2

I am unable to see the effects of AggressiveInlining when I simply wrap a DataStructure call

For example:

public class WList
{
   //made static just to check inlining
   //otherwise inlining might not kick in since 'this' keyword will disallow it
   static System.Collections.ArrayList list;

   [MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.AggressiveInlining)]
   public override void Put(object item)
   {
       WList.list.Add(item);
   }
}

And then do this

    //Add 1000000 number of items in the list
    //Run this test many times 
    for (int j = 0; j < 100; j++)
    {
        Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
        sw.Start();

        for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
        {
            //ADD ITEMS IN A SIMPLE ARRAY LIST
            arraylist.Add(emptyobject);
        }

        sw.Stop();
        //clear the list
    }

    //Do similar test on wrapper
    for (int j = 0; j < 100; j++)
    {
        Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
        sw.Start();

        for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
        {
            //ADD ITEMS IN ARRAY LIST THROUGH WRAPPER
            wrapperList.Put(emptyobject);
        }

        sw.Stop();
        //clear the list
    }

Inlinig is basically supposed to unwrap the function and place the inside code outside, but the numbers I am getting of the wrappers are slower than the direct calls.

The numbers remain the same if Hastable is used or a get call is used instead of the add.

The performance cost of a function call remains there.

2 Answers 2

7

A stopwatch is not the correct tool to assess whether code is being inlined. It simply provides a performance metric.

Firstly, to have code inlined you must perform a build with optimizations enabled. The easiest way to do this with Visual Studio is with a release build. A debug build will not be optimized by the JITter and therefore nothing will get inlined. To see whether code has been inlined by the JITter I suggest you attach the debugger and compare the disassembly between a debug build and a release build. If a call is inlined then you will notice a difference.

In your example, the call assembly instruction corresponding to WList.Put() would disappear in the release build and be replaced by the call assembly instruction corresponding to ArrayList.Add().

It's worth mentioning that by default when you attach the Visual Studio debugger to any build it will suppress optimizations to allow you to correctly step through each line of the code. To turn this off you need to uncheck the "Suppress JIT optimization on module load" option found in Tools -> Options -> Debugging -> General.

Secondly, to answer your actual question. The method will not get inlined because it is virtual. Please refer to the blog post below.

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/davidnotario/archive/2004/11/01/250398.aspx

"These are some of the reasons for which we won't inline a method:

  • Virtual calls: We don't inline across virtual calls. The reason for not doing this is that we don't know the final target of the call. We could potentially do better here (for example, if 99% of calls end up in the same target, you can generate code that does a check on the method table of the object the virtual call is going to execute on, if it's not the 99% case, you do a call, else you just execute the inlined code), but unlike the J language, most of the calls in the primary languages we support, are not virtual, so we're not forced to be so aggressive about optimizing this case."

Whilst this post is nearly 10 years old I don't believe this has changed with any later JIT compilers.

2
  • Excellent, thorough answer
    – Basic
    Commented Jul 15, 2015 at 16:25
  • Provided link no longer works
    – Arugin
    Commented Mar 2 at 17:23
2

Because your method is virtual the JIT compiler will not inline virtual calls, read this forum for more information. Also to make sure that methods was inlined you can:

Check System.Reflection.MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod().Name. If the method is inlined, it will return the name of the caller instead.

1
  • Your answer was correct as well but the other answer was more in detail with great links. I hope you understand :) Commented Jul 30, 2013 at 7:45

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.