107

I have images looking like <img ng-src="dynamically inserted url"/>. When a single image is loaded, I need to apply iScroll refresh() method so that to make image scrollable.

What is the best way to know when an image is fully loaded to run some callback?

1

6 Answers 6

188

Here is an example how to call image onload http://jsfiddle.net/2CsfZ/2/

Basic idea is create a directive and add it as attribute to img tag.

JS:

app.directive('imageonload', function() {
    return {
        restrict: 'A',
        link: function(scope, element, attrs) {
            element.bind('load', function() {
                alert('image is loaded');
            });
            element.bind('error', function(){
                alert('image could not be loaded');
            });
        }
    };
});

HTML:

 <img ng-src="{{src}}" imageonload />
2
  • 1
    what about a failure callback? Commented Apr 20, 2014 at 1:16
  • 3
    What about progressive image? Commented Jan 15, 2017 at 10:37
151

I modified this a little so that custom $scope methods can be called:

<img ng-src="{{src}}" imageonload="doThis()" />

The directive:

.directive('imageonload', function() {
        return {
            restrict: 'A',
            link: function(scope, element, attrs) {
                element.bind('load', function() {
                    //call the function that was passed
                    scope.$apply(attrs.imageonload);
                });
            }
        };
    })

Hope someone finds it VERY useful. Thanks @mikach

The doThis() function would then be a $scope method

4
  • 3
    That's correct. Mikach's solution didn't work for me until I used $apply() as you did. Commented Jan 20, 2015 at 9:03
  • This is the best of the answers provided. Totally eliminates the need for any JQUERY loading as well.
    – Noel Baron
    Commented Dec 9, 2016 at 18:12
  • Thank you for putting semi-colons so lint wouldn't explode.
    – richard
    Commented Jan 26, 2018 at 19:51
  • this gives me this error: code.angularjs.org/1.4.9/docs/error/$rootScope/… Commented Apr 16, 2020 at 18:44
9

@ Oleg Tikhonov: Just updated the previous code.. @ mikach Thanks..)

app.directive('imageonload', function() {
  return {
    restrict: 'A',
    link: function(scope, element, attrs) {
        element.bind('load', function() {
            alert('image is loaded');
        });
        element.bind('error', function(){
             alert('image could not be loaded');
        });
    }
  };
});
1
  • 1
    Might be better to have that in an 'imageonerror' directive so you can perform a different action. Commented Oct 30, 2015 at 13:58
5

My answer:

 var img = new Image();
 var imgUrl = "path_to_image.jpg";
 img.src = imgUrl;
 img.onload = function () {
      $scope.pic = img.src;
 }
0
4

Just updated the previous code..

<img ng-src="{{urlImg}}" imageonload="myOnLoadImagenFunction">

and directive...

    .directive('imageonload', function() {
        return {
            restrict: 'A',
            link: function(scope, element, attrs) {
                element.bind('load', function() {
                    scope.$apply(attrs.imageonload)(true);
                });
                element.bind('error', function(){
                  scope.$apply(attrs.imageonload)(false);
                });
            }
        };
    })
0

Basically this is the solution I ended up using.

$apply() should only be used by external sources in the right circumstances.

rather then using apply, I've thrown the scope updating to end of the call stack. Works as good as "scope.$apply(attrs.imageonload)(true);".

window.app.directive("onImageload", ["$timeout", function($timeout) {

    function timeOut(value, scope) {
        $timeout(function() {
            scope.imageLoaded = value;
        });
    }

    return {
        restrict: 'A',
        link: function(scope, element, attrs) {
            element.bind('load', function() {
                timeOut(true, scope);
            }).bind('error', function() {
                timeOut(false, scope);
            });
        }
    };

}]);
2
  • what you mean by "$apply() should only be used by external sources"? i'm not following. Commented Sep 14, 2016 at 13:25
  • @genuinefafa What he means by 'external sources' is non-Angular code. So for instance if you're using a generic JS event listener to call into code that changes $scope, you would need to use $apply there. But if it's an Angular event or a $scope function you don't need $apply because the $digest cycle is already running from Angular methods.
    – tpartee
    Commented Aug 10, 2017 at 17:57

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