73

How do you find the top correlations in a correlation matrix with Pandas? There are many answers on how to do this with R (Show correlations as an ordered list, not as a large matrix or Efficient way to get highly correlated pairs from large data set in Python or R), but I am wondering how to do it with pandas? In my case the matrix is 4460x4460, so can't do it visually.

10 Answers 10

74

You can use DataFrame.values to get an numpy array of the data and then use NumPy functions such as argsort() to get the most correlated pairs.

But if you want to do this in pandas, you can unstack and sort the DataFrame:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np

shape = (50, 4460)

data = np.random.normal(size=shape)

data[:, 1000] += data[:, 2000]

df = pd.DataFrame(data)

c = df.corr().abs()

s = c.unstack()
so = s.sort_values(kind="quicksort")

print so[-4470:-4460]

Here is the output:

2192  1522    0.636198
1522  2192    0.636198
3677  2027    0.641817
2027  3677    0.641817
242   130     0.646760
130   242     0.646760
1171  2733    0.670048
2733  1171    0.670048
1000  2000    0.742340
2000  1000    0.742340
dtype: float64
  • 9
    With Pandas v 0.17.0 and higher you should use sort_values instead of order. You will get an error if you try using the order method. – Friendm1 Sep 5 '17 at 16:06
36

@HYRY's answer is perfect. Just building on that answer by adding a bit more logic to avoid duplicate and self correlations and proper sorting:

import pandas as pd
d = {'x1': [1, 4, 4, 5, 6], 
     'x2': [0, 0, 8, 2, 4], 
     'x3': [2, 8, 8, 10, 12], 
     'x4': [-1, -4, -4, -4, -5]}
df = pd.DataFrame(data = d)
print("Data Frame")
print(df)
print()

print("Correlation Matrix")
print(df.corr())
print()

def get_redundant_pairs(df):
    '''Get diagonal and lower triangular pairs of correlation matrix'''
    pairs_to_drop = set()
    cols = df.columns
    for i in range(0, df.shape[1]):
        for j in range(0, i+1):
            pairs_to_drop.add((cols[i], cols[j]))
    return pairs_to_drop

def get_top_abs_correlations(df, n=5):
    au_corr = df.corr().abs().unstack()
    labels_to_drop = get_redundant_pairs(df)
    au_corr = au_corr.drop(labels=labels_to_drop).sort_values(ascending=False)
    return au_corr[0:n]

print("Top Absolute Correlations")
print(get_top_abs_correlations(df, 3))

That gives the following output:

Data Frame
   x1  x2  x3  x4
0   1   0   2  -1
1   4   0   8  -4
2   4   8   8  -4
3   5   2  10  -4
4   6   4  12  -5

Correlation Matrix
          x1        x2        x3        x4
x1  1.000000  0.399298  1.000000 -0.969248
x2  0.399298  1.000000  0.399298 -0.472866
x3  1.000000  0.399298  1.000000 -0.969248
x4 -0.969248 -0.472866 -0.969248  1.000000

Top Absolute Correlations
x1  x3    1.000000
x3  x4    0.969248
x1  x4    0.969248
dtype: float64
  • 3
    instead of get_redundant_pairs(df), you can use "cor.loc[:,:] = np.tril(cor.values, k=-1)" and then "cor = cor[cor>0]" – Sarah Mar 21 '17 at 5:59
  • 1
    I'm getting erro for line au_corr = au_corr.drop(labels=labels_to_drop).sort_values(ascending=False) : # -- partial selection or non-unique index – stallingOne Jul 6 '18 at 12:46
31

Few lines solution without redundant pairs of variables:

corr_matrix = df.corr().abs()

#the matrix is symmetric so we need to extract upper triangle matrix without diagonal (k = 1)
sol = (corr_matrix.where(np.triu(np.ones(corr_matrix.shape), k=1).astype(np.bool))
                 .stack()
                 .sort_values(ascending=False))
#first element of sol series is the pair with the bigest correlation
  • 1
    probably a bad idea to use os as a variable name because it masks the os from import os if available in the code – shadi Aug 29 '18 at 7:29
  • Thanks for your suggestion, i changed this unproper var name. – MiFi Oct 23 '18 at 9:33
  • 1
    as of 2018 use sort_values(ascending=False) instead of order – Serafins Nov 26 '18 at 21:10
9

