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I am quite new to C# and was trying to use lambda expressions.

I am having a list of object. I would like to select item from the list and perform foreach operation on the selected items. I know i could do it without using lambda expression but wanted to if this was possible using lambda expression.

So i was trying to achieve a similar result

        List<UserProfile> users = new List<UserProfile>();
       ..load users with list of users
        List<UserProfile> selecteditem = users.Where(i => i.UserName=="").ToList();
        foreach(UserProfile item in selecteditem)
        {
            item.UserName = "NA";
        }

it was possible to do

      users.Where(i => i.UserName=="").ToList().ForEach(i=>i.UserName="NA");

but not something like this

     users.select(i => i.UserName=="").ForEach(i=>i.UserName="NA");

Can someone explain this behaviour..

marked as duplicate by I4V, p.s.w.g, jason, Austin Salonen, Graviton Jul 19 '13 at 3:47

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

11

Let's start here:

I am having a list of object.

It's important to understand that, while accurate, that statement leaves a c# programmer wanting more. What kind of object? In the .Net world, it pays to always keep in mind what specific type of object you are working with. In this case, that type is UserProfile. This may seem like a side issue, but it will become more relevant to the specific question very quickly. What you want to say instead is this:

I have a list of UserProfile objects.

Now let's look at your two expressions:

users.Where(i => i.UserName=="").ToList().ForEach(i=>i.UserName="NA");

and

users.Where(i => i.UserName=="").ForEach(i=>i.UserName="NA");

The difference (aside from that only the first compiles or works) is that you need to call .ToList() to convert the results of Where() function to a List type. Now we begin to see why it is that you want to always think in terms of types when working with .Net code, because it should now occur to you to wonder, "What type am I working with, then?" I'm glad you asked.

The .Where() function results in an IEnumerable<T> type, which is actually not a full type all by itself. It's an interface that describes certain things a type that implements it's contract will be able to do. The IEnumerable interface can be confusing at first, but the important thing to remember is that it defines something that you can use with a foreach loop. That is it's sole purpose. Anything in .Net that you can use with a foreach loop: arrays, lists, collections — they pretty much all implement the IEnumerable interface. There are other things you can loop over, as well. Strings, for example. Many methods you have today that require a List or Array as an argument can be made more powerful and flexible simply by changing that argument type to IEnumerable.

.Net also makes it easy to create state machine-based iterators that will work with this interface. This is especially useful for creating objects that don't themselves hold any items, but do know how to loop over items in a different collection in a specific way. For example, I might loop over just items 3 through 12 in an array of size 20. Or might loop over the items in alphabetical order. The important thing here is that I can do this without needing to copy or duplicate the originals. This makes it very efficient in terms of memory, and it's structure in such a way that you can easily compose different iterators together to get very powerful results.

The IEnumerable<T> type is especially important, because it is one of two types (the other being IQueryable) that form the core of the linq system. Most of the .Where(), .Select(), .Any() etc linq operators you can use are defined as extensions to IEnumerable.

But now we come to an exception: ForEach(). This method is not part of IEnumerable. It is defined directly as part of the List<T> type. So, we see again that it's important to understand what type you are working with at all times, including the results of each of the different expressions that make up a complete statement.

It's also instructional to go into why this particular method is not part of IEnumerable directly. I believe the answer lies in the fact that the linq system takes a lot of inspiration from a the Functional Programming world. In functional programming, you want to have operations (functions) that do exactly one thing, with no side effects. Ideally, these functions will not alter the original data, but rather they will return new data. The ForEach() method is implicitly all about creating bad side effects that alter data. It's just bad functional style. Additionally, ForEach() breaks method chaining, in that it doesn't return a new IEnumerable.

There is one more lesson to learn here. Let's take a look at your original snippet:

List<UserProfile> users = new List<UserProfile>();
// ..load users with list of users
List<UserProfile> selecteditem = users.Where(i => i.UserName=="").ToList();
foreach(UserProfile item in selecteditem)
{
    item.UserName = "NA";
}

I mentioned something earlier that should help you significantly improve this code. Remember that bit about how you can have IEnumerable items that loop over a collection, without duplicating it? Think about what happens if you wrote that code this way, instead:

List<UserProfile> users = new List<UserProfile>();
// ..load users with list of users
var selecteditem = users.Where(i => i.UserName=="");
foreach(UserProfile item in selecteditem)
{
    item.UserName = "NA";
}

All I did was remove the call to .ToList(), but everything will still work. The only thing that changed is we avoided needing to copy the entire list. That should make this code faster. In some circumstances, it can make the code a lot faster. Something to keep in mind: when working the with the linq operator methods, it's generally good to avoid calling .ToArray() or .ToList() whenever possible, and it's possible a lot more than you might think.

As for the foreach() {...} vs .Foreach( ... ): the former is still perfectly appropriate style.

5

Sure, it's quite simple. List has a ForEach method. There is no such method, or extension method, for IEnumerable.

As to why one has a method and another doesn't, that's an opinion. Eric Lippert blogged on the topic if you're interested in his.

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