6

Below, I written x64 assembly that prints 'Hello, World!' from a syscall on Mac OS X 10.8. It assembles and runs perfect when executed standalone.

; Assemble and link with:
; nasm -f macho64 -o HelloWorld.o HelloWorld.s
; ld -arch x86_64 -o HelloWorld HelloWorld.o

global start

section .text

start:

    push rbp
    mov rbp, rsp

    jmp short String

    xor rdi, rdi
    mov di, 0x01

StringRet:
    pop rsi

    xor rdx, rdx
    mov dl, 0xE

    mov r8b, 0x02
    shl r8, 24
    or r8, 0x04
    mov rax, r8

    syscall            ; System call for write(4)

    xor edi, edi

    mov r8b, 0x02
    shl r8, 24
    or r8, 0x01
    mov rax, r8

    syscall            ; System call for exit(1)

    mov rsp, rbp
    pop rbp

String:

    call StringRet
    db 'Hello, World!'

The problem I'm having is when I try to run this code as shell code from a c program. I used otool to get the following machine opcodes.

otool -t HelloWorld.o

char code[] = "\x55\x48\x89\xe5\x41\xb0\x02\x49\xc1\xe0\x18\x49\x83\xc8\x04\x4c"
              "\x89\xc0\x48\x31\xff\x66\xbf\x01\x00\xeb\x1e\x5e\x48\x31\xd2\xb2"
              "\x0e\x0f\x05\x41\xb0\x02\x49\xc1\xe0\x18\x49\x83\xc8\x01\x4c\x89"
              "\xc0\x31\xff\x0f\x05\x48\x89\xec\x5d\xe8\xdd\xff\xff\xff\x48\x65"
              "\x6c\x6c\x6f\x2c\x20\x57\x6f\x72\x6c\x64\x21";

And below is the c program I'm using to execute this. But I keep getting a Bus error: 10.

; Compile:
; gcc -o HelloWorldTest HelloWorldTest.c

char code[] = "\x55\x48\x89\xe5\x41\xb0\x02\x49\xc1\xe0\x18\x49\x83\xc8\x04\x4c"
              "\x89\xc0\x48\x31\xff\x66\xbf\x01\x00\xeb\x1e\x5e\x48\x31\xd2\xb2"
              "\x0e\x0f\x05\x41\xb0\x02\x49\xc1\xe0\x18\x49\x83\xc8\x01\x4c\x89"
              "\xc0\x31\xff\x0f\x05\x48\x89\xec\x5d\xe8\xdd\xff\xff\xff\x48\x65"
              "\x6c\x6c\x6f\x2c\x20\x57\x6f\x72\x6c\x64\x21";

int main()
{
    int (*ret)();

    ret = (int(*)())code;

    (int)(*ret)();

    return 0;
}

When I step through with gdb I get KERN_PROTECTION_FAILURE right when execution is passed to the shellcode.

Updated Question:

The above was solved by Carl Norum, it was due to memory protection. I have a different problem but is similar to above. Instead of having the shell code in the same file, I want to read the shell code from a .txt file and execute it. Below I tried marking a section of memory as PROT_EXEC and read the contents of the .txt file into it and execute. But it won't work, I'm getting the same error, KERN_PROTECTION_FAILURE, I tried using mprotect and mmap to mark a section of memory as PROT_EXEC.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/mman.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int (*ret)();

unsigned char* buf;

int main()
{
    FILE* file;
    file = fopen("text.txt", "rb");

    unsigned int len = ftell(file);

    buf = (char*)malloc(len);
    fread(buf, 1, len, file);

    fclose(file);

    mprotect(&buf, len, PROT_EXEC);

   // I also tried mmap, but same error.
   /*void *ptr = mmap(0, 1024, PROT_EXEC, MAP_ANON | MAP_PRIVATE, -1, 0);

    if (ptr == MAP_FAILED)
    {
        perror("mmap");
        exit(-1);
    }

    memcpy(ptr, buf, 1024);*/

    ret = buf;

    ret();

    return 0;
}

This is the text.txt file I'm reading in, its the same hello world code:

\x55\x48\x89\xe5\xeb\x33\x48\x31\xff\x66\xbf\x01\x00\x5e\x48\x31\xd2\xb2\x0e\x41\xb0\x02\x49\xc1\xe0\x18\x49\x83\xc8\x04\x4c\x89\xc0\x0f\x05\x31\xff\x41\xb0\x02\x49\xc1\xe0\x18\x49\x83\xc8\x01\x4c\x89\xc0\x0f\x05\x48\x89\xec\x5d\xe8\xc8\xff\xff\xff\x48\x65\x6c\x6c\x6f\x2c\x20\x57\x6f\x72\x6c\x64\x21\x0a

Since I'm copying the contents of the txt file into PROC_EXEC memory, I don't understand why I'm getting KERN_PROTECTION_FAILURE.

