17

I am using snprintf like this to avoid a buffer overrun:

char err_msg[32] = {0};
snprintf(err_msg, sizeof(err_msg) - 1, "[ ST_ENGINE_FAILED ]");

I added the -1 to reserve space for the null terminator in case the string is more than 32 bytes long.

Am I correct in my thinking?

Platform:

  • GCC 4.4.1
  • C99
  • 2
    Side note: GCC doesn't support C99: gcc.gnu.org/c99status.html – Bastien Léonard Nov 21 '09 at 13:53
  • 2
    Are you aware, though, of a modern environment where the gcc and standard library combo doesn't include snprintf? – LnxPrgr3 Nov 21 '09 at 18:15
  • 3
    When I was using MinGW one or two years ago, it actually called Microsoft's _snprintf(), which doesn't behave like the standard snprintf() (I think it doesn't always nul-terminate the string). – Bastien Léonard Nov 21 '09 at 19:25
28

As others have said, you do not need the -1 in this case. If the array is fixed size, I would use strncpy instead. It was made for copying strings - sprintf was made for doing difficult formatting. However, if the size of the array is unknown or you are trying to determine how much storage is necessary for a formatted string. This is what I really like about the Standard specified version of snprintf:

char* get_error_message(char const *msg) {
    size_t needed = snprintf(NULL, 0, "%s: %s (%d)", msg, strerror(errno), errno);
    char  *buffer = malloc(needed+1);
    sprintf(buffer, "%s: %s (%d)", msg, strerror(errno), errno);
    return buffer;
}

Combine this feature with va_copy and you can create very safe formatted string operations.  

  • 4
    Don't use strncpy() if there string might be too big to fit into the target; strncpy() does NOT null-terminate what it copies if it is too long. Further, it always copies N characters - even if the source is 1 byte and the target is 1 megabyte. – Jonathan Leffler Nov 22 '09 at 19:10
  • 1
    @Jonathan: Nope. while you are right that strncpy does not terminate with \0 it does stop if it does find a string terminator in the source string. – Nicholaz Nov 22 '09 at 21:15
  • 1
    For fixed length buffers, I usually use strncpy(dest, src, sizeof(dest)); dest[sizeof(dest)-1] = '\0'; That guarantees NULL termination and is just less hassle than snprintf not to mention that a lot of people use snprintf(dest, sizeof(dest), src); instead and are very surprised when their programs crash arbitrarily. – D.Shawley Nov 22 '09 at 21:22
  • 2
    @JeremySalwen - thanks for catching that... that's what I get for writing Java =) – D.Shawley Aug 31 '12 at 16:03
  • 2
    You could simply use sprintf(buffer, …, since you have reserved buffer of the exact right size. That would avoid this bug. – Pascal Cuoq Jun 13 '14 at 17:37
12

You don't need the -1, as the reference states:

The functions snprintf() and vsnprintf() do not write more than size bytes (including the trailing '\0').

Note the "including the trailing '\0'" part

9

No need for -1. C99 snprintf always zero-terminates. Size argument specifies the size of output buffer including zero terminator. The code, thus, becomes

char err_msg[32];
int ret = snprintf(err_msg, sizeof err_msg, "[ ST_ENGINE_FAILED ]");

ret contains actual number of characters printed (excluding zero terminator).

However, do not confuse with Microsoft's _snprintf (pre-C99), which does not null-terminate, and, for that matter, has completely different behaviour (e.g. returning -1 instead of would-be printed length in case if buffer is not big enough). If using _snprintf, you should be using the same code as in your question.

3

According to snprintf(3):

The functions snprintf() and vsnprintf() do not write more than size bytes (including the trailing '\0').

1

For the example given, you should be doing this instead:

char err_msg[32];
strncpy(err_msg, "[ ST_ENGINE_FAILED ]", sizeof(err_msg));
err_msg[sizeof(err_msg) - 1] = '\0';

or even better:

char err_msg[32] = "[ ST_ENGINE_FAILED ]";
  • 1
    As noted in a comment to another answer: Don't use strncpy() if there string might be too big to fit into the target; strncpy() does NOT null-terminate what it copies if it is too long. Further, it always copies N characters - even if the source is 1 byte and the target is 1 megabyte. – Jonathan Leffler Nov 22 '09 at 19:11
  • 1
    @Jonathan Leffler, your description of how many bytes strncpy() is incorrect. "At most n bytes of src are copied." I've adjusted the example to fix the null-termination. – Matt Joiner Nov 22 '09 at 21:07
  • @anacrolix: your example does not guarantee NULL termination. It does guarantee that strncpy() will never overwrite the last character in the buffer. You have to explicitly do err_msg[sizeof(err_msg)-1] = '\0'; to get termination. – D.Shawley Dec 11 '09 at 12:20
-1

sizeof will return the number of bytes the datatype will use in memory, not the length of the string. E.g. sizeof(int) returns '4' bytes on a 32-bit system (well, depending on the implementation I guess). Since you use a constant in your array, you can happily pass that to the printf.

  • 1
    He's applying sizeof to the destination array, which is completely correct. – caf Nov 21 '09 at 13:14
  • 32 is correct. In that case he does not want the size of the string (which is given by strlen) he wants the err_msg buffer capacity (to guarantee it will not write past its end). – João Portela Jan 11 '11 at 18:03

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.