15

I am trying to create a vector that holds an int and a string. Is this possible?

For example I want vector<int>myArr to hold string x= "Picture This"

4

5 Answers 5

20

You can use a union, but there are better alternatives.

You can use boost::variant to get this kind of functionality:

using string_int = boost::variant<std::string, int>;

std::vector<string_int> vec;

To get either a string or an int out of a variant, you can use boost::get:

std::string& my_string = boost::get<std::string>(vec[0]);

Edit
Well, it's 2017 now. You no longer need Boost to have variant, as we now have std::variant!

5
  • You can create a vector of union type with a fixed size string (const char[]) and an integer without needing to use boost. You can also use std::string but you need place the union in a struct with a type tag for the destructor to choose the correct type to destroy. See the end of the link in my answer.
    – devil
    Commented Jul 20, 2013 at 4:55
  • Sorry, no need the const for the char[].
    – devil
    Commented Jul 20, 2013 at 5:03
  • @Magtheridon6 Regardless of those reasons, the answer to OP's question should be yes.
    – devil
    Commented Jul 21, 2013 at 7:31
  • 1
    std::variant is available in STL starting from C++17 Commented Jun 19, 2017 at 5:49
  • @AndreyStarodubtsev Good catch!
    – user123
    Commented Jun 22, 2017 at 23:36
13

Yes it is possible to hold two different types, you can create a vector of union types. The space used will be the larger of the types. Union types are explained here along with how you can tag the type. A small example:

union Numeric
{
    int i;
    float f;
};

std::vector<Numeric> someNumbers;
Numeric n;
n.i = 4;
someNumbers.push_back(n);

You can also use std::string but you need place the union in a struct with a type tag for the destructor to choose the correct type to destroy. See the end of the link.

7

If you want the vector to hold two different types you can use a std::pair (or std::tuple if more than two)

In C++03:

std::vector<std::pair<int, std::string> > myArr;

If you want the vector to hold one type that can be used as two different types: No, it can't be done.

3

No, a vector must only hold variables of the type declared within the angle brackets < >.

You could create a class that has an int member and a string member, and then create a vector to hold instances of that class, and then reference the int or string members when you need to.

2
  • @chris Well, that would depend on the application.
    – Cory Klein
    Commented Jul 18, 2013 at 21:26
  • 2
    @CoryKlein: Indeed. But the advice for learners should never mention pointers in containers. It's so rarely needed, and so easily to mess up, that no purpose is served by explaining the possibility until the actual problem at hand requires it. And then you'd still suggest smart pointers.
    – MSalters
    Commented Jul 18, 2013 at 23:15
0

No. myArr is instantiated to hold int type. It can store only int type.

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