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Well, I am familiar with Qt, but when using PyQt, the syntax of signal/slot really confused me. When using C++/Qt, the compiler will give you a hint where you are wrong about the signal/slot, but the PyQt default configuration doesn't give a hint about error. Is there a ways or such as debug trigger mode to enable PyQt to display more information? the Code is as following:

from PyQt4.QtCore import *
from PyQt4.QtGui import *
import time

class workThread(QThread):

    def __init__(self,parent = None):
        super(workThread,self).__init__(parent)
        self.mWorkDoneSignal = pyqtSignal() ## some people say this should be defined as clas member, however, I defined it as class member and still fails.

    def run(self):
        print "workThread start"
        time.sleep(1)
        print "workThread stop"
        print self.emit(SIGNAL("mWorkDoneSignal"))

class MainWidget(QWidget):
    def __init__(self , parent = None):
        super(MainWidget,self).__init__(parent)

    @pyqtSlot()
    def display(self):
        print "dispaly"

if __name__ == "__main__":
    import sys
    app = QApplication(sys.argv)
    c = workThread()
    d = MainWidget()
    ##In Qt, when using QObject::connect or such things, the return value will show the 
    ## signal/slot binding is success or failed
    print QObject.connect(c,SIGNAL('mWorkDoneSignal()'),d,SLOT('display()'))
    c.start()
    d.show()
    app.exec_()

In C++,the QObject::connect return value will show the signal/slot binding is success or not. In PyQt, the return value is True, but it doesn't trigger the slot. My Question: 1) Is the signal shoud be a class member or instance member? 2) If QObject.connect 's return value can't give the hint of the binding is success or not, is there other ways to detect it? I want to bind the signal/slot outside the signal sender and slot receiver, so I perfer to use the QObject.connect ways. But how can I write this correct, I tried the following ways,both fail.

 QObject.connect(c,SIGNAL('mWorkDoneSignal'),d,SLOT('display'))
 QObject.connect(c,SIGNAL('mWorkDoneSignal()'),d,SLOT('display()'))
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First, you should really use new style signals with pyqt. In fact, QObject.connect and QObject.emit will not even be there anymore in PyQt5.

def __init__(self,parent = None):
    super(workThread,self).__init__(parent)
    self.mWorkDoneSignal = pyqtSignal()

This creates an unbound signal and assigns it to a instance variable mWorkDoneSignal, wich dosn't really have an effect. If you want to create an signal, then you really have to declare it on the class.

So if you didn't really create a signal here, then why did this call succeed:

QObject.connect(c,SIGNAL('mWorkDoneSignal()'),d,SLOT('display()'))

The answer lies in the handling of old style signals by PyQt4:

The act of emitting a PyQt4 signal implicitly defines it.

For that reason when you connect a signal to a slot, only the existence of the slot is checked. The signal itself doesn't really need to exist at that point, so the call will always succeed unless the slot doesn't exist.

I tried the following ways,both fail.

QObject.connect(c,SIGNAL('mWorkDoneSignal'),d,SLOT('display'))
QObject.connect(c,SIGNAL('mWorkDoneSignal()'),d,SLOT('display()'))

The first fails because display (without parenthesis) isn't a valid slot.
The second succeeds. The reason it doesn't work is because you emit mWorkDoneSignal, but what you actually need to emit is:

self.emit(SIGNAL("mWorkDoneSignal()"))

Using new style signals, there's no way to mess things like this up:

from utils import sigint
from PyQt4.QtCore import *
from PyQt4.QtGui import *
import time

class workThread(QThread):

    mWorkDoneSignal = pyqtSignal()

    def __init__(self,parent = None):
        super(workThread,self).__init__(parent)

    def run(self):
        print "workThread start"
        time.sleep(1)
        print "workThread stop"
        self.mWorkDoneSignal.emit()

class MainWidget(QWidget):
    def __init__(self , parent = None):
        super(MainWidget,self).__init__(parent)

    @pyqtSlot()
    def display(self):
        print "dispaly"

if __name__ == "__main__":
    import sys
    app = QApplication(sys.argv)
    c = workThread()
    d = MainWidget()
    c.mWorkDoneSignal.connect(d.display)
    c.start()
    d.show()
    app.exec_()

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