14

I have seen questions similar to this but not quite the same. I have an expression

if foo == ....
  return -1
elif myFunction(bar) != -1:
  return myFunction(bar)
elif ...

I don't want to calculate myFunction(bar) twice. If it were simply an if, I could do

temp = myFunction(bar)
if temp != -1
  return temp

However doing this with an elif would result in unnecessary calculations of temp if we were to follow the intitial if.

I can see a solution using an

if ...
else
  temp = myFunction(bar)
  if temp != -1:
    return temp
  elif ...

But that now starts to become more ugly. Is there a better way to accomplish this?

  • If you do not want to call myFunction(bar) twice and if you only can/want to call it after checking your foo, then there is no other way than using an intermediate variable to store the result in. There is no magic to get around this basic logical problem :-). I think a solution is not ugly when it reflects the right logic. You just have to be careful where to place the last elif. – Dr. Jan-Philip Gehrcke Jul 22 '13 at 10:55
  • 2
    But the if (at least in the example) contains a return anyway, so you could just use a temporary value and start a new if block. – Volatility Jul 22 '13 at 10:57
7

If you do this a lot, it might pay to have a memoizing decorator around. The only memoizer that is currently in the standard library (for newer Python 3.x) is lru_cache, which is overkill, but shows the general idea:

>>> def func():
...     print("foo")
...     return 1
... 
>>> if func():
...     print(func())
...     
foo
foo
1

Now memoize func:

>>> from functools import lru_cache
>>> func = lru_cache(1)(func)
>>> if func():
...    print(func())
...     
foo
1
  • "If you do this a lot" is the key point here. Otherwise the whole approach is just OTT. – Dr. Jan-Philip Gehrcke Jul 22 '13 at 11:02
7

If you do not want to call myFunction(bar) twice then there is no other way than using an intermediate variable to store the result in. People here start proposing complex caching solutions for this. This can be pretty convenient in extreme cases, but before doing so, let's get back to the basics a bit. You should make proper use of the fact that you want to return from within your conditional blocks. In these situations you can save many elses. What follows now basically is the code block from your question, but without dots, with proper indentation, and with names according to PEP8:

if foo == "bar"
    return -1
elif myfunction(bar) != -1:
    return myfunction(bar)
else
    return None

It can easily be replaced with:

if foo == "bar"
    return -1
t = myfunction(bar)
if t != -1:
    return t
return None

As already stated in another answer, you can call your function twice if it does not affect the performance of your code. The result would look as simple as

if foo == "bar"
    return -1
if myfunction(bar) != -1:
    return myfunction(bar)
return None
1

If your function call is simple enough, you could go with calling twice. Python doesn't have support for assign and compare feature. So, you have to trade off readability/elegance with performance.

0

you could also make a function promise like this:

class Promise():
    def __init__(self, func):
        self.__func = func;
        self.__computed = False;

    def Get(self):
        if not self.__computed:
            self.__result = self.__func()
            self.__computed = True
        return self.__result

def func(text):
    print text
    return 1

    f = Promise(lambda: func("compute"))
    >>> f.Get()     # first call, compute
    compute
    1
    >>> f.Get()     # second call, return result
    1

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