102

I have a dataframe like this:

   A         B       C
0  1  0.749065    This
1  2  0.301084      is
2  3  0.463468       a
3  4  0.643961  random
4  1  0.866521  string
5  2  0.120737       !

Calling

In [10]: print df.groupby("A")["B"].sum()

will return

A
1    1.615586
2    0.421821
3    0.463468
4    0.643961

Now I would like to do "the same" for column "C". Because that column contains strings, sum() doesn't work (although you might think that it would concatenate the strings). What I would really like to see is a list or set of the strings for each group, i.e.

A
1    {This, string}
2    {is, !}
3    {a}
4    {random}

I have been trying to find ways to do this.

Series.unique() (http://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/generated/pandas.Series.unique.html) doesn't work, although

df.groupby("A")["B"]

is a

pandas.core.groupby.SeriesGroupBy object

so I was hoping any Series method would work. Any ideas?

153
In [4]: df = read_csv(StringIO(data),sep='\s+')

In [5]: df
Out[5]: 
   A         B       C
0  1  0.749065    This
1  2  0.301084      is
2  3  0.463468       a
3  4  0.643961  random
4  1  0.866521  string
5  2  0.120737       !

In [6]: df.dtypes
Out[6]: 
A      int64
B    float64
C     object
dtype: object

When you apply your own function, there is not automatic exclusions of non-numeric columns. This is slower, though, than the application of .sum() to the groupby

In [8]: df.groupby('A').apply(lambda x: x.sum())
Out[8]: 
   A         B           C
A                         
1  2  1.615586  Thisstring
2  4  0.421821         is!
3  3  0.463468           a
4  4  0.643961      random

sum by default concatenates

In [9]: df.groupby('A')['C'].apply(lambda x: x.sum())
Out[9]: 
A
1    Thisstring
2           is!
3             a
4        random
dtype: object

You can do pretty much what you want

In [11]: df.groupby('A')['C'].apply(lambda x: "{%s}" % ', '.join(x))
Out[11]: 
A
1    {This, string}
2           {is, !}
3               {a}
4          {random}
dtype: object

Doing this a whole frame group at a time. Key is to return a Series

def f(x):
     return Series(dict(A = x['A'].sum(), 
                        B = x['B'].sum(), 
                        C = "{%s}" % ', '.join(x['C'])))

In [14]: df.groupby('A').apply(f)
Out[14]: 
   A         B               C
A                             
1  2  1.615586  {This, string}
2  4  0.421821         {is, !}
3  3  0.463468             {a}
4  4  0.643961        {random}
  • 2
    Thanks Jeff! Haven't given it a go yet but would like to understand the logic behind it. You are creating a dictionary of series, and turn that back into a series? Can't get my (admittedly frazzled) brain round what that would even mean... Would you mind to elaborate a bit more? And in A = x['A'].sum(), is the first A an object or as a string? If it is a string, shouldn't it have quotes around? Sorry, as I said, quite frazzled, I hope I am making sense... – Anne Jul 24 '13 at 19:41
  • 4
    each group get's passed a DataFrame (called x), so x['A'] is a Series, just like regular indexing (but its just the rows in that group). the x['A'].sum() thus reduces to a scalar value, as do the other terms. Net you are returning a Series with values for the index=['A','B','C']. These are stacked (row-wise) to form the result frame at the very end of the apply. You can do bare strings for the keys when you use dict, equiv is { 'A' : x['A'].sum() } – Jeff Jul 24 '13 at 19:46
  • 1
    great! just to point out though, you should still do the aggregation on A and B via a direct .sum() rather than apply because these are cythonized. The apply going to be slower, so do only where you really need it. – Jeff Jul 24 '13 at 20:17
  • 4
    Great answer! A slightly more direct way to apply different functions on several columns is to use the agg function, so df.groupby('A').agg(dict(A = 'sum', B = 'sum', C = lambda x: '{%s}'%', '.join(x))) – machow Jul 25 '13 at 17:37
  • 1
    they are the same; apply is a bit more flexible in how it looks at the output (just slightly) – Jeff Jul 25 '13 at 19:26
55

You can use the apply method to apply an arbitrary function to the grouped data. So if you want a set, apply set. If you want a list, apply list.

>>> d
   A       B
0  1    This
1  2      is
2  3       a
3  4  random
4  1  string
5  2       !
>>> d.groupby('A')['B'].apply(list)
A
1    [This, string]
2           [is, !]
3               [a]
4          [random]
dtype: object

If you want something else, just write a function that does what you want and then apply that.

19

You may be able to use the aggregate (or agg) function to concatenate the values. (Untested code)

df.groupby('A')['B'].agg(lambda col: ''.join(col))
  • It really works. Amazing. As @voithos mentioned "untested", I was not very optimistic. Bit I tested his version as an entry in an agg dictionary and it worked as intended: .agg({'tp': 'sum', 'BaseWgt': 'max','TP_short':lambda col: ', '.join(col)}) Made my day – matthhias Jul 6 '18 at 16:36
6

a simple solution would be :

>>> df.groupby(['A','B']).c.unique().reset_index()
  • this should be the right answer. gets you answer cleanly. thanks a lot! – imsrgadich Jul 27 '18 at 12:49
  • If in case someone is interested in joining the contents of the list into a string df.groupby(['A','B']).c.unique().apply(lambda x: ';'.join(x)).reset_index() – Vivek-Ananth Aug 29 '18 at 14:56
6

You could try this:

df.groupby('A').agg({'B':'sum','C':'-'.join})
  • 2
    From review: could you please add more explanation to your answer? – toti08 Oct 15 '18 at 12:41
  • 1
    Groupby is applied on column 'A' and with agg function i could use different functions on different columns say sum the elements in column 'C' , concatenate the elements in column 'C' while inserting a ' - ' between the words – user3241146 Oct 16 '18 at 7:11
5

If you'd like to overwrite column B in the dataframe, this should work:

    df = df.groupby('A',as_index=False).agg(lambda x:'\n'.join(x))

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