112

I have a program that does some data analysis and is a few hundred lines long.

Very early on in the program, I want to do some quality control and if there is not enough data, I want the program to terminate and return to the R console. Otherwise, I want the rest of the code to execute.

I've tried break,browser, and quit and none of them stop the execution of the rest of the program (and quit stops the execution as well as completely quitting R, which is not something I want to happen). My last resort is creating an if-else statement as below:

 if(n < 500){}
 else{*insert rest of program here*}

but that seems like bad coding practice. Am I missing something?

4
  • 4
    quit most certainly stops execution of the rest of the program. Please provide a reproducible example. Jul 24, 2013 at 14:42
  • @JakeBurkhead -- is my code above (with an empty if statement) the best way to go, then? @Joshua Ulrich, quit exits all of R, but I want to return to the R console because the program needs to remain open for my purposes. Jul 24, 2013 at 14:45
  • What do you mean by a programme? Do you mean you are running a function you wrote or are you sourcing in a script? Jul 24, 2013 at 14:52
  • if-else is probably the correct way to handle this. Exceptions are for situations that should not happen if everything is used correctly. If it's something that can happen and you know how to handle it, use normal control flow.
    – Matthew
    Jul 27, 2017 at 15:02

9 Answers 9

76

You could use the stopifnot() function if you want the program to produce an error:

foo <- function(x) {
    stopifnot(x > 500)
    # rest of program
}
9
  • +1!I guess The function foo should be called the beginning of the script and contain other validations control...
    – agstudy
    Jul 24, 2013 at 15:05
  • 26
    stopifnot is handy but a crafted response using if(x < 500) { stop("Not enough observations in 'x': n < 500")} might be preferred. Also, if this is something for a batch job, handling the issue without throwing an error is useful. Jul 24, 2013 at 15:13
  • 5
    Stop trying to confuse the OP. What he wants is quit() or stop(), not stopifnot(). Feb 23, 2014 at 21:01
  • 13
    @stackoverflowuser2010 He doesn't want quit (see question!) I don't even think stop of stopifnot is the best way to handle this; stop throws an error, the whole script will just abort. Whilst stopifnot (or stop) seems to be the Answer OP liked best, writing a function to exit cleanly, without error, is more beneficial in a wider range of situations. Having written lots of long-running scripts for large data analysis jobs, nothing is more annoying than functions that throw errors instead of handling the issue and returning cleanly. But clearly I don't know what I'm talking about... Feb 24, 2014 at 4:40
  • Can you please clarify your comment about throwing an error @GavinSimpson? When I try stop("my message") I get printed into the terminal Error: "my message" Execution halted. So this shows an error message output, but are you saying it does not "throw" an error? (ie it will not stop a batch job that has been set to abort if any of the scripts it calls throw errors). Thanks! (Right now I am calling the script with Rscript)
    – rrr
    Jul 30, 2019 at 3:10
20

Perhaps you just want to stop executing a long script at some point. ie. like you want to hard code an exit() in C or Python.

print("this is the last message")
stop()
print("you should not see this")
3
  • 2
    For this code I get the error message Error in eval(expr, envir, enclos) :.
    – jochen
    May 10, 2017 at 9:35
  • 2
    Yes, execution does indeed stop. Coincidentally, if you replace stop() with exit() or please.stop.now(), the script also stops (only the error messages are of course different).
    – jochen
    May 10, 2017 at 13:00
  • 2
    @jochen Adding a quoted phrase inside the stop() command can help distinguish this "error" from other messages. For example: stop("Manual break inserted here") might be more informative than stop() alone.
    – Omar Wasow
    Jan 7, 2020 at 2:19
20

Edited. Thanks to @Droplet, who found a way to make this work without the .Internal(): Here is a way to implement an exit() command in R.

exit <- function() { invokeRestart("abort") }    

print("this is the last message")
exit()
print("you should not see this")

Only lightly tested, but when I run this, I see this is the last message and then the script aborts without any error message.

Below is the uglier version from my original answer.

exit <- function() {
  .Internal(.invokeRestart(list(NULL, NULL), NULL))
}
9
  • 1
    Downside is that it is not allowed for code in a CRAN package. So if you intend to you use in a package which you want to upload to CRAN, it will yield a warning in the R CMD CHECK.
    – MS Berends
    Oct 28, 2017 at 14:30
  • 1
    Yes, this looks more like a system function. It might break if internal details of the interpreter are changed, so may be better a part of the R core rather than in a separate packate? I found this by following different paths through the R source code to see how I could end up at the correct place to exit the interpreter without an error message being emitted. There were not so many ways I found to get there; this is why I use .invokeRestart which then in turn seems to need the .Internal.
    – jochen
    Oct 28, 2017 at 16:16
  • 1
    weird. I just tried this and last output line was [1] "you should not see this" R version 3.4.3 (2017-11-30) Platform: x86_64-pc-linux-gnu (64-bit) Running under: Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server release 6.10 (Santiago) Aug 13, 2018 at 7:25
  • 1
    @aspiringGuru I just tried and it still works for me. Did you run the commands as a script? If you run them one after another in the command line (e.g. using copy and paste), then of course exit() cannot prevent the next command (which hasn't been entered yet) from running ...
    – jochen
    Aug 13, 2018 at 10:03
  • 4
    I got it to work with exit <- function() { invokeRestart("abort") }
    – Droplet
    Jun 6, 2020 at 11:30
15

Reverse your if-else construction:

if(n >= 500) {
  # do stuff
}
# no need for else
1
  • 2
    simple enough and I guess this might be the best I can do, thanks Jul 24, 2013 at 14:51
10

Edit: Seems the OP is running a long script, in that case one only needs to wrap the part of the script after the quality control with

if (n >= 500) {

.... long running code here

}

If breaking out of a function, you'll probably just want return(), either explicitly or implicitly.

