2
public class TestMain {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Double value = 1.25 * ((19.6 / 100) + 1);
        System.out.println(value);
        Double value2 = (1.25 * (19.6 / 100)) + (1 * 1.25);
        System.out.println(value2);
    }
}

which result is :

1.4949999999999999
1.495

and I don't understand why these are different...

I added explicitly parenthesis to test different cases, and I don't understand why the Factored form return 1.49499 and the developed form return what i want : 1.495.

2

If you need precise results with floating points you can use BigDecimal class.

BigDecimal factor = new BigDecimal(19.6);
BigDecimal multiplier =  new BigDecimal(1.25);
BigDecimal oneHundred = new BigDecimal(100);
BigDecimal one = new BigDecimal(1);

BigDecimal res = multiplier.multiply(factor.divide(oneHundred).add(one));
System.out.println(res);

BigDecimal res2 = multiplier.multiply(factor.divide(oneHundred)).add(one.multiply(multiplier));
System.out.println(res2);

results in:

1.495000000000000017763568394002504646778106689453125
1.495000000000000017763568394002504646778106689453125
  • 1
    You should use BigDecimal(String) constructor. – Rohit Jain Jul 24 '13 at 11:54
  • @Rohit Jain: could you explain why? Is there any difference between BigDecimal(1) and BigDecimal("1")? – kaos Jul 24 '13 at 13:09
1

Because certain floating point numbers cannot be represented by a finite number of bits without rounding . Floating-point numbers have a limited number of digits, they cannot represent all real numbers accurately: when there are more digits than the format allows, the leftover ones are omitted - the number is rounded.

You should probably read What Every Computer Scientist Should Know About Floating-Point Arithmetic and this answer.

i don't understand why the factored form return 1.49499 and the developped form return what i want : 1.495.

I am not sure of the exact reason , but it seems in the first case the intermittent results itself were rounded.

1

BASIC CONCEPT
1. when we do addition of two decimal number it never extends its decimal point.
2. when we do multiplication of two decimal number it will extends its decimal point as require.

To understand concept Java Code

public static void main(String[] args) {
        Double v1 = (19.6/100);
        System.out.println("inti v1 = "+v1);
        v1 += 1; 
        System.out.println("1 + v1 = "+v1);
        v1 *= 1.25;
        System.out.println("Ans = 1.25 * v1 = "+v1);
        Double v2 = (19.6 / 100);
        Double v3 = (double) 1;
        System.out.println(" inti v2 = "+v2);
        System.out.println("inti v3 = "+v3);
        v2 *= 1.25;
        v3 *= 1.25;
        System.out.println("1.25 * v2 = "+v2);
        System.out.println("1.25 * v3 = "+v3);
        Double v4 = v2+v3;
        System.out.println("Ans v2 + v3 = v4 = "+v4);
    }}

OutPut

 1. inti v1 = 0.196
 2. 1 + v1 = 1.196
 3. Ans = 1.25 * v1 = 1.4949999999999999

 4. inti v2 = 0.196
 5. inti v3 = 1.0
 6. 1.25 * v2 = 0.245
 7. 1.25 * v3 = 1.25
 8. Ans v2 + v3 = v4 = 1.495

Indicated line number in output to get easy understand concept.

This is not different program but one by one process which follow in maths for +/*,in your code.

You can see in output,
Line 3,Line 6,Line 7 there we do multiplication there it extended its decimal point.
and in Line 2 & Line 8 we do addition, as you know addition never extend its decimal point get largest decimal point to display.

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