7

I tried researching this but still have no answer for it. A program my friend designed writes to the MySQL db passwords using the MySQL password() function.

I am looking for a way to use this through the web front I designed but still have no luck. Does anyone have any suggestions?

The passwords look just like this example

mysql> SET old_passwords = 0;
mysql> SELECT PASSWORD('mypass');
+-------------------------------------------+
| PASSWORD('mypass')                        |
+-------------------------------------------+
| *6C8989366EAF75BB670AD8EA7A7FC1176A95CEF4 |
+-------------------------------------------+

I just need to figure out how to turn this into a function i.e function password_hash

Here's the rest the login query for an example

if (isset($_POST["username"], $_POST["password"], $_POST[$CONF["LOGIN_SIGNAL_TRIGGER"]])) {

    /*
        If we got a login signal, a password and a username, we will
        proceed to check login information. We will first extract
        the user row from the db.
    */
    $user = myF(myQ("
        SELECT `username`,`password`,`id`,`disable_until`,`active`
        FROM `[x]users` 
        WHERE LCASE(`username`)='".strtolower($_POST["username"])."'
    "));

    if (!$user["id"]) $GLOBALS["LOGIN_FAIL_TYPE"] = "e.user";
    elseif ($user["active"] != 1 && $CONF["LOGIN_REQUIRE_ACTIVE"]) $GLOBALS["LOGIN_FAIL_TYPE"] = "e.active";

    else {
        /*
            If the user's account 'disabled' value is greater than 
            the actual date value, and that the bruteforce protection
            system is enabled, we will show an error message
        */
        if (($user["disable_until"] > date("U")) && ($CONF["LOGIN_BRUTEFORCE_PROTECT:ENABLE"])) {
             $GLOBALS["LOGIN_FAIL_TYPE"] = "e.bruteforce";
            (isset($_SESSION["loginFailCount"])?session_unregister('loginFailCount'):false);
        }

        /*
            Account is not disabled
        */
        else {
            if ((isset($_SESSION["loginFailCount"])) && ($_SESSION["loginFailCount"] > $CONF["LOGIN_BRUTEFORCE_FAILCOUNT"])) {

                myQ("UPDATE `[x]users`
                    SET `disable_until` = ".(date("U")+$CONF["LOGIN_BRUTEFORCE_DISABLE_DURATION"])."
                    WHERE LCASE(`username`)='".strtolower($_POST["username"])."'
                    LIMIT 1"
                );

                (isset($_SESSION["loginFailCount"])?session_unregister('loginFailCount'):false);
                $GLOBALS["LOGIN_FAIL_TYPE"] = "e.bruteforce";
            }

            else {

                /*
                    All the information correct, we will proceed to login
                */
                if ($user["password"] == md5(trim($_POST["password"]))) {
                    $_SESSION["id"] = (integer)$user["id"];

                    session_write_close();

                    /*
                        Update the last login key
                    */
                    $me_last_login = me("last_login");
                    myQ("UPDATE `[x]users` SET `last_login`='".date("U")."' WHERE `id`='".me('id')."'");

                    /*
                        Route the user
                    */
                    if (!$GLOBALS["WAP_MODE"]) {
                        header("Location: ".(!$me_last_login?$CONF["LOGIN_FIRST_ROUTE_TO"]:$CONF["LOGIN_ROUTE_TO"]));
                    } else header("Location: {$CONF["WAP_LOGIN_ROUTE_TO"]}");

                } 

                else {
                    (isset($_SESSION["loginFailCount"])?$_SESSION["loginFailCount"]++:$_SESSION["loginFailCount"]=1);
                    $GLOBALS["LOGIN_FAIL_TYPE"] = "e.password";
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

if ((isset($_GET[$CONF["LOGOUT_SIGNAL_TRIGGER"]])) && (!isset($_POST[$CONF["LOGIN_SIGNAL_TRIGGER"]]))) {

    /*
        Handle admin swapping
    */
    if (isset($_SESSION["swap_id"])) {
        $_SESSION["id"] = $_SESSION["swap_id"];
        session_unregister("swap_id");
        header("Location: ?L=admin.index");
    }

    else {
        (isset($_SESSION["id"])?session_unregister('id'):false);
        (isset($_SESSION["SELF_USER_DATA"])?session_unregister('SELF_USER_DATA'):false);

        header("Location: {$CONF["LOGOUT_ROUTE_TO"]}");
    }
}
  • possible duplicate of What kind of hash does mysql use? – Barmar Jul 20 '13 at 21:42
  • 1
    Use it for what? If you just want to generate the password hash using mysql - execute the same query that's in the question – AD7six Jul 20 '13 at 21:43
  • 1
    @user2603089 From the code you just commented with, it looks like you're not using prepared statements, which leaves a gaping security hole for you. – christopher Jul 20 '13 at 21:52
  • 1
    As linked by @HieuNguyen it's just '*' . sha1(sha1('mypass', true)); - but you could just call the function on the db anyway. and also from the same question The PASSWORD() function is used by the authentication system in MySQL Server; you should not use it in your own applications. – AD7six Jul 20 '13 at 21:52
  • 1
    @AD7six It's the concatenation around the md5 function that makes me think that. Plus we don't know what else is in the query. It could be "WHERE Password = ".mdf($_POST["adminpass"])." AND Username = ."$_POST["adminuser"]; which would still be hugely open to SQL injection. – christopher Jul 20 '13 at 21:56
2

