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I'm having some trouble using a custom enum type in Arduino.

I've read elsewhere that using a header file is necessary for custom type declarations, due to Arduino IDE preprocessing. So, I've done that, but I'm still unable to use my custom type. Here's the relevant portions of my code in my main arduino file (beacon.ino)

#include <beacon.h>

State state;

And in beacon.h:

typedef enum {
  menu,
  output_on,
  val_edit
} State;

But, when I try to compile, I get the following error:

beacon:20: error: 'State' does not name a type

I assume something is wrong about the way I have written or included my header file. But what?

  • You have type error typdef enum { should be typedef enum { (missing e in typedef) – Grijesh Chauhan Jul 22 '13 at 20:02
  • Just wondering, why wasn't there a different compile error? – Jiminion Jul 22 '13 at 20:48
  • Er, yes, the "typdef" was a typo when asking the question. – Logan Williams Jul 22 '13 at 22:04
4

beacon.h should be as follows:

/* filename: .\Arduino\libraries\beacon\beacon.h */

typedef enum State{  // <-- the use of typedef is optional
  menu,
  output_on,
  val_edit
};

with

/* filename: .\Arduino\beacon\beacon.ino */
#include <beacon.h>
State state; // <-- the actual instance
void setup()
{
  state = menu; 
}

void loop()
{
  state = val_edit;
}

Leave the typdef's out and either the trailing instance of "state" off as you are instancing it in the main INO file, or vice verse. Where the above beacon.h file needs to be in users directory .\Arduino\libraries\beacon\ directory and the IDE needs to be restarted to cache its location.

But you could just define it and instance it all at once in the INO

/* filename: .\Arduino\beacon\beacon.ino */

enum State{
  menu,
  output_on,
  val_edit
} state; // <-- the actual instance, so can't be a typedef

void setup()
{
  state = menu;
}

void loop()
{
  state = val_edit;
}

Both compile fine.

You can also use the following:

/* filename: .\Arduino\beacon\beacon2.ino */

typedef enum State{ // <-- the use of typedef is optional.
  menu,
  output_on,
  val_edit
};

State state; // <-- the actual instance

void setup()
{
  state = menu;
}

void loop()
{
  state = val_edit;
}

here the instance is separate from the enum, allowing the enum to be solely a typedef. Where above it is a instance and not typedef.

| improve this answer | |
  • Hey, thanks for your answer. Still having some questions though. 1) When I try to include everything in the INO file as you have done (in fact, using your code), I get the following error: error: expected unqualified-id before '=' token Secondly, I was under the impression that enum x {blah, blah} simply declared an enumerated variable, and wrapping it in a typedef [...] y; simply gave a shorthand way to refer to it with having to say enum x everywhere. But you're saying that typedef enum x {blah, blah} y; is actually instancing it? – Logan Williams Jul 22 '13 at 21:49
  • my bad I left in the typedef on the 2nd example. – mpflaga Jul 23 '13 at 13:58
  • Of enum x {blah, blah} y; the y is an instance. So a later x = y; would be a second instance. – mpflaga Jul 23 '13 at 13:59
  • Thanks! My confusion stemmed from syntactic differences between C and C++, but I'm all sorted out now. – Logan Williams Jul 23 '13 at 17:27

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