7

This question already has an answer here:

I am trying to do this:

var KEYS = {} ;

KEYS.PHONE_TYPE = 'phone-type';
KEYS.AGENT_TYPE = 'agent-type';

var myAppConfig = {
    ...
    iconMap : { 
        KEYS.PHONE_TYPE : 'icon-phone', 
        KEYS.AGENT_TYPE : 'icon-headphones'
    };
    ...
};

But it is failing, with a message: Expected ':' and instead saw '.'.

How can I initialize an object using indirect (non-literal) keynames?

To be clear, the result I want is:

{
    'phone-type' : 'icon-phone',
    'agent-type' : 'icon-headphones'
}

marked as duplicate by Michał Perłakowski javascript Dec 22 '16 at 22:31

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

7

You would have to add those properties separately using bracket notation:

var myAppConfig = {
    ...
    iconMap : { }
    ...
};

myAppConfig.iconMap[ KEYS.PHONE_TYPE ] = 'icon-phone';
myAppConfig.iconMap[ KEYS.AGENT_TYPE ] = 'icon-headphones';
  • 1
    Thanks. I am still surprised that javascript has no built-in support for initialization of an object with dynamic keynames. Python can do this for dictionaries, and it is very convenient. I guess this comes from the fact that the quotes are optional in javascript properties. – dangonfast Jul 24 '13 at 11:31
  • I guess JS abandoned that possibility by allowing unquoted attribute names, Python avoids this by requiring quoted attribute names. – Petruza Dec 19 '14 at 20:14
7

If you're using ES6 (or something like Babel/browserify), you can write it like this:

iconMap : { 
    [KEYS.PHONE_TYPE] : 'icon-phone', 
    [KEYS.AGENT_TYPE] : 'icon-headphones'
};

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.