Consider the following:

me@mine:~$ cat a.sh 
#!/bin/bash
echo "Lines: " $LINES
echo "Columns: " $COLUMNS
me@mine:~$ ./a.sh 
Lines: 
Columns: 
me@mine:~$ echo "Lines: " $LINES
Lines:  52
me@mine:~$ echo "Columns: " $COLUMNS
Columns:  157
me@mine:~$ 

The variables $LINES and $COLUMNS are shell variables, not environmental variables, and thus are not exported to the child process (but they are automatically updated when I resize the xterm window, even when logged in via ssh from a remote location). Is there a way in which I can let my script know the current terminal size?

EDIT: I need this as a workaround do this problem: vi (as well as vim, less, and similar commands) messes up the screen every time I use it. Changing the terminal is not an option, and thus I'm looking for workarounds (scrolling down $LINES lines surely is not the perfect solution, but at least is better than losing the previous screen)

  • I'd guess you can solve your original problem with a "Ctrl-L" command to vi. – ndim Nov 23 '09 at 14:08
  • @ndim: Thanks for the suggestion, but you should write it on the other question (where I would answer you that it doesn't work) – Davide Nov 23 '09 at 15:16
  • Davide, on whim, I scrolled all the way down to the bottom and found Cy's answer, and I'm really glad I did. You may want to consider switching the answer you accepted. It will help a lot of people who find this question. – mr_carrera Jan 27 at 21:51

11 Answers 11

up vote 71 down vote accepted

You could get the lines and columns from tput:

#!/bin/bash

lines=$(tput lines)
columns=$(tput cols)

echo "Lines: " $lines
echo "Columns: " $columns
  • 4
    For cygwin 1.7 or later you need to install the ncurses package to get tput. – Aleksander Blomskøld May 13 '12 at 12:04
  • 1
    This is should be guarded with: if [ -n "${TERM}" ]; then lines=$(tput lines); else... – MarcH Jan 29 '15 at 4:14
  • 2
    @Aleksander The stty command is included in coreutils on Cygwin, which we can use in place of tput if we don't need to install ncurses. I added an answer with an example. – Cy Rossignol Dec 29 '17 at 1:42
  • on Alpine you'll need ncurses. – webjay Apr 26 at 13:27

Because this question is popular, I want to add a newer answer with a bit of additional information.

Often, on modern systems, the $COLUMNS and $LINES variables are not environment variables. The shell sets these values dynamically after each command and we usually cannot access them from non-interactive scripts. Some programs respect these values if we export them, but this behavior isn't standardized or universally supported.

Bash sets these variables in the scope of the process (not the environment) when we enable the checkwinsize option using:

shopt -s checkwinsize 

Many systems enable this option for us in a default or system-wide startup file (/etc/bashrc or similar), so we need to remember that these variables may not always be available. On some systems, such as Cygwin, this option is not enabled for us, so Bash doesn't set $COLUMNS and $LINES unless we execute the line above or add it to our ~/.bashrc.


When writing non-interactive scripts, we usually don't want to rely on $LINES and $COLUMNS by default (but we can check these to allow a user to override the terminal size manually if desired).

Instead, the stty and tput utilities provide portable means to determine the terminal size from a script (the commands described below are currently undergoing standardization for POSIX).

As shown in the accepted answer by Puppe, we can use tput to gather the terminal size in a pretty straightforward manner:

lines=$(tput lines)
columns=$(tput columns)

Alternatively, the size query for stty gives us the number of terminal rows and columns in one step (output as the number of lines followed by two spaces followed by the number of columns):

size=$(stty size)  # "40  80" for example 

The stty program usually ships with GNU Coreutils, so we can often find it on systems without tput. I sometimes prefer the stty approach because we invoke one fewer command and subshell (expensive on Cygwin), but it does require that we parse the output into rows and columns, which may be less readable:

lines=${size% *}
columns=${size#* }

Both of the approaches described above work in any POSIX shell. For Bash in particular, we can use process substitution to simplify the previous example:

read lines columns < <(stty size) 

...which runs faster than the tput example, but still slower than the first stty implementation, at least on my machine. In practice, the performance impact is probably negligible—choose the approach that works best for the program (or based on which command is available on the target system).


If, for some reason, we still want to use $LINES and $COLUMNS in our scripts, we can configure Bash to export these variables to the environment:

trap 'export LINES COLUMNS' DEBUG

The Bash DEBUG trap executes before each command entered at the prompt, so we can use it to export these variables. By re-exporting them with each command, we ensure that the environment variables remain up-to-date if the terminal size changes. Add this line to .bashrc along with the checkwinsize option shown above. It works fine for personal scripts, but I don't recommend using these variables in any script that will be shared.

