26

I'm looking to call the Rows.Scan() function using reflection. However it takes a variable number of pointers, but I'm new to Golang and there are not a lot of source examples. I need to use reflection because I plan on filling a slice with the values from a Query call. So basically using rows.Columns() to get the length of the row and then make() a slice of []interface{} to fill with the data points that would normally be filled using the pointers passed to the Scan() function.

Basically something like this code:

col := rows.Columns()
vals := make([]interface{}, len(cols))
rows.Scan(&vals)

Anyone have an example of calling a variadic function that takes pointers using reflection that I can take a look at?

Edit: Sample code that doesn't appear to do what I'm after.

package main

import (
    _ "github.com/lib/pq"
    "database/sql"
    "fmt"
)


func main() {

    db, _ := sql.Open(
        "postgres",
        "user=postgres dbname=Go_Testing password=ssap sslmode=disable")

    rows, _ := db.Query("SELECT * FROM _users;")

    cols, _ := rows.Columns()

    for rows.Next() {

        data := make([]interface{}, len(cols))

        rows.Scan(data...)

        fmt.Println(data)
    }

}

The results:

[<nil> <nil> <nil> <nil> <nil>]
[<nil> <nil> <nil> <nil> <nil>]
[<nil> <nil> <nil> <nil> <nil>]
[<nil> <nil> <nil> <nil> <nil>]
[<nil> <nil> <nil> <nil> <nil>]
[<nil> <nil> <nil> <nil> <nil>]
46

Here's the solution that I've arrived at. It doesn't get the Types before traversing the data, and so doesn't know before hand the type of each value before pulling the values out through Scan(), but the point really is to not have to know the types before hand.

The trick was to create 2 slices, one for the values, and one that holds pointers in parallel to the values slice. Then once the pointers are used to fill data, the values array is actually filled with the data, which can then be used to populate other data structures.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    _ "github.com/lib/pq"
    "database/sql"
)

func main() {

    db, _ := sql.Open(
        "postgres",
        "user=postgres dbname=go_testing password=pass sslmode=disable")

    rows, _ := db.Query("SELECT * FROM _user;")

    columns, _ := rows.Columns()
    count := len(columns)
    values := make([]interface{}, count)
    valuePtrs := make([]interface{}, count)

    for rows.Next() {

        for i, _ := range columns {
            valuePtrs[i] = &values[i]
        }

        rows.Scan(valuePtrs...)

        for i, col := range columns {

            var v interface{}

            val := values[i]

            b, ok := val.([]byte)

            if (ok) {
                v = string(b)
            } else {
                v = val
            }

            fmt.Println(col, v)
        }
    }
}
  • Creating a command line terminal for querying databases in the cloud. This worked nicely as a starting point... Thanks! – openwonk Apr 27 '15 at 22:26
  • Anyone tried this in go 1.4.2 or higher?. I'm getting all the fields in string type – Anuruddha Dec 23 '15 at 10:28
  • Just what I needed, I love this community – Mauricio Jul 8 '17 at 22:29
5

To lucidquiet: you can also assign a interface instead of making a slice

The following code works good:

var sql = "select * from table"
rows, err := db.Query(sql)
columns, err = rows.Columns()
colNum := len(columns)

var values = make([]interface{}, colNum)
for i, _ := range values {
    var ii interface{}
    values[i] = &ii
}

for rows.Next() {
    err := rows.Scan(values...)
    for i, colName := range columns {
        var raw_value = *(values[i].(*interface{}))
        var raw_type = reflect.TypeOf(raw_value)

        fmt.Println(colName,raw_type,raw_value)
    }
}
4

I don't think you need reflection for this - you can use a slice and the ... operator to pass multiple values to a variadic function.

col := rows.Columns()
vals := make([]interface{}, col)
rows.Scan(vals...)

I may be misunderstanding what you want to do though!

  • Well, that seems like it would work. I've updated my question with example code. Using the ... operator with this code produces and invalid memory address or nil pointer dereference. I feel like I need to initialize the data array with pointers or something... – lucidquiet Jul 25 '13 at 13:38
  • Scratch that, the memory address issue was with my sql and not the operator usages. I can compile and run the code with the fix now, but I get no data, every entry into the data (or in your example vals), is nil. So, ultimately this didn't quite work as I'd like. – lucidquiet Jul 25 '13 at 14:22
  • 4
    -1: Rows.Columns() returns ([]string, error); further, Scan() fails if you don't pass in pointers (and it will complain that []interface{} is not an array of pointers unless you initialize its values to be pointers to interfaces a la the accepted answer). – weberc2 May 6 '14 at 16:22
1

The following solution allows you to refer to the field by field name instead of index. It's more like PHP style:

Table definition:

