27

I have a list of tuples:

List<Tuple<int, string, int>> people = new List<Tuple<int, string, int>>();

Using a dataReader, I may populate this list with various values:

people.Add(new Tuple<int, string, int>(myReader.GetInt32(4), myReader.GetString(3), myReader.GetInt32(5)));

But then how do I loop through, getting each individual value. For example I may want to read the 3 details for a specific person. Lets say there is an ID, a name and a phone number. I want something like the following:

        for (int i = 0; i < people.Count; i++)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(people.Item1[i]); //the int
            Console.WriteLine(people.Item2[i]); //the string
            Console.WriteLine(people.Item3[i]); //the int       
        }
  • people[i].Item1, people[i].Item2, people[i].Item3 – Darren Kopp Jul 23 '13 at 15:45
25

people is a list, so you index into the list first, and then you can reference whatever item you want.

for (int i = 0; i < people.Count; i++)
{
    people[i].Item1;
    // Etc.
}

Just keep in mind the types that you're working with, and these kinds of mistakes will be few and far between.

people;          // Type: List<T> where T is Tuple<int, string, int>
people[i];       // Type: Tuple<int, string, int>
people[i].Item1; // Type: int
  • 2
    Quickest answer wins the prize – Wayneio Jul 23 '13 at 15:58
13

You're indexing the wrong object. people is the array that you want to index, not Item1. Item1 is simply a value on any given object in the people collection. So you'd do something like this:

for (int i = 0; i < people.Count; i++)
{
    Console.WriteLine(people[i].Item1); //the int
    Console.WriteLine(people[i].Item2); //the string
    Console.WriteLine(people[i].Item3); //the int       
}

As an aside, I highly recommend you create an actual object to hold these values instead of a Tuple. It makes the rest of the code (such as this loop) much more clear and easy to work with. It could be something as simple as:

class Person
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int SomeOtherValue { get; set; }
}

Then the loop is greatly simplified:

foreach (var person in people)
{
    Console.WriteLine(person.ID);
    Console.WriteLine(person.Name);
    Console.WriteLine(person.SomeOtherValue);
}

No need for comments explaining what the values mean at this point, the values themselves tell you what they mean.

  • Good advice, thanks – Wayneio Jul 23 '13 at 15:58
3

Is this all you're looking for?

for (int i = 0; i < people.Count; i++)
{
    Console.WriteLine(people[i].Item1);
    Console.WriteLine(people[i].Item2);
    Console.WriteLine(people[i].Item3);       
}

or using a foreach:

foreach (var item in people) 
{
    Console.WriteLine(item.Item1);
    Console.WriteLine(item.Item2);
    Console.WriteLine(item.Item3);
}
2

You got to change where your indexer is, you have to put it like this:

for (int i = 0; i < people.Count; i++)
{
    Console.WriteLine(people[i].Item1); //the int
    Console.WriteLine(people[i].Item2); //the string
    Console.WriteLine(people[i].Item3); //the int       
}

There you go!!

1

Try this:

for (int i = 0; i < people.Count; i++)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(people[i].Item1); //the int
        Console.WriteLine(people[i].Item2); //the string
        Console.WriteLine(people[i].Item3); //the int       
    }
1

You need to move the indexer back a bit:

for (int i = 0; i < people.Count; i++)
{
    Console.WriteLine(people[i].Item1); //the int
    Console.WriteLine(people[i].Item2); //the string
    Console.WriteLine(people[i].Item3); //the int       
}
0
class Ctupple
{
    List<Tuple<int, string, DateTime>> tupple_list = new List<Tuple<int, string, DateTime>>();
    public void create_tupple()
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++)
        {
            tupple_list.Add(new Tuple<int, string, DateTime>(i, "Dump", DateTime.Now));
        }
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        foreach (var v in tupple_list)
        {
            sb.Append(v.Item1);
            sb.Append("    ");
            sb.Append(v.Item2);
            sb.Append("    ");
            sb.Append(v.Item3);
            sb.Append(Environment.NewLine);
        }
        Console.WriteLine(sb.ToString());
        int j = 0;
    }
    public void update_tupple()
    {
        var vt = tupple_list.Find(s => s.Item1 == 10);
        int index = tupple_list.IndexOf(vt);
        vt = new Tuple<int, string, DateTime>(vt.Item1, "New Value" , vt.Item3);
        tupple_list.RemoveAt(index);
        tupple_list.Insert(index,vt);
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        foreach (var v in tupple_list)
        {
            sb.Append(v.Item1);
            sb.Append("    ");
            sb.Append(v.Item2);
            sb.Append("    ");
            sb.Append(v.Item3);
            sb.Append(Environment.NewLine);
        }
        Console.WriteLine(sb.ToString());
    }

}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.