1

IMPORTANT : THE EXAMPLE IS WRONG, I EXPLAIN WHY AT THE BOTTOM

As the title stated the question is about to define a way to determine when the current executing method is invoked in a recursively way.

I have think about having a "query method" that return a boolean indicating if the invoker method (this is, the method that invokes the "query method") has been already invoked before.

How to check that : just peeking at the stack trace and see if the method we want to check figures two or more times in the stack trace.

Having explaining that, here is the implementation of a method and the respective use of it.

This is not correct...

public class Test
{
    public static boolean isRecusivelyInvoqued () {
        StackTraceElement[] traces = Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace();
        boolean res = false;
        // the first belong to "getStackTrace" and the second to "isRecusivelyInvoqued" (this method)
        if (traces.length > 2) { 
            String invokedMethodName = traces[2].getMethodName(); // the third is the method we want to check
            for (int i = 3; i < traces.length && !res; i++)
            {
                res = invokedMethodName.equals(traces[i].getMethodName());
                i++;
            }
        }
        return res;
    }

    // this is a recursive method, used to verify the correct functioning
    public static int factorial (int n) {
        System.out.println(isRecusivelyInvoqued());
        if (n == 0) {
            return 1;
        }
        else {
            return n * factorial(n-1);
        }
    }


    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        System.out.println(factorial(4));
    }

}

I realize if a method in differents namespaces (Class or instance) has the same name, it will return that is invoquedRecursively. I thing that one solution we got this far is that is correct ;) jeje.

This is working for me... is there a better way to archive my goal? How to determine when the current executing method is invoked recursively?

5
  • 4
    And what is your end goal? Why do you want to know if a method is invoked recursively?
    – JB Nizet
    Jul 26, 2013 at 16:28
  • Agreed; knowing the reason you want to know may also help inform the answer, too. Seems like if the answer is right for this one then it was invoked recursively, no? Jul 26, 2013 at 16:30
  • Yes guys! i tell you right away... my end goal is to implement my personal object repository (like a DAO). When a i persist an entity, i want to persists too only those direct associated entities.. e.g. : those fields that contains references to other entity/ies object/s. So in the "create" method, i check if this method is invoked for the first "time".. in this cases i trigger the hidden method for persisting or merging the associated fields... i thing is quite complicated and there are several ways to archive this... i am currently thinking on one approach.. just for learning purposes.
    – Victor
    Jul 26, 2013 at 16:37
  • 1
    @Victor Why can't you just iterate over the properties? Jul 26, 2013 at 16:44
  • Because i thought about having an abstract base class with generic type that have a lot of code that every concrete dao or repository (subclasses) uses. So i implement a template method where the subclasses has the opportunity to save their associations. mmmmm... that leads me to others questions.. i just don´t thought about that approach.. maybe is a good one! My idea is to make code public.. but still is not well documented, but i will most happy to share with anybody that could show me another ways.
    – Victor
    Jul 26, 2013 at 16:49

4 Answers 4

3

How about this: Your method passes a boolean to the next invocation of the recursive method that tells it that it has been invoked recursively:

public static int factorial (int n) {
    return privateFactorial(n, false);
}

private static int privatefactorial(int n, boolean calledRecursively) {
    System.out.println(calledRecursively);
    if (n == 0) {
        return 1;
    }
    else {
        return n * privateFactorial(n-1, true);  // tell next invocation here!
    }
}
2
  • Yeah i though about that.. having instead of a boolean, an integer counting the deep invocation recursion. Incrementing by one, in each subsequently call. Good approach.. but have to add an extra method for each method i want to check.
    – Victor
    Jul 26, 2013 at 16:33
  • Sure, I added another method, but this way the caller doesn't have to pass in (or know about) the extra boolean.
    – rgettman
    Jul 26, 2013 at 16:35
2

Another option is to add a "is_recursively_invoked" parameter to your recursive function:

public static int factorial (int n, boolean isInvokedRecursively) {
    System.out.println(isInvokedRecursively);
    if (n == 0) {
        return 1;
    }
    else {
        return n * factorial(n-1, true); // these function calls are recursive
    }
}

and in your main:

System.out.println(factorial(4, false));  // this function call isn't recursive
2
  • It needs a better name for than isInvoked such as perhaps, previouslyInvoked but this is a lot cleaner than the OP's solution. EDIT: Your new name is better than the one I proposed! Jul 26, 2013 at 16:31
  • Thanks @jh314, as i sayd to rgettman. I thing on that using an integer for counting the deep. This approach forces us to create an extra method for those method that i want to check.
    – Victor
    Jul 26, 2013 at 16:35
1

If your only goal is to determine if a given method calls itself, then introspect the byte code using any byte code analysis framework and see if there's a call to the method inside the method body.

If you need data about recursion depth then I would use AspectJ (or equivalent) to instrument the method with around advice that can increment a counter. This also eliminates the need for the method itself to do additional work to support your requirement.

That said, I don't understand the need for the requirement; if the method produces the correct answer, and it relies on recursion, then it's using recursion.

1
  • Thanks @Dave! i will have this in mind. I liked your suggestion of iterate over the properties.. make me thing a lot.
    – Victor
    Jul 26, 2013 at 16:54
1

You can achieve this using an static boolean variable
Here is a sample:

private static boolean isRecursiveCall = false;
private static int factorial (int n) {
    if (n == 0) {
        return 1;
    }
    else {
        isRecursiveCall = true; 
        return n * factorial(n-1);
    }
}
public static int findFactorial(int n){
     isRecursiveCall = false;
     factorial(n);
}
public static void main(String[] args){
      findFactorial(2);
}
6
  • and next call? for example im client , factorial(2) --> true, then factorial(0) --> true , and is false.. don't work.
    – nachokk
    Jul 26, 2013 at 16:43
  • Thanks!, is another approach. I don´t know how to mark all the answer as correct... i guest i will mark, by the end of the day, the first one. But i am very grateful for all the collaboration!
    – Victor
    Jul 26, 2013 at 16:44
  • @Victor Only one answer can be marked accepted. You may choose any of the answers that you believe is correct and that helps you the most.
    – rgettman
    Jul 26, 2013 at 16:47
  • 1
    edited code to work for multiple calls also.please look into it and correct me if there any mistakes Jul 26, 2013 at 16:51
  • factorial shouldn't be public then
    – nachokk
    Jul 26, 2013 at 17:03

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.