10

I wrote wlan manager script to handle open/ad-hoc/wep/wpa2 networks. Now im trying to parse iw wlan0 scan output to get nice scan feature to my script. My goal is to get output like this :

SSID        channel     signal      encryption
wlan-ap     6           70%         wpa2-psk
test        1           55%         wep

What i have achived already is output like this :

$ iw wlan0 scan | grep 'SSID\|freq\|signal\|capability' | tac
SSID: Koti783
signal: -82.00 dBm
capability: ESS Privacy ShortPreamble SpectrumMgmt ShortSlotTime (0x0531)
freq: 2437

I have been trying to study bash/sed/awk but havent found yet a way to achieve what im trying. So what is good way to achieve that?

  • 1
    the input provides no sufficient information to achieve that output – hek2mgl Jul 23 '13 at 12:15
  • 1
    Please note that iw's own help page reads "Do NOT screenscrape this tool, we don't consider its output stable." – Bryce Mar 11 '16 at 19:13
11

Here is my final solution based of Sudo_O answer:

$1 == "BSS" {
    MAC = $2
    wifi[MAC]["enc"] = "Open"
}
$1 == "SSID:" {
    wifi[MAC]["SSID"] = $2
}
$1 == "freq:" {
    wifi[MAC]["freq"] = $NF
}
$1 == "signal:" {
    wifi[MAC]["sig"] = $2 " " $3
}
$1 == "WPA:" {
    wifi[MAC]["enc"] = "WPA"
}
$1 == "WEP:" {
    wifi[MAC]["enc"] = "WEP"
}
END {
    printf "%s\t\t%s\t%s\t\t%s\n","SSID","Frequency","Signal","Encryption"

    for (w in wifi) {
        printf "%s\t\t%s\t\t%s\t%s\n",wifi[w]["SSID"],wifi[w]["freq"],wifi[w]["sig"],wifi[w]["enc"]
    }
}'

Output:

$ sudo iw wlan0 scan | awk -f scan.awk
SSID        Frequency   Signal      Encryption
netti       2437        -31.00 dBm  Open
Koti783     2437        -84.00 dBm  WPA
WLAN-AP     2462        -85.00 dBm  WPA
  • 1
    Nice work, glad you managed to get a full solution and post the answer back for everybody +1. Now you have enough reputation you can +1 my solution :) – Chris Seymour Jul 26 '13 at 12:12
  • 1
    There is no "WEP" IE, so your solution does not work to detect WEP encryption. – Léo Germond Oct 29 '14 at 17:01
  • As @nicolas-marchildon mentioned above, you need to install gawk in the Raspberry Pi to be able to run this. – Jordan Feb 18 '17 at 15:00
  • I wrote a script based off this one. Not perfect and it might have some bugs, but it works okay for my use case: gist.github.com/miyalys/dfc052607e729e1a6c845d28c1cb0488 – miyalys Oct 8 '18 at 11:32
  • 1
    For the sake of completion, the ' in the code is to be removed to make it runnable. Also, the code does not work with mawk, check with sudo update-alternatives --config awk to see what you are running or just with awk --version – Mazze May 22 at 13:53
5

Here is an GNU awk script to get you going that grabs the SSIDs and the channel for each unique BSS:

/^BSS / {
    MAC = $2
}
/SSID/ {
    wifi[MAC]["SSID"] = $2
}
/primary channel/ {
    wifi[MAC]["channel"] = $NF
}

# Insert new block here

END {
    printf "%s\t\t%s\n","SSID","channel"

    for (w in wifi) {
        printf "%s\t\t%s\n",wifi[w]["SSID"],wifi[w]["channel"]
    }
}

It should be easy for you to add the new blocks for signal and encryption considering all the studying you have been doing.

