-3

I'm encountering a design challenge. There is a huge std::vector<int> called O say of size 10000. There are two many objects of type Foo, f_1...f_n. Each Foo has an internal std::vector<int> which is a suborder of O. For example:

O = 1, 2, ..., 100000
f_1.order = 1, 2, 3
f_2.order = 1, 4, 16
f_3.order = 100, 101, 102
// ...

The main requirement is to update corresponding values of O when a f_n changes its values. Length and contents of all Foo objects are knows at construction time and not supposed to change during their lifetime. For example it's known that f_1 holds first, second and third elements of O.

The obvious solution is to use pointers of course. Foo may hold a std::vector<int*> which each element points to underlying data of original order (O).

On the other hand, my program do some heavy calculations using Foo objects. So I'm looking for a method to remove overhead of pointer dereferencing. It would be nice if design allow me to use some sort of std::vector<int&> but it's not possible (I guess because vector<T> needs presence of T*).

A colleague suggested to use boost::ptr_vector. Another suggested holding indexes in a vector<size_t>...

  • 11
    Overhead of pointer dereferencing? Really? – Carl Norum Jul 19 '13 at 16:43
  • 8
    (1) You cannot user references in containers. (2) References have dereference overhead identical to that of pointers. – n. 'pronouns' m. Jul 19 '13 at 16:44
  • 3
    Ouh...prepare for some nice comments. ;) – Chris says Reinstate Monica Jul 19 '13 at 16:47
  • 2
    A solution to overhead is to use more overhead? Dereferencing a pointer vs indexing a vector and use the result to index other vector? LOL – Manu343726 Jul 19 '13 at 16:47
  • 2
    And, note that the overhead with pointers is not the derefence (Its done with one or two assambler instructions), is the posibility of cache misses. If the pointer points to a near memory address, there are no miss, so there is no overhead. On the other hand, your index holding vector solution is not cache friendly. – Manu343726 Jul 19 '13 at 16:50
2

It sound as premature optimization. Dereference a pointer is ridiculously cheap.

The obvious solution is to use pointers of course. Foo may hold a std::vector which each element points to underlying data of original order (O).

Here a solution, deducting what you need, not using pointers, using std::reference_wrapper and std::ref:

struct Foo
{
    Foo(std::vector<int>& _data) : dataFull(_data)
    { ; }

    void add(int index)
    {
        assert(index < dataFull.size());

        if(index < references.size())
        {
            // replace
            references[index] = std::ref(dataFull[index]);
        }
        else
        {
            // add n times, need sync with index
            while(index >= references.size())
            {
                references.push_back(std::ref(dataFull[index]));
            }
        }

        // mark as valid index
        indexes.push_back(index);
        // sort for can find with binary_search
        std::sort(indexes.begin(), indexes.end());
    }

    int* get(int index)
    {
        if(std::binary_search(indexes.begin(), indexes.end(), index))
        {
            return &references[index].get();
        }
        else
        {
            return NULL;
        }
    }

protected:
    std::vector<int>& dataFull;
    std::vector<std::reference_wrapper<int> > references;
    std::vector<int> indexes;
};

int main()
{
    const int size = 1000000;
    std::vector<int> O;
    O.resize(1000000, 0);

    Foo f_1(O);
    f_1.add(1);
    f_1.add(2);
    f_1.add(3);

    Foo f_2(O);
    f_2.add(1);
    f_2.add(4);
    f_2.add(16);

    Foo f_3(O);
    f_3.add(100);
    f_3.add(101);
    f_3.add(102);

    // index 1 is changed, it must affect to all "Foo" that use this index (f_1 and f_2)
    O[1] = 666;

    // checking if it changed
    assert( *f_1.get(1) == 666 );
    assert( *f_2.get(1) == 666 );
    assert(  f_3.get(1) == NULL );

    return 0;
}

EDIT: Performance is same that if you use pointer, but std::reference_wrapper can be integrated best in templated code because you have T& and don't need have code for T* and T&.

Have indexes in other vector, only is useful if your struct is ordered by multiple criteria.

