a</li>
  <li>single item b</li>
  <li>
    <p class="collapse-below" title="this expands">multiple item a</p>
    <input type="checkbox" id="expanded-1" class="collapse-below" name="toggle">
    <label for="expanded-1" title="click to expand"></label>
    <ul class="collapsible">
      <li>sub item a.1</li>
      <li>sub item a.2</li>
    </ul>
  </li>
  <li>single item c</li>
  <li>
    <p class="collapse-below" title="this expands">multiple item b</p>
    <input type="checkbox" id="expanded-2" class="collapse-below" name="toggle">
    <label for="expanded-2" title="click to expand"></label>
    <ul class="collapsible">
      <li>sub item b.1</li>
      <li>sub item b.2</li>
    </ul>
  </li>
  <li>single item d</li>
  <li>single item e</li>
  <li>
    <p class="collapse-below" title="this expands">multiple item c</p>
    <input type="checkbox" id="expanded-3" class="collapse-below" name="toggle">
    <label for="expanded-3" title="click to expand"></label>
    <ul class="collapsible">
      <li>sub item c.1</li>
      <li>sub item c.2</li>
    </ul>
  </li>
</ul>

| improve this answer | |

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