9

I have some data that has to be formatted as (%d/%m/%Y). The data is out of chronological order because it is sorted by the first number which is the day, not the month.

I'm hoping I can specify to order or reorder that I want the sorting to happen differently. I'm just not sure how to do this.

Here is some date data to be ordered:

date
1/1/2009  
1/1/2010
1/1/2011
5/4/2009
5/4/2011
10/2/2009
10/3/2011
15/9/2010
15/3/2009
31/12/2011
31/7/2009

Thanks for any suggestions.

1
  • Do you also want to preserve that date-string in its native format e.g. for labeling ticks on plots? i.e. preserve as a separate column
    – smci
    May 7, 2016 at 4:18

3 Answers 3

11

When order by column date convert it Date format.

df[order(as.Date(df$date,format="%d/%m/%Y")),,drop=FALSE]
         date
1    1/1/2009
6   10/2/2009
9   15/3/2009
4    5/4/2009
11  31/7/2009
2    1/1/2010
8   15/9/2010
3    1/1/2011
7   10/3/2011
5    5/4/2011
10 31/12/2011
1
  • Thanks! It makes me wonder how many times I have to tell R something is a date, but I guess the answer is "every time".
    – Nazer
    Jul 25, 2013 at 18:26
10

This is easier with a little help from plyr and lubridate:

library(lubridate)
library(plyr)

df <- read.csv(text = "date
1/1/2009  
1/1/2010
1/1/2011
5/4/2009
5/4/2011
10/2/2009
10/3/2011
15/9/2010
15/3/2009
31/12/2011
31/7/2009", stringsAsFactors = FALSE)

# Convert variable to date    
df$date <- dmy(df$date)
arrange(df, date)
# Or for descending order
arrange(df, desc(date))
5
  • 1
    I beg to differ on the easier you claim here as the accepted solutions wins by not requiring add-on packages and also solves the issue in a single statement. Jul 26, 2013 at 13:39
  • 4
    You're welcome to play code golf if you want. I think my solution is a nice alternative because you don't need to know about how date format strings work, or why you need drop = FALSE
    – hadley
    Jul 26, 2013 at 13:40
  • 1
    You're welcome to reinvent R into 'H' by replacing / redefining every single aspect to what R does. Lots of windmills left in Spain for you to yell at, Don Quixote :) Jul 26, 2013 at 13:58
  • 2
    Thanks, @hadley. I struggle with using dates in R all the time, so I'll definitely looking into lubridate.
    – Nazer
    Jul 30, 2013 at 19:20
  • I'm gonna say @hadley for the win. At least for me, it's easier to import as a date and use a function with syntax that's pretty close to NL versus having to cast as a date inside the function. The accepted answer isn't bad, of course, but for a newbie, it's hard to parse. Isn't the whole function of packages, reinventing R, to make the coding more streamlined?
    – maxo
    Feb 26, 2021 at 21:10
0

Ugly but seems to work:

date[order(sapply(strsplit(date, "/"), 
                  function(x) { paste(x[3], sprintf("%02d", as.integer(x[1])), 
                                            sprintf("%02d", as.integer(x[2])), 
                                            sep="") 
                              }
                 )
          )
    ]
1
  • Would you mind adding some comments and indentation to your code so we can read it better (and avoid horizontal scrolling)? Jul 25, 2013 at 18:01

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