Save the script to file such as wifi.awk and run like:

$ sudo iw wlan0 scan | awk -f wifi.awk

The output will be in the formatted requested:

SSID        channel
wlan-ap     6
test        1
  • Thats very nice and useful. Thank you. I just cant find out how to show the AP:s encryption. – Ari Malinen Jul 26 '13 at 8:55
  • 2
    This is great if you are lucky to use gawk instead of traditional Awk. The awk command in OpenWrt comes from Busybox and does not support multidimensional arrays. – Nicolas Marchildon Sep 24 '14 at 3:33
5

it's generally bad practice to try parsing complex output of programs intended for humans to read (rather than machines to parse).

e.g. the output of iw might change depending on the language settings of the system and/or the version of iw, leaving you with a "manager" that only works on your development machine.

instead you might use the same interface that iw uses to get it's information: the library backend libnl

you might also want to have a look at the wireless-tools (iwconfig, iwlist,...) that use the libiw library.

  • Let me correct. iw uses libnl library. – Ari Malinen Aug 7 '13 at 12:50
  • @AriMalinen indeed, thanks: i updated my answer accordingly – umläute Aug 7 '13 at 13:55
  • Please note that iw's own help page reads "Do NOT screenscrape this tool, we don't consider its output stable." – Bryce Mar 11 '16 at 19:51
  • Thanks for pointing to libnl. Also the following libnl example in Python might be relevant for those reluctant to compile things github.com/Robpol86/libnl/blob/master/… – mlt May 7 '18 at 19:32
4

Here is a simple Bash function which uses exclusively Bash internals and spawns only one sub-shell:

#!/bin/bash 
function iwScan() {
   # disable globbing to avoid surprises
   set -o noglob
   # make temporary variables local to our function
   local AP S
   # read stdin of the function into AP variable
   while read -r AP; do
     ## print lines only containing needed fields
     [[ "${AP//'SSID: '*}" == '' ]] && printf '%b' "${AP/'SSID: '}\n"
     [[ "${AP//'signal: '*}" == '' ]] && ( S=( ${AP/'signal: '} ); printf '%b' "${S[0]},";)
   done
   set +o noglob
}

iwScan <<< "$(iw wlan0 scan)"

Output:

-66.00,FRITZ!Box 7312
-56.00,ALICE-WLAN01
-78.00,o2-WLAN93
-78.00,EasyBox-7A2302
-62.00,dlink
-74.00,EasyBox-59DF56
-76.00,BELAYS_Network
-82.00,o2-WLAN20
-82.00,BPPvM

The function can be easily modified to provide additional fields by adding a necessary filter into the while read -r AP while-loop, eg:

[[ "${AP//'last seen: '*}" == '' ]] && ( S=( ${AP/'last seen: '} ); printf '%b' "${S[0]},";)

Output:

-64.00,1000,FRITZ!Box 7312
-54.00,492,ALICE-WLAN01
-76.00,2588,o2-WLAN93
-78.00,652,LN8-Gast
-72.00,2916,WHITE-BOX
-66.00,288,ALICE-WLAN
-78.00,800,EasyBox-59DF56
-80.00,720,EasyBox-7A2302
-84.00,596,ALICE-WLAN08
2

I am using such solution for openwrt:

wlan_scan.sh

#!/bin/sh
sudo iw dev wlan0 scan | awk -f wlan_scan.awk | sort

wlan_scan.awk

/^BSS/ {
    mac = gensub ( /^BSS[[:space:]]*([0-9a-fA-F:]+).*?$/, "\\1", "g", $0 );
}
/^[[:space:]]*signal:/ {
    signal = gensub ( /^[[:space:]]*signal:[[:space:]]*(\-?[0-9.]+).*?$/, "\\1", "g", $0 );
}
/^[[:space:]]*SSID:/ {
    ssid = gensub ( /^[[:space:]]*SSID:[[:space:]]*([^\n]*).*?$/, "\\1", "g", $0 );
    printf ( "%s %s %s\n", signal, mac, ssid );
}

result

-62.00 c8:64:c7:54:d9:05 a
-72.00 70:72:3c:1c:af:17 b
-81.00 78:f5:fd:be:33:cb c
0

There is a bug in the awk script above.

