3

I have the following piece of HTML:

<html>
    <head>
        <style>
            .part { background-color: blue; width: 40%; float: right; }
        </style>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div>
            <div class="part">Hello World 1 </div>
            <div class="part">Hello World 2</div>
            <div class="part">Hello World 3</div>
            <div class="part">Hello World 4</div>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>

Right now the text is flowing to the right (good) and down (bad). Is it possible to flow to the right and up?

The current version looks like:

[Hello World 1][Hello World 2]
[Hello World 3][Hello World 4]

The final version should look like:

[Hello World 3][Hello World 4]
[Hello World 1][Hello World 2]
  • My guess is, without updating your mark up, No. But I'm willing to be proven wrong. – Liam Jul 26 '13 at 14:22
  • 1
    That's not what it gives me... jsfiddle.net/wcbK9 – Zach Saucier Jul 26 '13 at 14:24
  • 1
    If you change your mark up you can just switch 1 & 2 and 3 & 4 jsfiddle.net/wcbK9/1 – Zach Saucier Jul 26 '13 at 14:29
  • 1
    @Zeaklous I can't do that because the tabs are dynamically generated and I don't know ahead of time how many there will be or how wide they will be (i.e. I don't know if I will have multiple lines of tabs or not, nor will I know how many tabs will be on each line) – Jin Kim Jul 26 '13 at 14:37
  • 2
    Easy: rotate outer div 180deg; rotate inner divs 180deg. Problem solved. Simples. (see my answer for more detail ;-)) – Spudley Jul 26 '13 at 15:09
7

One slightly cheeky way to do this would be to rotate both the outer div and the inner divs by 180 degrees.

Rotating the outer div will mean the elements are upside-down but shown in the order you want them.

Rotating the inner divs will put them back the right way up while keeping them in the reverse order.

The whole code is as simple as this:

.outer, .part {
    transform:rotate(180deg);
}

Yes, it's a very very cheeky hack. It's certainly not efficient in terms of processing power. And it just feels wrong. But you know... it works.

Here it is in action in a fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/zW4TR/

(note: you may need vendor prefixes on the transform style for some browsers, and also note that it won't work in IE8 or earlier as it doesn't support transforms. (there is a way of rotating in IE8, but it it's pretty ugly and quirky, and I would worry about how well they'd work with rotations inside rotations)

  • this is both awful and amazing at the same time, at the moment I'm considering running out of the office screaming in both joy and despair at the same time...Love/hate it :) – Liam Jul 26 '13 at 15:28
  • @Liam -- that pretty much sums up my own reaction to it too.... "Always remember, kids: just because you can do something doesn't mean you should." :-) – Spudley Jul 26 '13 at 15:34
  • Amazing it works! This is the outside the box thinking I needed. Thank you! – Jin Kim Jul 26 '13 at 16:03
3

You can do this without modifying your markup, but support is extremely limited due to the fact that only 3 browsers support wrapping in Flexbox: Opera, Chrome, IE10.

CODEPEN

Just added a class here for simplicity:

<div class="container">
    <div class="part">Hello World 1 </div>
    <div class="part">Hello World 2</div>
    <div class="part">Hello World 3</div>
    <div class="part">Hello World 4</div>
</div>

CSS:

.container {
  display: -ms-flexbox;
  display: -webkit-flex;
  -webkit-flex-wrap: wrap-reverse;
  -ms-flex-wrap: wrap-reverse;
  flex-wrap: wrap-reverse;
}
@supports (flex-wrap: wrap) {
  .container {
    display: flex;
  }
}

.part {
  -webkit-flex: 1 50%;
  -ms-flex: 1 50%;
  flex: 1 50%;
}
  • Firefox and others have partial (generally almost full) support caniuse.com/flexbox – Zach Saucier Jul 26 '13 at 14:38
  • Current support: caniuse.com/flexbox – kapa Jul 26 '13 at 14:39
  • 3
    No, Firefox doesn't support wrapping (see how it is marked as partial support? Read the notes for what it refers to). IE10 is the only browser that's marked as having partial support that supports wrapping. – cimmanon Jul 26 '13 at 14:40
  • Would someone care to explain the downvotes? The OP does not specify browser requirements and the solution works fluidly without adjusting the markup or relying on absolute positioning. – cimmanon Jul 29 '13 at 18:42
1

Here's a solution I worked up. It's a bit of a messy solution - it uses absolute positioning ,:nth element, pixel-based margins, and an !important tag to override inline styles.

However, there's no need to change the HTML markup at all. This can all be achieved through a linked stylesheet.

Here's the CSS:

div {
  position: relative;
  width: 50%;
  float: right;
}

.part {
  width: inherit !important;
}

.part:nth-child(1),
.part:nth-child(2) {
  float: left;
  margin-top: 20px;
}

.part:nth-child(3),
.part:nth-child(4){
  position: absolute;
  float: left;
}

.part:nth-child(4) {
  right: 0;
}
0

I tried your code on my own, and it seems that it's working correctly. Element 1 and 2 are on the upper side (tested on chrome and firefox).

However, here are some possible solutions:

The easiest way would be to change the order of the elements:

<div>
     <div class="part">Hello World 3</div>
     <div class="part">Hello World 4</div>
     <div class="part">Hello World 1 </div>
     <div class="part">Hello World 2</div>
</div>

But I guess that's not what you are looking for.

Another solution would be to put the divs inside another parent-div:

<div>
     <div class="part">Hello World 1 </div>
     <div class="part">Hello World 2</div>
</div>
<div>
     <div class="part">Hello World 3</div>
     <div class="part">Hello World 4</div>
</div>

If you aren't able to change the HTML-Code, there might be some special CSS3-selectors wich might fit, but I cant test it, because it's already working for me.

  • I think Jin Kim does not want to change the HTML markup. – Hieu Le Jul 26 '13 at 14:35

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