I show a example with a vector, where T is a struct complex with two fields. I can reorder this vector with 2 criterias, without touch the original.

template <typename T>
struct Index
{
    typedef typename bool(*Comparator)(const T&, const T&);

    Index(std::vector<T>& _data, Comparator _comp)
        : dataFull(_data)
        , comp(_comp)
    {
        for(unsigned int i = 0; i < dataFull.size(); ++i)
        {
            add(i);
        }
        commit();
    }

    void commit()
    {
        std::sort(references.begin(), references.end(), comp);
    }

    std::vector<std::reference_wrapper<T> >& getReference() {return references;}

protected:

    void add(int index)
    {
        assert(index < dataFull.size());
        references.push_back(std::ref(dataFull[index]));
    }

protected:
    std::vector<T>& dataFull;
    std::vector<std::reference_wrapper<T> > references;
    Comparator comp;
};

int main()
{
    struct ComplexData
    {
        int field1;
        int field2;
    };

    // Generate vector
    const int size = 10;
    std::vector<ComplexData> data;
    data.resize(size);
    for(unsigned int i = 0; i < size; ++i)
    {
        ComplexData& c = data[i];
        c.field1 = i;
        c.field2 = size - i;
    }

    // Vector reordered without touch original
    std::cout << "Vector data, ordered by field1" << std::endl;
    {
        Index<ComplexData> f_1(data, 
            [](const ComplexData& a, const ComplexData& b){return a.field1 < b.field1;});
        auto it = f_1.getReference().begin();
        auto ite = f_1.getReference().end();
        for(; it != ite; ++it)
        {
            std::cout << "-> " << it->get().field1 << " - " << it->get().field2 << std::endl;
        }
    }

    // Vector reordered without touch original
    std::cout << "Vector data, ordered by field2" << std::endl;
    {
        Index<ComplexData> f_2(data, 
            [](const ComplexData& a, const ComplexData& b){return a.field2 < b.field2;});
        auto it = f_2.getReference().begin();
        auto ite = f_2.getReference().end();
        for(; it != ite; ++it)
        {
            std::cout << "-> " << it->get().field1 << " - " << it->get().field2 << std::endl;
        }
    }

    return 0;
}
  • Why would this be faster than pointers, given that references have the same overhead as pointers? – Nikos C. Jul 21 '13 at 15:19
6

I would say that optimizing for pointer dereferencing overhead is pointless. Let's look at some example code:

void bar(int i);

void foo(int* p, int i)
{
    bar(*p);
    bar(i);
}

And now let's look at the assembly of it:

void foo(int* p, int i)
{
                      push   rbx
                      mov    ebx, esi

    bar(*p);
                      mov    edi, DWORD PTR [rdi]
                      call   a <foo+0xa>

    bar(i);
                      mov    edi, ebx
                      call   11 <foo+0x11>
}

There's an "overhead" of one memory read.

As for using references, it's not gonna do anything useful. References may have different semantics to pointers, but underneath, they're still pointers:

void foo(int& r)
{
    bar(r);
                      mov    edi,DWORD PTR [rbx]
                      call   20 <_Z3fooPiiRi+0x20>
}

There's the same memory read happening.

I'm not sure if this counts as an "answer", but seriously: don't bother.

5

This cannot be stressed enough - do not optimize your code before you know you have a problem. Pointer dereferencing is not costly, and is usually not the main bottleneck in a program.

Note that references are implemented using pointer dereferencing, so even if you could do std::vector<int&>, it would not help.

If you really, really feel you must do something - even though I'm really, totally sure it can't possibly help your performance in any meaningful sense - you could try overlaying the memory. That is, you could define it like this (note that I'm not in any way endorsing this - I'm only pointing it out so that you don't do something worse):

std::vector<int> O;

struct Foo {
   int *myData;
   int &operator[](int offset) { return myData[offset]; }
};

O.resize(1000000, 0);
Foo f_1, f_2, ...;
f_1.myData = &(O[0]);
f_2.myData = &(O[3]);

O[0] = 5;
cout << f_1[0]; // prints 5

Also, BTW - please, please, please, do not use the name O as a variable. Please. It looks like a zero.

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