The following code will not work if the SSID has spaces in the name. The received result will be the first token of the SSID name only.

$1 == "SSID:" {
    wifi[MAC]["SSID"] = $2
}

When printing $0, $1, $2:

$0:     SSID: DIRECT-82-HP OfficeJet 8700
$1: SSID:
$2: DIRECT-82-HP

One possibly solution is to take a substr of $0 which contains leading spaces, the token "SSID: " and the provided multi-token network name.

Any other suggestions?

  • This is hardly an answer to the question, but rather a followup question to a specific answer. – miyalys Oct 8 '18 at 11:29
0

I've taken awk code from Ari Malinen and reworked it a bit, because iw output is not stable and changes, also there are other issues like spaces in SSID. I put it on github in case if I'll change it in the future.

#!/usr/bin/env awk -f

$1 ~ /^BSS/ {
    if($2 !~ /Load:/) { #< Escape "BBS Load:" line
        gsub("(\\(.*|:)", "", $2)
        MAC = toupper($2)
        wifi[MAC]["enc"] = "OPEN"
        wifi[MAC]["WPS"] = "no"
        wifi[MAC]["wpa1"] = ""
        wifi[MAC]["wpa2"] = ""
        wifi[MAC]["wep"] = ""
    }
}
$1 == "SSID:" {
    # Workaround spaces in SSID
    FS=":" #< Changing field separator on ":", it should be
           #  forbidded sign for SSID name
    $0=$0
    sub(" ", "", $2) #< remove first whitespace
    wifi[MAC]["SSID"] = $2
    FS=" "
    $0=$0
}
$1 == "capability:" {
    for(i=2; i<=NF; i++) {
        if($i ~ /0x[0-9]{4}/) {
            gsub("(\\(|\\))", "", $i)
            if (and(strtonum($i), 0x10)) 
                wifi[MAC]["wep"] = "WEP"
        }
    }
}
$1 == "WPA:" {
    wifi[MAC]["wpa1"] = "WPA1"
}
$1 == "RSN:" {
    wifi[MAC]["wpa2"] = "WPA2"
}
$1 == "WPS:" {
    wifi[MAC]["WPS"] = "yes"
}
$1 == "DS" {
    wifi[MAC]["Ch"] = $5
}
$1 == "signal:" {
    match($2, /-([0-9]{2})\.00/, m)
    wifi[MAC]["Sig"] = m[1]
}
$1 == "TSF:" {
    gsub("(\\(|d|,)", "", $4)
    match($5, /([0-9]{2}):([0-9]{2}):/, m)
    day = $4
    hour = m[1]
    min = m[2]
    wifi[MAC]["TSF"] = day"d"hour"h"min"m"
}
END {
    for (w in wifi) {
        if (wifi[w]["wep"]) {
            if (wifi[w]["wpa1"] || wifi[w]["wpa2"])
                wifi[w]["enc"] = wifi[w]["wpa1"]wifi[w]["wpa2"]
            else
                wifi[w]["enc"] = "WEP"
        }
        printf "%s:%s:%s:%s:%s:%s:%s\n", w, wifi[w]["SSID"], wifi[w]["enc"], \
               wifi[w]["WPS"], wifi[w]["Ch"], wifi[w]["Sig"], wifi[w]["TSF"]
    }
}

Output:

A5FEF2C499BB:test-ssid2:OPEN:no:9:43:0d00h00m
039EFACA9A8B:test-ssid2:WPA1:no:9:33:0d00h00m
038BF3C1988B:test-ssid2:WPA2:no:9:35:0d00h00m
028EF3C2997B:test-ssid2:WPA1:no:9:35:0d00h03m

if you wonder what if($2 !~ /Load:/) does, well on some routers there might be "BSS Load:" string.

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