22

Assume I have a set of unique_ptr:

std::unordered_set <std::unique_ptr <MyClass>> my_set;

I'm not sure what's the safe way to check if a given pointer exists in the set. The normal way to do it may be to call my_set.find (), but what do I pass as a parameter?

All I have from the outside is a raw pointer. So I have to create another unique_ptr from the pointer, pass it to find() and then release() that pointer, otherwise the object would get destructed (twice). Of course, this process can be done in a function, so the caller can pass the raw pointer and I do the conversions.

Is this method safe? Is there a better way to work with a set of unique_ptr?

  • Thanks. I don't need to move or copy anything, so unique_ptr is okay. I just need to let the caller give me a raw pointer, and I need to check if a matching unique_ptr exists in the set. – cfa45ca55111016ee9269f0a52e771 Jul 25 '13 at 7:11
  • 1
    unique_ptr is obviously not what you need, since you clearly have other pointers to the object. – James Kanze Jul 25 '13 at 8:43
  • 2
    The owner of the unique_ptr is the only owner of the memory, and all others just hold references. I could use shared::ptr in the owner and weak_ptr everywhere else, but then each object is referenced by a single shared_ptr. I don't need the sharing, just a single owner – cfa45ca55111016ee9269f0a52e771 Jul 25 '13 at 8:45
  • 5
    @JamesKanze I don't see why a std::unique_ptr has to be the only pointer to some object. The "unique" doesn't stand for unique address, but unique ownership. A std::shared_ptr that doesn't own its pointee is a far worse correctness crime. – Christian Rau Jul 25 '13 at 8:47
  • 2
    Not a duplicate. The linked question asks for set, this one for unordered_set and this is a large difference. – IllidanS4 Mar 3 '18 at 11:10
22

You can also use a deleter that optionally doesn't do anything.

template<class T>
struct maybe_deleter{
  bool _delete;
  explicit maybe_deleter(bool doit = true) : _delete(doit){}

  void operator()(T* p) const{
    if(_delete) delete p;
  }
};

template<class T>
using set_unique_ptr = std::unique_ptr<T, maybe_deleter<T>>;

template<class T>
set_unique_ptr<T> make_find_ptr(T* raw){
    return set_unique_ptr<T>(raw, maybe_deleter<T>(false));
}

// ...

int* raw = new int(42);
std::unordered_set<set_unique_ptr<int>> myset;
myset.insert(set_unique_ptr<int>(raw));

auto it = myset.find(make_find_ptr(raw));

Live example.

11

Note that the ability to do heterogenous lookups on standard containers is subject of some proposals.

http://cplusplus.github.io/LWG/lwg-proposal-status.html lists

  • N3465 Adding heterogeneous comparison lookup to associative containers for TR2 (Rev 2) [Handle with N3573]
  • N2882 id.
  • N3573 Heterogenous extensions to unordered containers [Handle with N3465]

Especially the latter looks like it would cover your use case.

For now, here is an IMO not very pretty but working alternative workaround (O(n)):

#include <iterator>
#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>

#include <unordered_set>
#include <memory>

#include <cassert>

struct MyClass {};

template <typename T>
struct RawEqualTo
{
    RawEqualTo(T const* raw) : raw(raw) {}

    bool operator()(T const* p) const  
        { return raw == p; }
    bool operator()(std::unique_ptr<T> const& up) const  
        { return raw == up.get(); }

  private:
    T const* raw;
};


using namespace std;
int main()
{
    std::unordered_set <std::unique_ptr <MyClass>> my_set;

    my_set.insert(std::unique_ptr<MyClass>(new MyClass));
    my_set.insert(std::unique_ptr<MyClass>(new MyClass));

    auto raw = my_set.begin()->get();

    bool found = end(my_set) != std::find_if(begin(my_set), end(my_set), RawEqualTo<MyClass>(raw));
    assert(found);

    raw = new MyClass;

    found = end(my_set) != std::find_if(begin(my_set), end(my_set), RawEqualTo<MyClass>(raw));
    assert(!found);

    delete raw;
}

Warning It's also very inefficient, of course.