If I understand you correctly there is no need to reproduce PASSWORD() in php do all your validation in one go on mysql side using PASSWORD() in your select like this

SELECT `username`,`password`,`id`,`disable_until`,`active` 
  FROM `[x]users`
 WHERE `username` = 'user1' 
   AND `password` = PASSWORD('password')

Here is SQLFiddle demo

Unless you use case sensitive collation don't use LCASE() on username column in your statements. It prevents MySql from using an index (indices) if any is defined on that column and cause a full scan on the table.

On a side note: your code is vulnerable to sql-injections. Consider to use prepared statements.

  • 6
    There's a security implication of this worth mentioning. In particular, SQL queries can be logged (MySQL's slow query log for example). If you do the hash inside of the query, the password may be written to a log file. (There are other security implications as well, but this is the most urgent.) – Corbin Jul 20 '13 at 22:42
  • The other problem with this is that it will break if MySQL changes the definition of the password function again, like they did in MySQL 4.1. – Gert van den Berg Jul 22 '16 at 9:17
7

OP asked how to do this in php. This is how to do it in php:

function sqlPassword($input) {
    $pass = strtoupper(
            sha1(
                    sha1($input, true)
            )
    );
    $pass = '*' . $pass;
    return $pass;
}

Added for posterity (No reason you would use this, use it if mysql decides to deprecate the PASSWORD function?, for informative purposes only) the mysql equivalent of the php equivalent

SELECT 
  UPPER(
    CONCAT('*', SHA1(UNHEX(SHA1('password'))))
  )

Also see MySQL Hashing Function Implementation

1

Copy-paste from a password encoder interface for a Symfony2 app I wrote that migrated from an old system using the MySQL PASSWORD function:

function mysqlPassword($raw) {
    return '*'.strtoupper(hash('sha1',pack('H*',hash('sha1', $raw))));
}
1

My version of the pre-MySQL 4.1 code.

/* PHP implementation of MySQL pre-4.1 password function.
Based on Perl Crypt::MySQL C code */
function mysql_old_password_hash($password) {
  $len = strlen($password); 
  $add = 7;
  $nr  = 1345345333;
  $nr2 = 0x12345671;
  $tmp = 0;

  foreach (str_split($password) as $chr) {
     if ($chr == " " || $chr == "\t") {
       continue;
     }

     $tmp  = ord($chr);
     $nr  ^= ((($nr & 0x3f)+$add)*$tmp) + ($nr << 8);
     $nr2 += ($nr2 << 8) ^ $nr;
     $nr2 &= 0xffffffff; # We need to limit this to 32-bit
     $add += $tmp;
  }

  // Strip sign bit
  $nr &= 0x7fffffff;
  $nr2 &= 0x7fffffff;
  return sprintf("%08x%08x",$nr,$nr2);
}

For post-4.1, pre-5.7.something versions, look at sjagr or chiliNUT's answers.

The only reason to use this is in order to check passwords in a database that was written in spite of MySQL's advice not to use PASSWORD() for your own applications.

  • 1
    Hmm... Interesting... It works up to 8 characters... Might need to compare with Crypt::MySQL again.... – Gert van den Berg Jul 22 '16 at 8:40
  • 1
    Fixed it, $nr2 extending beyond 32-bit seems to have been the problem... – Gert van den Berg Jul 22 '16 at 8:57
  • 1
    @zx1986: I mainly ported the Crypt::MySQL Perl module's XS (C) code to PHP, and that seems to mainly be based on the MySQL source code... The code is not especially easy to follow... (The character ($tmp) gets mixed into the first part of the hash ($nr), the second part ($nr2) gets affected in an indirect way). Probably not very good crypt.... (Unix crypt is a different function, which is DES based...) – Gert van den Berg Jul 25 '16 at 9:11
  • 1
    @zx1986: The 32-bit issue was mainly checking the C code for what might be different (I know that second part ($nr2) is all that is affected). Noticed their types and though it is worth a try limiting the value with an and. That happened to work... (Had a little test shell function that output the same text encoded via the Perl module, this function and MySQL itself....) – Gert van den Berg Jul 25 '16 at 9:41
  • 1
0

first use mysql_escape_string($_POST['password']) to escape the password.

then use that as a variable inside the sql query in

WHERE password_field = PASSWORD(USER_SUPPLIED_PASSWORD)
-1

Otherwise

SELECT password($_POST["password"]) password2, password ...

if ($user["password"] == $user["password2"])

  • Please format the code using code formatter. – Karthick Ramesh Feb 14 at 3:46

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