41

I am creating a deploy script for a zend application. The scrip is almost done only I want to verify that a tag exists within the repo to force tags on the team. Currently I have the following code:

# Fist update the repo to make sure all the tags are in
cd /git/repo/path
git pull

# Check if the tag exists in the rev-list. 
# If it exists output should be zero, 
# else an error will be shown which will go to the else statement.
if [ -z "'cd /git/repo/path && git rev-list $1..'" ]; then

    echo "gogo"

else

    echo "No or no correct GIT tag found"    
    exit

fi

Looking forward to your feedback!

Update

When I execute the following in the command line:

cd /git/repo/path && git rev-list v1.4..

I get NO output, which is good. Though when I execute:

cd /git/repo/path && git rev-list **BLA**..

I get an error, which again is good:

fatal: ambiguous argument 'BLA..': unknown revision or path not in the working tree.
Use '--' to separate paths from revisions

The -z in the statement says, if sting is empty then... In other words, it works fine via command line. Though when I use the same command in a shell script inside a statement it does not seem to work.

[ -z "'cd /git/repo/path && git rev-list $1..'" ]

This method what inspired by Validate if commit exists

Update 2

I found the problem:

See Using if elif fi in shell scripts >

sh is interpreting the && as a shell operator. Change it to -a, that’s [’s conjunction operator:

[ "$arg1" = "$arg2" -a "$arg1" != "$arg3" ] Also, you should always quote the variables, because [ gets confused when you leave off arguments.

in other words, I changed the && to ; and simplified the condition. Now it works beautiful.

if cd /path/to/repo ; git rev-list $1.. >/dev/null

then

    echo "gogo"

else
    echo "WRONG"
    exit
fi
  • Is there anything specific you want to ask? – CharlesB Jul 22 '13 at 14:29
  • Yes, it does not work.... – Kim Jul 22 '13 at 14:32
  • Then please add details about what doesn't work, it's easier for people to help – CharlesB Jul 22 '13 at 14:33
  • is the $sha variable defined elsewhere? – CharlesB Jul 22 '13 at 14:35
  • also note that git pull does a merge after updating the references, you'd want to use git fetch instead – CharlesB Jul 22 '13 at 14:35
41

You could use git rev-parse instead:

if GIT_DIR=/path/to/repo/.git git rev-parse $1 >/dev/null 2>&1
then
    echo "Found tag"
else
    echo "Tag not found"
fi

git rev-list invokes graph walking, where git rev-parse would avoid it. The above has some issues with possibly looking up an object instead of a tag. You can avoid that by using ^{tag} following the tag name, but this only works for annotated tags and not lightweight tags:

if GIT_DIR=/path/to/repo/.git git rev-parse "$1^{tag}" >/dev/null 2>&1
then
    echo "Found tag"
else
    echo "Tag not found"
fi

@Lassi also points out that if your tag name begins with a -, then it might get interpreted as an option instead. You can avoid that issue by looking for refs/tags/$1 instead. So in summary, with the rev-parse version, you can look for refs/tags/$1 to get both lightweight and annotated tags, and you can append a ^{tag} to the end to enforce an annotated tag (refs/tags/$1^{tag}).

Also, as mentioned before by @forvaidya, you could simply list the tags and grep for the one you want:

if GIT_DIR=/path/to/repo/.git git show-ref --tags | egrep -q "refs/tags/$1$"
then
    echo "Found tag"
else
    echo "Tag not found"
fi

You can also use git tag --list instead of git show-ref --tags:

if GIT_DIR=/path/to/repo/.git git tag --list | egrep -q "^$1$"
then
    echo "Found tag"
else
    echo "Tag not found"
fi

If you know the tag though, I think it's best just to just look it up via rev-parse. One thing I don't like about the egrep version is that it's possible you could have characters that could get interpreted as regex sequences and either cause a false positive or false negative. The rev-parse version is superior in that sense, and in that it doesn't look at the whole list of tags.