For example, an explicit double return

foo <- function(x) {
  if(x < 10) {
    return(NA)
  } else {
    xx <- seq_len(x)
    xx <- cumsum(xx)
  }
  xx ## return(xx) is implied here
}

> foo(5)
[1] 0
> foo(10)
 [1]  1  3  6 10 15 21 28 36 45 55

By return() being implied, I mean that the last line is as if you'd done return(xx), but it is slightly more efficient to leave off the call to return().

Some consider using multiple returns bad style; in long functions, keeping track of where the function exits can become difficult or error prone. Hence an alternative is to have a single return point, but change the return object using the if () else () clause. Such a modification to foo() would be

foo <- function(x) {
  ## out is NA or cumsum(xx) depending on x
  out <- if(x < 10) {
    NA
  } else {
    xx <- seq_len(x)
    cumsum(xx)
  }
  out ## return(out) is implied here
}

> foo(5)
[1] NA
> foo(10)
 [1]  1  3  6 10 15 21 28 36 45 55
9
  • I thought of this as well, but it's not clear that OP's talking about breaking out of a function.
    – Thomas
    Jul 24, 2013 at 14:48
  • Yeah, Thomas is right -- I'm not talking about breaking out of a function. Jul 24, 2013 at 14:49
  • 1
    @user2588829 You'd be much better off putting that as a function in R rather than a 100+ line script. Jul 24, 2013 at 14:54
  • @GavinSimpson oh, I'm still new to R so I didn't know that. If I define it as a 100+ line function is that better practice? Jul 24, 2013 at 15:00
  • 1
    @user2588829 Yes, far better. You control the arguments of the function so can pass in what is needed. Also, instead of sourcing the 100+ lines of code to run the analysis you just do myFun(arg1, arg2, arg3) etc. It is just a much better way of organising things. Jul 24, 2013 at 15:01
7

This is an old question but there is no a clean solution yet. This probably is not answering this specific question, but those looking for answers on 'how to gracefully exit from an R script' will probably land here. It seems that R developers forgot to implement an exit() function. Anyway, the trick I've found is:

continue <- TRUE

tryCatch({
     # You do something here that needs to exit gracefully without error.
     ...

     # We now say bye-bye         
     stop("exit")

}, error = function(e) {
    if (e$message != "exit") {
        # Your error message goes here. E.g.
        stop(e)
    }

    continue <<-FALSE
})

if (continue) {
     # Your code continues here
     ...
}

cat("done.\n")

Basically, you use a flag to indicate the continuation or not of a specified block of code. Then you use the stop() function to pass a customized message to the error handler of a tryCatch() function. If the error handler receives your message to exit gracefully, then it just ignores the error and set the continuation flag to FALSE.

2

Here:

if(n < 500)
{
    # quit()
    # or 
    # stop("this is some message")
}
else
{
    *insert rest of program here*
}

Both quit() and stop(message) will quit your script. If you are sourcing your script from the R command prompt, then quit() will exit from R as well.

5
  • 7
    It's bad practice to post answers that duplicate those already posted.
    – Thomas
    Apr 8, 2014 at 15:15
  • @Thomas which answer does this duplicate? I see only this answer using both stop and quit, and actually explaining the difference between them.
    – user707650
    Oct 15, 2015 at 4:39
  • @Thomas: Explain exactly what answer does my answer duplicate. Oct 15, 2015 at 23:38
  • @Thomas: I posed a question regarding your criticism. I'm waiting for you to please answer it. Jun 29, 2017 at 17:43
  • 5
    @netskink's answer uses stop(), and OP already indicated in comments that they don't want quit() ...
    – Ben Bolker
    Jun 29, 2017 at 22:02
1

I had a similar issue: Exit the current function, but not wanted to finish the rest of the code. Finally I solved it by a for() loop that runs only once. Inside the for loop you can set several differenct conditions to leave the current loop (function).

  for (i in T) {
    print('hello')
    if (leave.condition) next
    print('good bye')
  }
0

You can use the pskill function in the R "tools" package to interrupt the current process and return to the console. Concretely, I have the following function defined in a startup file that I source at the beginning of each script. You can also copy it directly at the start of your code, however. Then insert halt() at any point in your code to stop script execution on the fly. This function works well on GNU/Linux and judging from the R documentation, it should also work on Windows (but I didn't check).

# halt: interrupts the current R process; a short iddle time prevents R from
# outputting further results before the SIGINT (= Ctrl-C) signal is received 
halt <- function(hint = "Process stopped.\n") {
    writeLines(hint)
    require(tools, quietly = TRUE)
    processId <- Sys.getpid() 
    pskill(processId, SIGINT)
    iddleTime <- 1.00
    Sys.sleep(iddleTime)
}
3
  • 1
    >pskill(processId, SIGINT) closes the session and kicks user out of RStudio even. It is quite dangerous but functional....
    – Espanta
    Dec 30, 2015 at 7:36
  • Didn't know it would crash RStudio, but the same issue is discussed in: stackoverflow.com/questions/32820534/… On linux though, my solution works fine. Its advantage over stopifnot is that the stopifnot() Error message does not show up. Dec 31, 2015 at 18:33
  • I checked on Windows and it behaves mad. Thanks anyway. I like the pskill.
    – Espanta
    Jan 1, 2016 at 16:35

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