1

I am following a tutorial to create getter and setter in Javascript, I have the code like this:

// Create a new User object that accept an object of properties
function User(properties) {
    // Iterate through the properties of the object, and make
    // sure it's properly scoped
    for (var i in properties) { (function(){
        // Create a new getter for the property
        this['get' + i] = function() {
            return properties[i];
        };

        // Create a new setter for the property
        this['set' + i] = function(val) {
            properties[i] = val;
        };
    })(); }
}

// Create a new User object instance and pass in an object of
// properties to seed it with
var user = new User({
    name: 'Bob',
    age: 28
});

// Just note that the name property does not exist, as it's private
// within the property object
console.log(user.name == null);

// However, we are able to access its value using the new getname()
// method, that was dynamically generated
console.log(user.getname());

However, console shows error saying user does not have method getname. The code is trying to dynamically generate getter and setter method, it looks ok to me. Any thoughts?

11
  • Your in-loop function is losing the this, do a var t = this; outside loop and refer to t inside. – Paul S. Jul 20 '13 at 17:33
  • 2
    You could also use es5 getters/setters. – beatgammit Jul 20 '13 at 17:34
  • Then you need to know that i as you use it in the getter/setter will always have the same value (i.e., the last value of the loop) for all getters/setters the code creates. – sjngm Jul 20 '13 at 17:35
  • 1
    Why do you have an anonymous function in your for loop? What purpose does it serve? Are you populating from a web service? – beatgammit Jul 20 '13 at 17:36
  • @tjameson It's there for a reason. If it wasn't there than i would always be the last value. However he is using it wrong as your suppose to pass i as an argument to the function. – Shawn31313 Jul 20 '13 at 17:40
13

The other answers are correct in that you need to pass i into your anonymous function, but you could also do this with ES5 Getters and Setters:

// Create a new User object that accept an object of properties
function User(properties) {
    var self = this; // make sure we can access this inside our anon function
    for (var i in properties) {
        (function(i) {
            Object.defineProperty(self, i, {
                // Create a new getter for the property
                get: function () {
                    return properties[i];
                },
                // Create a new setter for the property
                set: function (val) {
                    properties[i] = val;
                }
            })
        })(i);
    }
}

The benefit of using ES5 getters and setters is that now you can do this:

var user = new User({name: 'Bob'});
user.name; // Bob
user.name = 'Dan';
user.name; // Dan

Since they're functions, they modify the passed in properties, not just the object itself. You don't have to use getN or setN anymore, you can just use .N, which makes using it look more like accessing properties on an object.

This approach, however, isn't universally portable (requires IE 9+).

Here's what I'd probably do in practice though:

function User(properties) {
    Object.keys(properties).forEach(function (prop) {
        Object.defineProperty(this, prop, {
            // Create a new getter for the property
            get: function () {
                return properties[prop];
            },
            // Create a new setter for the property
            set: function (val) {
                properties[prop] = val;
            }
        })
    }, this);
}

The above gets rid of your for loop. You're already using an anonymous function, so might as well get the most of it.

4
  • A nice side-effect is that you can't accidentally assign over the top: user.setname = 'Dan'. Not really a big issue, but I've seen people accidentally do that and wonder why their their code broke. – beatgammit Jul 20 '13 at 18:06
  • I've added what I consider to be better style. for .. in can cause weird problems (probably not in this case though), and I think Array.forEach is mor elegant anyway. – beatgammit Jul 20 '13 at 18:10
  • @tjameson ES5 getters and setters are great, but if you're doing nothing more than mirroring, I don't see the point over just using an Object. – Paul S. Jul 20 '13 at 18:10
  • @PaulS. This can be useful if you want to use properties wholesale later (e.g. upload to a server) without allowing extra properties to be attached. Maybe the OP has other properties on User that only make sense in the web app and not in a potentially later POST to the server. But I agree, the OP said nothing about why he/she wanted this. – beatgammit Jul 20 '13 at 18:12
2

Probably a closure issue:

function User(properties) {
    // Iterate through the properties of the object, and make
    // sure it's properly scoped
    for (var i in properties) { 
        (function(i){
            // Create a new getter for the property
            this['get' + i] = function() {
                return properties[i];
            };

            // Create a new setter for the property
            this['set' + i] = function(val) {
                properties[i] = val;
            };
        }.call(this, i));
    }
}

Also, as @Paul pointed out, this was actually referring to the function which was contained in the for loop. Not the User function. I fixed that by using a call and assigning the User this to the function (no need for extra variable).

5
  • Thanks. This looks quite elegant. But I don't understand why using call works? What's the essence of 'call'? – Rex Jul 20 '13 at 17:49
  • call allows you to define this. .call(this, i) the this in the call function is referring to the this of the user function. That is then passed on to the function. It is equal to using something like .bind(this)(i). Only difference is that call triggers the function and allows you to set the arguments within the function. – Shawn31313 Jul 20 '13 at 17:53
  • It's an issue with closures. I am the worst with explaining closures. If you wouldn't pass i to call to use it in the function. i would always equal the last property in the Object. – Shawn31313 Jul 20 '13 at 18:07
  • I thought the anonymous function already handled the 'last i' problem. – Rex Jul 20 '13 at 18:12
  • Well no, it doesn't fix it unless you pass i as an argument. Without passing argument: jsfiddle.net/shawn31313/zU7cE. With passing argument: jsfiddle.net/shawn31313/zU7cE/1 – Shawn31313 Jul 20 '13 at 18:16
1

Your in-loop function is losing the this, do a var t = this; outside loop and refer to t inside. Also, pass i into your function.

function User(properties) {
    var t = this, i;
    for (i in properties) (function (i) {
        t['get' + i] = function () { return properties[i]; };
        t['set' + i] = function (val) { properties[i] = val; };
    }(i));
}
1
  • This is a great solution. Thanks. – Rex Jul 20 '13 at 17:50

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