  • Does the new text file contain the characters backslash, x, 5, 5, etc? Or does it contain the characters '\x55' (digit 7 IIRC)? – Jonathan Leffler Jul 24 '13 at 18:29
  • Yes it contains, \x, the .txt file is exactly as shown above. – James Moore Jul 24 '13 at 18:34
  • You don't need to cast the return value of malloc in a C program. – Carl Norum Jul 24 '13 at 18:36
  • A couple of problems. 1. you should use valloc to get page-aligned memory, and 2. you are probably getting 0 back from that ftell call. You need an fseek(SEEK_END) in there. Also 3. you need to convert that ASCII text into actual binary code to be executed. 4. You probably don't want &buf there - just buf would be correct. – Carl Norum Jul 24 '13 at 18:40
  • 1
    See extra question Read and execute shellcode from a text file for answer to the updated portion this question. – Jonathan Leffler Jul 24 '13 at 19:18
10

Your program tries to execute the shellcode from a memory paged marked "execute disable", which is the default for memory in the data section. That's why you see the KERN_PROTECTION_FAILURE. You need to put the shellcode in the text section:

__attribute__((section("__TEXT,__text")))
char code[] = ...

After doing that, your program works fine:

$ clang -Wall -Wextra -pedantic -O2 example.c -o example
$ ./example
Hello, World!

Editorial note: You don't need the typecast on your function pointer invocation. Just ret(); will be fine. You'll need to get rid of at least the (int) part to compile without warnings.

Edit:

Here's a program that works without requiring you to do section-override gymnastics:

#include <sys/mman.h>
#include <inttypes.h>
#include <unistd.h>

char code[] = "\x55\x48\x89\xe5\x41\xb0\x02\x49\xc1\xe0\x18\x49\x83\xc8\x04\x4c"
              "\x89\xc0\x48\x31\xff\x66\xbf\x01\x00\xeb\x1e\x5e\x48\x31\xd2\xb2"
              "\x0e\x0f\x05\x41\xb0\x02\x49\xc1\xe0\x18\x49\x83\xc8\x01\x4c\x89"
              "\xc0\x31\xff\x0f\x05\x48\x89\xec\x5d\xe8\xdd\xff\xff\xff\x48\x65"
              "\x6c\x6c\x6f\x2c\x20\x57\x6f\x72\x6c\x64\x21\x0a";

int main()
{
    int (*ret)() = (int (*)())code;
    void *page = (void *)((uintptr_t)code & ~(getpagesize() - 1));

    mprotect(page, sizeof code, PROT_EXEC);

    ret();

    return 0;
}

Example runs:

$ clang -O2 -Wall -Wextra example.c -o example
$ ./example
Hello, World!
$ gcc -O2 -Wall -Wextra example.c -o example
$ ./example
Hello, World!
  • Thank you, it works with clang as in your example. How would I be able to run this from gcc. When I put "__attribute__((section("__TEXT,__text")))" before char code [], I get an error, "Global variable 'code' section type or attributes does not match previous section specifier". – James Moore Jul 23 '13 at 23:55
  • Why do you want to use gcc when you can use clang? Let me try it out here. – Carl Norum Jul 23 '13 at 23:56
  • No reason, I never used clang before. I just want to see how I would fix this sort of error from gcc. – James Moore Jul 24 '13 at 0:01
  • You have to do the same sort of thing. The GCC that comes with Mac OS X is llvm-gcc, though, which has long been unsupported. Clang is the system compiler for Mac OS X. I tried your program with GCC on a linux machine I have handy and using __attribute__((section(".text"))) worked there. The program crashes because the shellcode is intended for Mac OS X, but at least the section assignment worked. – Carl Norum Jul 24 '13 at 0:02
  • @JamesMoore - answer updated with a clang & GCC compatible version using mprotect. – Carl Norum Jul 24 '13 at 0:12

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