CREATE TABLE `salesOrder` (
  `idOrder` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `uid` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `changed` datetime NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`idOrder`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=3 DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

main.go:

package main

import (
        "database/sql"
        "encoding/json"
        "fmt"
        _ "github.com/go-sql-driver/mysql"
        "log"
        "reflect"
        "strings"
)

var (
        db *sql.DB
)

func initDB() {
        var err error

        // The database/sql package manages the connection pooling automatically for you.
        // sql.Open(..) returns a handle which represents a connection pool, not a single connection.
        // The database/sql package automatically opens a new connection if all connections in the pool are busy.
        // Reference: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/17376207/how-to-share-mysql-connection-between-http-goroutines
        db, err = sql.Open("mysql", "MyUser:MyPassword@tcp(localhost:3306)/MyDB")
        //db, err = sql.Open("mysql", "MyUser:MyPassword@tcp(localhost:3306)/MyDB?tx_isolation='READ-COMMITTED'") // optional

        if err != nil {
                log.Fatalf("Error on initializing database connection: %v", err.Error())
        }

        // Open doesn't open a connection. Validate DSN data:
        err = db.Ping()

        if err != nil {
                log.Fatalf("Error on opening database connection: %v", err.Error())
        }
}

func StrutToSliceOfFieldAddress(s interface{}) []interface{} {
        fieldArr := reflect.ValueOf(s).Elem()

        fieldAddrArr := make([]interface{}, fieldArr.NumField())

        for i := 0; i < fieldArr.NumField(); i++ {
                f := fieldArr.Field(i)
                fieldAddrArr[i] = f.Addr().Interface()
        }

        return fieldAddrArr
}

func testSelectMultipleRowsV3(optArr map[string]interface{}) {
        // queries
        query := []string{}
        param := []interface{}{}

        if val, ok := optArr["idOrder"]; ok {
                query = append(query, "salesOrder.idOrder >= ?")
                param = append(param, val)
        }

        // The first character of the field name must be in upper case. Otherwise, you would get:
        // panic: reflect.Value.Interface: cannot return value obtained from unexported field or method
        var sqlField = struct {
                IdOrder int
                Uid     int
                Changed string
        }{}

        var rowArr []interface{}

        sqlFieldArrPtr := StrutToSliceOfFieldAddress(&sqlField)

        sql := "SELECT "
        sql += "  salesOrder.idOrder "
        sql += ", salesOrder.uid "
        sql += ", salesOrder.changed "
        sql += "FROM salesOrder "
        sql += "WHERE " + strings.Join(query, " AND ") + " "
        sql += "ORDER BY salesOrder.idOrder "

        stmt, err := db.Prepare(sql)
        if err != nil {
                log.Printf("Error: %v", err)
        }
        defer stmt.Close()

        rows, err := stmt.Query(param...)

        if err != nil {
                log.Printf("Error: %v", err)
        }

        defer rows.Close()

        if err != nil {
                log.Printf("Error: %v", err)
        }

        //sqlFields, err := rows.Columns()

        for rows.Next() {
                err := rows.Scan(sqlFieldArrPtr...)

                if err != nil {
                        log.Printf("Error: %v", err)
                }

                // Show the type of each struct field
                f1 := reflect.TypeOf(sqlField.IdOrder)
                f2 := reflect.TypeOf(sqlField.Uid)
                f3 := reflect.TypeOf(sqlField.Changed)
                fmt.Printf("Type: %v\t%v\t%v\n", f1, f2, f3)

                // Show the value of each field
                fmt.Printf("Row: %v\t%v\t%v\n\n", sqlField.IdOrder, sqlField.Uid, sqlField.Changed)

                rowArr = append(rowArr, sqlField)
        }

        if err := rows.Err(); err != nil {
                log.Printf("Error: %v", err)
        }

        // produces neatly indented output
        if data, err := json.MarshalIndent(rowArr, "", " "); err != nil {
                log.Fatalf("JSON marshaling failed: %s", err)
        } else {
                fmt.Printf("json.MarshalIndent:\n%s\n\n", data)
        }
}

func main() {
        initDB()
        defer db.Close()

        // this example shows how to dynamically assign a list of field name to the rows.Scan() function.
        optArr := map[string]interface{}{}
        optArr["idOrder"] = 1
        testSelectMultipleRowsV3(optArr)
}

Sample output:

# go run main.go

Type: int       int     string
Row: 1  1       2016-05-06 20:41:06

Type: int       int     string
Row: 2  2       2016-05-06 20:41:35

json.MarshalIndent:
[
 {
  "IdOrder": 1,
  "Uid": 1,
  "Changed": "2016-05-06 20:41:06"
 },
 {
  "IdOrder": 2,
  "Uid": 2,
  "Changed": "2016-05-06 20:41:35"
 }
]
  • I'm not sure if this did reply the OP question, but I have to say that you have saved me hours of time searching on the Web on how to retrieve row data from a SQL database and JSONify it... it's so easy in Go, but you have to know how! So, thank you very much! :) – Gwyneth Llewelyn May 14 '17 at 18:38

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