  • +1 For mentioning heterogeneous lookups (and at least a warning that std::find_if drives the use of a std::unordered_set ad absurdum). – Christian Rau Jul 25 '13 at 8:27
  • Heterogenous extensions solve the problem, they do exactly what I need :-) But the solution you propose here is indeed too inefficient. I need the O(1) average of unordered_set::find – cfa45ca55111016ee9269f0a52e771 Jul 25 '13 at 8:33
  • @Nawaz Because a std::shared_ptr would be absolutely misplaced if the memory just isn't shared. – Christian Rau Jul 25 '13 at 8:40
  • 1
    @ChristianRau But it obviously is shared, since there are clearly pointers to the objects outside the container. – James Kanze Jul 25 '13 at 8:44
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    @fr33domlover find shouldn't throw (unless the hash function or the comparison function throws). But having two unique_ptr to the same object sounds like a recipe for disaster, and a maintenance nightmare, since it violates the invariants of unique_ptr. – James Kanze Jul 25 '13 at 8:48
8

You can use a std::map<MyClass*, std::unique_ptr<MyClass>> instead of a set. Then you can add elements like this:

 std::unique_ptr<MyClass> instance(new MyClass);
 map.emplace(instance.get(), std::move(instance));
  • 3
    -1. What is wrong with std::set? In this case, std::map is bad. Key and value are same object essentially! – Nawaz Jul 25 '13 at 7:07
  • 1
    @Nawaz the unique_ptr holds the memory while the raw pointer is used for find() and all other methods which search-by-key. – cfa45ca55111016ee9269f0a52e771 Jul 25 '13 at 7:10
  • 2
    @Nawaz Well, so how would you solve the "need to find a unique_ptr when I have only raw-pointer" problem? This answer solves it by introducing an explicit mapping. Note that std::[unrodered_]set is what the OP's currently got, and is asking how to do the search. – Angew Jul 25 '13 at 7:14
  • 1
    @Nawaz std::unordered_set::find is O(1); std::find_if is O(n). That can make a difference very quickly. – James Kanze Jul 25 '13 at 8:51
  • 1
    @petersohn Using the release() method is unsafe if you ever have to modify the code, or maintain it in any fashion. Regardless of exceptions. You're lying to the compiler and to anyone reading the code. – James Kanze Jul 25 '13 at 8:53
5

If the goal is constant time for the look up, I don't think that there is a solution. std::unordered_set<std::unique_ptr<MyClass>>::find requires an std::unique_ptr<MyClass> as argument. You will have to either change the container, or change the contained type.

One possibility might be to replace std::unique_ptr with std::shared_ptr, and change the rest of the code so that all MyClass are put into a shared_ptr as soon as they are created, and are only manipulated through shared pointers. Logically, this is probably more coherent anyway: unique_ptr pretty much implies (by its name, as well as its semantics) that there aren't other pointers to the object. On the other hand, you may not be able to use shared_ptr, if e.g. MyClass has pointers to other MyClass, which may build a cycle.

Otherwise, if you can accept O(lg n) access, rather than constant access (the difference generally doesn't become noticeable until the tables are fairly large), you can use an std::vector<MyClass>, using std::lower_bound to keep it sorted. Unlike std::unordered_set<>::find, std::lower_bound does not require the target value to have the same type as the value_type of the sequence; all you have to do is to ensure that they are comparable, say by providing a Compare object along the lines of:

class MyClassPtrCompare
{
    std::less<MyClass const*> cmp;
public:
    bool operator()( std::unique_ptr<MyClass> const& lhs,
                     std::unique_ptr<MyClass> const& rhs ) const
    {
        return cmp( lhs.get(), rhs.get() );
    }
    bool operator()( MyClass const* lhs,
                     std::unique_ptr<MyClass> const& rhs ) const
    {
        return cmp( lhs, rhs.get() );
    }
    bool operator()( std::unique_ptr<MyClass> const& lhs,
                     MyClass const* rhs ) const
    {
        return cmp( lhs.get(), rhs );
    }
    bool operator()( MyClass const* lhs,
                     MyClass const* rhs ) const
    {
        return cmp( lhs, rhs );
    }
};

Insertion may involve a number of moves, but moving a std::unique_ptr should be fairly cheap, and the improved locality of this solution might offset the additional runtime costs it otherwise imposes.

  • +1 Seems like a good compromise. Strange none of the find_if advocators cosidered this at all (but Ok, didn't think of this myself either). – Christian Rau Jul 25 '13 at 8:46
  • Good idea. Currently I don't mind O(lg n) but I plan to support large numbers of objects and lots of queries, so I prefer to use an average O(1) approach if possible – cfa45ca55111016ee9269f0a52e771 Jul 25 '13 at 8:47
  • 2
    @fr33domlover Yet you might be surprised how well that sorted vector will behave in practice, I guess. – Christian Rau Jul 25 '13 at 8:49
  • Good alternative solution using std::vector. It also uses *less memory* than std::set. It reminds me of this article: Why you shouldn't use set (and what you should use instead) – Nawaz Jul 25 '13 at 8:52
  • 3
    @fr33domlover From experience: you might find that the O(lg n) of the sorted vector outperforms the O(1) of the unordered_set, because of much better locality. – James Kanze Jul 25 '13 at 8:55

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