In my script, requests.get never returns:

import requests

print ("requesting..")

# This call never returns!
r = requests.get(
    "http://www.justdial.com",
    proxies = {'http': '222.255.169.74:8080'},
)

print(r.ok)

What could be the possible reason(s)? Any remedy? What is the default timeout that get uses?

  • 1
    @user2357112: Does it matter? I doubt. – Nawaz Jul 22 '13 at 7:34
  • It definitely matters. If you provide the URL you're trying to access and the proxy you're trying to use, we can see what happens when we try to send similar requests. – user2357112 Jul 22 '13 at 7:42
  • 1
    @user2357112: Alright. Edited the question. – Nawaz Jul 22 '13 at 7:44
  • 2
    Your proxy is also incorrect. You must specify it like so: proxies={'http': 'http://222.255.169.74:8080'}. That could be why it isn't completing without a timeout. – Ian Stapleton Cordasco Jul 23 '13 at 13:32
up vote 94 down vote accepted

What is the default timeout that get uses?

The default timeout is None, which means it'll wait (hang) until the connection is closed.

What happens when you pass in a timeout value?

r = requests.get(
    'http://www.justdial.com',
    proxies={'http': '222.255.169.74:8080'},
    timeout=5
)
  • 2
    I think you're right. None means infinite (or "wait until the connection is close"). If I pass timeout myself, it returns! – Nawaz Jul 22 '13 at 8:00
  • Happy it helped! – ron rothman ℝℝ Jul 22 '13 at 8:22
  • 1
    Note: does not work with HTTPS. – User Aug 13 '14 at 17:55
  • 12
    @User timeout works just as fine with https as it does with http – jaapz Jan 9 '15 at 13:37
  • This seems really hard to find in the docs by googling or otherwise. Anyone know where this shows up in the docs? – wordsforthewise Oct 21 '17 at 22:31

From requests documentation:

You can tell Requests to stop waiting for a response after a given number of seconds with the timeout parameter:

>>> requests.get('http://github.com', timeout=0.001)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
requests.exceptions.Timeout: HTTPConnectionPool(host='github.com', port=80): Request timed out. (timeout=0.001)

Note:

timeout is not a time limit on the entire response download; rather, an exception is raised if the server has not issued a response for timeout seconds (more precisely, if no bytes have been received on the underlying socket for timeout seconds).

It happens a lot to me that requests.get() takes a very long time to return even if the timeout is 1 second. There are a few way to overcome this problem:

1. Use the TimeoutSauce internal class

From: https://github.com/kennethreitz/requests/issues/1928#issuecomment-35811896

import requests from requests.adapters import TimeoutSauce

class MyTimeout(TimeoutSauce):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        if kwargs['connect'] is None:
            kwargs['connect'] = 5
        if kwargs['read'] is None:
            kwargs['read'] = 5
        super(MyTimeout, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

requests.adapters.TimeoutSauce = MyTimeout

This code should cause us to set the read timeout as equal to the connect timeout, which is the timeout value you pass on your Session.get() call. (Note that I haven't actually tested this code, so it may need some quick debugging, I just wrote it straight into the GitHub window.)

2. Use a fork of requests from kevinburke: https://github.com/kevinburke/requests/tree/connect-timeout

From its documentation: https://github.com/kevinburke/requests/blob/connect-timeout/docs/user/advanced.rst

If you specify a single value for the timeout, like this:

r = requests.get('https://github.com', timeout=5)

The timeout value will be applied to both the connect and the read timeouts. Specify a tuple if you would like to set the values separately:

r = requests.get('https://github.com', timeout=(3.05, 27))

NOTE: The change has since been merged to the main Requests project.

3. Using evenlet or signal as already mentioned in the similar question: Timeout for python requests.get entire response

  • 4
    You never answered what the default is – User Jul 30 '14 at 15:11
  • The default is 0. – Ricky Wilson Nov 19 '15 at 2:38
  • Quote:You can tell Requests to stop waiting for a response after a given number of seconds with the timeout parameter. Nearly all production code should use this parameter in nearly all requests. Failure to do so can cause your program to hang indefinitely: Note timeout is not a time limit on the entire response download; rather, an exception is raised if the server has not issued a response for timeout seconds (more precisely, if no bytes have been received on the underlying socket for timeout seconds). If no timeout is specified explicitly, requests do not time out. – DDay Aug 15 '17 at 20:34

Reviewed all the answers and came to conclusion that the problem still exists. On some sites requests may hang infinitely and using multiprocessing seems to be overkill. Here's my approach(Python 3.5+):

import asyncio

import aiohttp


async def get_http(url):
    async with aiohttp.ClientSession(conn_timeout=1, read_timeout=3) as client:
        try:
            async with client.get(url) as response:
                content = await response.text()
                return content, response.status
        except Exception:
            pass


loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
task = loop.create_task(get_http('http://example.com'))
loop.run_until_complete(task)
result = task.result()
if result is not None:
    content, status = task.result()
    if status == 200:
        print(content)
  • Is that a legal python code? Since which Python? – Nawaz Nov 4 '17 at 13:20
  • 2
    @Nawaz Python 3.5+. Thank you for the question, updated the answer with Python version. It's legal Python code. Please take a look at aiohttp documentation aiohttp.readthedocs.io/en/stable/index.html – Alex Polekha Nov 4 '17 at 16:13

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.