  • Yes, defining the GIT_DIR is a good way! I think they both work. Thanks anyway. – Kim Jul 22 '13 at 17:44
  • The rev-parse option will match a Git "long" tag (generated by git describe), but the second option matches only real tags. Thanks! I don't see any advantage in using git show-ref --tags over git tag --list, though. Does it matter? – big_m Nov 4 '16 at 2:54
  • 1
    @big_m it does not matter. You just need to make sure to match it correctly... so use something like egrep -q "^$1$" to match sure you match the entire entry. – John Szakmeister Nov 4 '16 at 7:34
  • @big_m I updated the answer with an extra block showing how you can use the rev-parse version to only look for a tag. – John Szakmeister Nov 4 '16 at 7:47
  • Thanks for ^{tag} suffix tip, @jszakmeister! Could have sworn I tried that, but apparently not (or not correctly anyway). I just tried it again and it works, just as you say. – big_m Nov 4 '16 at 19:32
35

Here’s an even simpler version of cad106uk’s solution:

version=1.2.3

if [ $(git tag -l "$version") ]; then
    echo yes
else
    echo no
fi

It is not necessary to compare the output of git tag -l with the version number, because the output will be empty if the version is not found. Therefore it’s sufficient to test if there’s any output at all.

Note: The quotes around $version are important to avoid false positives. Because if $version is empty for some reason, git tag -l would just list all tags, and the condition would always be true.

  • 1
    yep, it is as well :) – cad106uk Jul 30 at 14:50
19

Here's the rev-parse version developed further:

tag=whatever
if git rev-parse -q --verify "refs/tags/$tag" >/dev/null; then
    echo "found"
else
    echo "not found"
fi

It appears to be robust:

  • Checks only for a tag, not a branch or a commit hash, etc.
  • Weird tag name input doesn't cause weird behavior:
    • Tag names starting with "-" are not mistaken for command line options
    • Tag names containing slashes or dots are not special
    • Tag names containing whitespace are not special
    • Blank tag name isn't special
  • 3
    Unfortunately, if the $tag string ends with "-q" and a string of 7 or more hex digits (such as in the generated "long" tags from git describe), this will match on the commit hash, even if there's no such tag. The grep option with git tag --list or git show-ref --tags is the only option I've found that avoids this. – big_m Nov 4 '16 at 2:52
4

The solution I quite like which I think is using a more modern version of git (git version 2.7.4)

#!/usr/bin/env bash
cd /to/repo/base;
tagName="Whatever";

if [[ `git tag -l $tagName` == $tagName ]]; then
    echo "yes";
else
    echo "no";
fi
2

Assuming you're in the project root directory...

# Filename: check-for-tag
# Usage:    check-for-tag <TAG_NAME>
# Example:  check-for-tag ticket-123-fix-this-bug
TAG_NAME=$1
git ls-remote --tags 2>/dev/null | grep $TAG_NAME 1>/dev/null
if [ "$?" == 0 ]; then 
   echo "Git tag $TAG_NAME exists."
else  
   echo "Git tag $TAG_NAME does not exist."
fi
0

I use this method to tell if a tag exists for the current revision, to avoid tagging twice.

git_rev_id=$(git -C $REPO_FOLDER rev-parse HEAD)
git_tags=$(git tag)

for git_tag in $git_tags; do
    git_temp_tag=$(git cat-file tag $git_tag | grep $git_rev_id);
    if [ -z "$git_temp_tag" ]
    then
        false; #do nothing
    else
        git_tag_exists=$git_tag
    fi
done

if [ -z "$git_tag_exists" ]
then
  echo "need to make a tag"
else
  echo "Found tag: $git_tag_exits"
fi
0

Very Simple Version(use git ls-remote)

TAG_NAME=$1
git ls-remote --exit-code --tags origin $TAG_NAME || echo 'not found'

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