9

I'm trying to evaluate multiple lines of shell commands using eval, but when I try to resolve variables with eval separated by a newline \n the variables are not resolved.

x='echo a'
y='echo b'
z="$x\n$y"
eval $x
eval $y
eval $z

Which outputs:

a
b
anecho b

The last command gives anecho b, and apparently \n was treated as n there. So is there a way to evaluate multiple lines of commands (say, separated by \n)?

  • 3
    Try separating with ;, not \n – Drew McGowen Jul 23 '13 at 21:19
  • 1
    or with &&, if you want to make sure the later cmd gets exec if the previous ran successfully. – Kent Jul 23 '13 at 21:24
  • @Kent && does not work if a previous command is incomplete, e.g. x='if true'; y='then echo a; fi' – Yihui Xie Jul 23 '13 at 22:08
  • @Yihui oh, yes, in that case, && won't work. I thought the commands are complete. btw, read your homepage. :) ZhuNiHaoYun! – Kent Jul 23 '13 at 22:12
9
0

\n is not a newline; it's an escape sequence that in some situations will be translated into a newline, but you haven't used it in one of those situations. The variable $z doesn't wind up containing a newline, just backslash followed by "n". As a result, this is what's actually being executed:

$ echo a\necho b
anecho b

You can either use a semicolon instead (which requires no translation), or use \n in a context where it will be translated into a newline:

$ newline=$'\n'
$ x='echo a'
$ y='echo b'
$ z="$x$newline$y"
$ eval "$z"
a
b

Note the double-quotes around "$z" -- they're actually critical here. Without them, bash will word-split the value of $z, turning all whitespace (spaces, tabs, newlines) into word breaks. If that happens, eval will receive the words "echo" "a" "echo" b", effectively turning the newline into a space:

$ eval $z
a echo b

This is yet another in the long list of cases where it's important to double-quote variable references.

| improve this answer | |
  • excellent! thanks for the $newline trick and explaining the double quotes – Yihui Xie Jul 25 '13 at 3:45
5
0

You are passing the newline into eval. So it's like you are on the console typing this:

el@voyager$ echo a\necho b
anecho b

So the first echo is understood correctly, and it thinks you want quotes around the rest. The backslash seems to be ignored. Perhaps you meant something like this:

el@voyager$ echo -e 'a\n'; echo b
a

b

Option 1:

delimit statements passed into eval with a semicolon like this:

x='echo a'
y='echo b'
z="$x;$y"
eval $x
eval $y
eval $z

prints:

a
b
a
b

Option 2:

Put the newline in the place where it will be interpreted by the echo, like this:

x='echo -e "a\n"'
y='echo b'
z="$x;$y"
eval $x
eval $y
eval $z

prints:

a

b
a

b

Now the newline is preserved and interpreted by the echo, not the eval.

| improve this answer | |
3
0

Not necessarily the optimal way as it will fail if the x and y variables contain sequences processed by printf like %s and similar but anyway, here is a method to do it while keeping \n as a separator:

x='echo a'
y='echo b'
z="$x\n$y"
eval $x
eval $y
export IFS=" "
eval $(printf "$z")

prints:

a
b
a
b
| improve this answer | |
2
0

A slightly different approach:

read -r -d '' script <<'EOF'
echo a
echo b
EOF

eval "$script"

outputs

a
b

Explanation

  • read -r -d '' script
    • -r - do not allow backslashes to escape any characters
    • -d '' - continue until the first character of DELIM is read, rather than newline (makes it read until EOF)
    • script - the name of the variable to save the result in
  • <<'EOF' - use a heredoc WITHOUT variable expansion (the single quotes around the EOF stops the variable expansion)

Alternative

This could also be done using $(cat <<'EOF'...EOF), but this way does not needlessly use cat and does not use a subshell.

Example with useless cat:

script=$(cat <<'EOF'
echo a
echo b
EOF
)

eval "$script"
| improve this answer | |
0
0

On my FreeBSD box, I was trying do something in a Bourne script which at first seemed fairly trivial - but clouded my mind for a few moments. Since this page is what I referred to trying to fix my problem, I will explain what I needed to do and how I got it done :

a=A

b=B

eval ${a}_${b}="something"

No problems so far. I get a new variable A_B that stores "something"

But if I spread the assignment over 2 lines as under :

eval ${a}_${b}="some

thing"

The shell barks back at me that it could find no command called 'thing'. It is important to understand that eval tries to evaluate RHS as a command. To get eval to evaluate RHS as a string, you have to double-double quote RHS :

eval ${a}_${b}="\"some

thing\""

Hope this helps someone. Manish Jain

| improve this answer | |

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