9

Is there a way for SQL Server Management Studio Express How to list all the non empty tables? I have over 100 tables to go through and check for data.

  • In a single DB or multiple DBs? – JNK Jul 19 '13 at 14:20
  • single database – Peter Sun Jul 19 '13 at 19:11
12

You could try using sysindexes and INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES:)

SELECT 'Table Name'=convert(char(25),t.TABLE_NAME),
      'Total Record Count'=max(i.rows)
FROM sysindexes i, INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES t
WHERE t.TABLE_NAME = object_name(i.id)
      and t.TABLE_TYPE = 'BASE TABLE'
GROUP BY t.TABLE_SCHEMA, t.TABLE_NAME
HAVING max(i.rows)<=0
  • i ended using thos code because i have no idea what i am doing.. i just added databasename.INFORM... – Peter Sun Jul 19 '13 at 19:20
  • 2
    I like how you include tables with fewer than 0 rows ;) – Josh Noe Feb 21 '14 at 15:51
4

Morris Miao's solution uses the deprecated sys.sysindexes view; and performs the join to INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES on the basis of table name, which is not guaranteed to be unique; even within a database.

Simon's solution is not scoped to the current database; but can be refined through the use of sys.tables:

SELECT r.table_name, r.row_count, r.[object_id]
FROM sys.tables t
INNER JOIN (
    SELECT OBJECT_NAME(s.[object_id]) table_name, SUM(s.row_count) row_count, s.[object_id]
    FROM sys.dm_db_partition_stats s
    WHERE s.index_id in (0,1)
    GROUP BY s.[object_id]
) r on t.[object_id] = r.[object_id]
WHERE r.row_count > 0
ORDER BY r.table_name;
  • This seems to make more sense.. – Divyang Jun 7 at 10:45
3

Try :

WITH TableRows AS
(
   SELECT 
      SUM(row_count) AS [RowCount], 
      OBJECT_NAME(OBJECT_ID) AS TableName
   FROM 
      sys.dm_db_partition_stats
   WHERE 
      index_id = 0 OR index_id = 1
   GROUP BY 
      OBJECT_ID
)

SELECT *
FROM TableRows
WHERE [RowCount] > 0
  • 1
    How about getting the nonempty tables in one database? – Peter Sun Jul 19 '13 at 18:31
  • @PeterSun: See my answer. – Mankarse Sep 14 '16 at 7:31
1

One could also use "Object Explorer Details (F7)", navigate to the "Tables"-Folder of the database of interest and set the Object Explorer Details to show thw Row Count (right click on the headers)

1

Lets say Tables can be of two types.

  1. Clustered Table ( Tables having a Clustered Index )
  2. Heap Tables ( Tables not having a Clustered Index )

All tables in SQL Server are divided into partitions. So that all table will have atleast one partition .

In sys.partitions, there exists one row for each partition of all tables.

These rows in sys.partitions contains information about number of rows in that partition of the corresponding table.

Since all tables in SQL Server contain aleast one partition, we can get the information about number of rows in a table from sys.partitions.

SELECT
        OBJECT_NAME(T.OBJECT_ID) AS TABLE_NAME,
        SUM(P.ROWS)  AS TOTAL_ROWS
FROM
        SYS.TABLES T
INNER JOIN 
        SYS.PARTITIONS P 
        ON T.OBJECT_ID = P.OBJECT_ID
WHERE 
        P.INDEX_ID IN (0,1)
GROUP BY 
        T.OBJECT_ID
HAVING 
        SUM(P.ROWS) > 0

While taking sum of rows in different partitions, we are considering index_id (0,1)

  • index_id = 0 for Heap
  • index_id = 1 for Clustered index
  • index_id > 1 are for nonclustered index.

A table can have either one clustered index or none.

But that is not the case with nonclustered index. A table can have multiple nonclustered indexes. So we cannot use those index_id while summing rows.

  • Heap Tables will be having index_id = 0
  • Clustered Tables will be having index_id = 1
1

This is a slight improvement to @jophab's answer. It will show schema for tables as well as compare rows = 0 using sys.partitions.

SELECT 
    sch.name as SchemaName,
    t.NAME AS TableName,
    p.rows AS RowCounts
FROM 
    sys.tables t
INNER JOIN 
    sys.partitions p ON t.object_id = p.OBJECT_ID 
INNER JOIN sys.schemas sch
    on t.schema_id = sch.schema_id
WHERE 
    t.NAME NOT LIKE 'dt%' 
    AND t.is_ms_shipped = 0
    AND p.rows = 0
GROUP BY 
    sch.name,t.Name, p.Rows
ORDER BY 
    sch.name,t.Name

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