Combining some features of @HYRY and @arun's answers, you can print the top correlations for dataframe df in a single line using:

df.corr().unstack().sort_values().drop_duplicates()

Note: the one downside is if you have 1.0 correlations that are not one variable to itself, the drop_duplicates() addition would remove them

  • Wouldn't drop_duplicates drop all correlations that are equal? – shadi Aug 29 '18 at 7:30
  • @shadi yes, you are correct. However, we assume the only correlations which will be identically equal are correlations of 1.0 (i.e. a variable with itself). Chances are that the correlation for two unique pairs of variables (i.e. v1 to v2 and v3 to v4) would not be exactly the same – Addison Klinke Aug 29 '18 at 21:42
3

Use the code below to view the correlations in the descending order.

# See the correlations in descending order

corr = df.corr() # df is the pandas dataframe
c1 = corr.abs().unstack()
c1.sort_values(ascending = False)
  • 1
    Your 2nd line should be: c1 = core.abs().unstack() – Jack Fleeting Dec 20 '18 at 21:23
  • or first line corr = df.corr() – vizyourdata Feb 13 '19 at 16:22
2

Use itertools.combinations to get all unique correlations from pandas own correlation matrix .corr(), generate list of lists and feed it back into a DataFrame in order to use '.sort_values'. Set ascending = True to display lowest correlations on top

corrank takes a DataFrame as argument because it requires .corr().

  def corrank(X):
        import itertools
        df = pd.DataFrame([[(i,j),X.corr().loc[i,j]] for i,j in list(itertools.combinations(X.corr(), 2))],columns=['pairs','corr'])    
        print(df.sort_values(by='corr',ascending=False))

  corrank(X) # prints a descending list of correlation pair (Max on top)
  • 3
    While this code snippet may be the solution, including an explanation really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion. – haindl Sep 22 '17 at 11:06
1

Lot's of good answers here. The easiest way I found was a combination of some of the answers above.

corr = corr.where(np.triu(np.ones(corr.shape), k=1).astype(np.bool))
corr = corr.unstack().transpose()\
    .sort_values(by='column', ascending=False)\
    .dropna()
0

I didn't want to unstack or over-complicate this issue, since I just wanted to drop some highly correlated features as part of a feature selection phase.

So I ended up with the following simplified solution:

# map features to their absolute correlation values
corr = features.corr().abs()

# set equality (self correlation) as zero
corr[corr == 1] = 0

# of each feature, find the max correlation
# and sort the resulting array in ascending order
corr_cols = corr.max().sort_values(ascending=False)

# display the highly correlated features
display(corr_cols[corr_cols > 0.8])

In this case, if you want to drop correlated features, you may map through the filtered corr_cols array and remove the odd-indexed (or even-indexed) ones.

  • This just gives one index (feature) and not something like feature1 feature2 0.98. Change linecorr_cols = corr.max().sort_values(ascending=False) to corr_cols = corr.unstack() – aunsid Oct 8 '19 at 20:17
  • Well the OP did not specify a correlation shape. As I mentioned, I didn't want to unstack, so I just brought a different approach. Each correlation pair is represented by 2 rows, in my suggested code. But thanks for the helpful comment! – falsarella Oct 9 '19 at 23:10
0

I was trying some of the solutions here but then I actually came up with my own one. I hope this might be useful for the next one so I share it here:

def sort_correlation_matrix(correlation_matrix):
    cor = correlation_matrix.abs()
    top_col = cor[cor.columns[0]][1:]
    top_col = top_col.sort_values(ascending=False)
    ordered_columns = [cor.columns[0]] + top_col.index.tolist()
    return correlation_matrix[ordered_columns].reindex(ordered_columns)
0

This is a improve code from @MiFi. This one order in abs but not excluding the negative values.

   def top_correlation (df,n):
    corr_matrix = df.corr()
    correlation = (corr_matrix.where(np.triu(np.ones(corr_matrix.shape), k=1).astype(np.bool))
                 .stack()
                 .sort_values(ascending=False))
    correlation = pd.DataFrame(correlation).reset_index()
    correlation.columns=["Variable_1","Variable_2","Correlacion"]
    correlation = correlation.reindex(correlation.Correlacion.abs().sort_values(ascending=False).index).reset_index().drop(["index"],axis=1)
    return correlation.head(n)

top_correlation(ANYDATA,10)

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