  • 1
    Fantastic answer. Finally understood why systems behave so different...Logged in only to upvote this - and to hint a small error: You reverted lines and columns when matching the size output, should be .e.g. lines=${size#* }. size outputs first lines then columns. – Red Pill Jan 13 at 14:12
  • @RedPill I'm a fool :) checked this out on an actual computer instead of my phone, and I was just misreading the values. In fact, the POSIX proposal defines the format as "%1dΔ%1d\n", <rows>, <columns>, so we can rely on the assumption that stty outputs rows first, then columns. I'll update the answer...thanks! – Cy Rossignol Jan 15 at 14:46
  • whew, np & I have to thank ;-) – Red Pill Jan 15 at 19:08
eval $( resize )

does that job...(on xterm-based terminal)

kill -s WINCH $$

does set the variables.

  • I don't think that's what he's searching for – Nikana Reklawyks Oct 5 '12 at 18:31
  • 2
    Interesting nevertheless. – Alfe Sep 6 '13 at 9:14

Have you tried making your shebang say:

#!/bin/bash -i
  • Also, see my answer to the question you referenced. Setting the t_ti variable to null may help with vim. stackoverflow.com/questions/630519/… – Dennis Williamson Nov 23 '09 at 1:00
  • Unfortunately, #!/bin/bash -i does not make any difference neither in AIX nor in linux – Davide Nov 23 '09 at 1:51
  • 1
    I get blank output from your script without the -i and correct numbers with it. This is on Ubuntu (LINES and COLUMNS are not exported). I found that on Cygwin, I had to export the two variables (you could do this in ~/.bashrc) in order to get it to work and the -i wasn't needed. However, I had to do kill -SIGWINCH $$ at the Bash prompt to get the values to update if I resized the window (for Cygwin). – Dennis Williamson Nov 23 '09 at 2:34
  • Ubuntu what? On Hardy Haron, -i does not make any difference: blank output with or without it (anyway, I need this on AIX, not Ubuntu) – Davide Nov 23 '09 at 15:12
  • 1
    Bad idea, since for bash, the -i option means the shell is interactive. So this has side effects like running your ~/.bashrc file. – MarkHu Jun 21 '12 at 20:30

Running help export might help?

me@mine:~$ cat a.sh 
#!/bin/bash
echo "Lines: " $LINES
echo "Columns: " $COLUMNS
me@mine:~$ ./a.sh 
Lines: 
Columns: 
me@mine:~$ echo "Lines: " $LINES
Lines:  52
me@mine:~$ echo "Columns: " $COLUMNS
Columns:  157
me@mine:~$ export LINES COLUMNS
me@mine:~$ ./a.sh 
Lines:  52
Columns:  157
me@mine:~$ 
  • 1
    Not sure why this was downvoted. I have export LINES=$LINES and export COLUMNS=$COLUMNS in my bashrc, and that works correctly for me. You don't have to mess with tput. – tandrewnichols Jan 2 '17 at 15:19

$LINES and $COLUMNS in bash is just a shell-y wrapper around the TTY ioctls giving you the size of the TTY and the signals sent by the terminal every time that size changes.

You could write a program in some other language which calls those ioctls directly to get to the TTY dimensions, and then use that program.

EDIT: Well, turns out that program already exists, and is called tput. Vote up Puppe's tput based answer.

For the sake of completion, let me mention that setting the 'checkwinsize' option is exactly what the OP is looking for, but there is a catch. It is by default unset in non-interactive scripts, but you can elect to add the following line at the beginning of any script to enable it :

shopt -s checkwinsize

Unfortunately, the LINES and COLUMNS variables are not set immediately upon setting the option (at least the last time I tried). Instead, you need to force Bash to wait for a subshell to complete, at which point it will set those variables. The full Bash-only solution to this problem is thus to start your script with the following line :

shopt -s checkwinsize; (:;:)

You can then use the LINES and COLUMNS variables to your heart's content, and they will be reset to the correct values each time the terminal is resized, without needing to call any external utilities.

#!/bin/bash -i

-i works now with bash 4.2.10(1)-release on Ubuntu 11.10.

$ cat show_dimensions.sh 
#!/bin/bash -i
printf "COLUMNS = %d\n" $COLUMNS
printf "LINES = %d\n" $LINES

$ ./show_dimensions.sh 
COLUMNS = 150
LINES = 101

$ bash --version
GNU bash, version 4.2.10(1)-release (x86_64-pc-linux-gnu)
Copyright (C) 2011 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later <http://gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html>

This is free software; you are free to change and redistribute it.
There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.

The numbers do change with a window resize; a trap reveals the script is getting a SIGWINCH.

  • Under Cygwin (mintty) and 4.1.10(4)-release LINES/COLUMNS are still empty, but tput works. – Andreas Spindler Feb 13 '13 at 14:27

Why not use enviroment variables on exec command like this:

docker exec -ti -e LINES=$LINES -e COLUMNS=$COLUMNS  container /bin/bash

My experince that you should start the script by the '. script_to_run' form, instead of the 'scritp_to_run'. A simple check as follows:

'(( ${#COLUMNS} )) || { echo "Try start like '. name'" ; return 1 ; }
  • 1
    This way of execution is called sourcing and . command is called source. Not all scripts are written to support this way of execution. E.g. when the script calls exit, the whole shell that sourced the script exits, not only the script. See What is the difference between sh and source?. – Palec Jan 28 at 14:04

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