217

I am trying to download a client's data to my local machine (programatically) and their webserver is very, very slow which is causing a timeout in my WebClient object.

Here is my code:

WebClient webClient = new WebClient();

webClient.Encoding = Encoding.UTF8;
webClient.DownloadFile(downloadUrl, downloadFile);

Is there a way to set an infinite timeout on this object? Or if not can anyone help me with an example on an alternate way to do this?

The URL works fine in a browser - it just takes about 3 minutes to show.

367

You can extend the timeout: inherit the original WebClient class and override the webrequest getter to set your own timeout, like in the following example.

MyWebClient was a private class in my case:

private class MyWebClient : WebClient
{
    protected override WebRequest GetWebRequest(Uri uri)
    {
        WebRequest w = base.GetWebRequest(uri);
        w.Timeout = 20 * 60 * 1000;
        return w;
    }
}
24

The first solution did not work for me but here is some code that did work for me.

    private class WebClient : System.Net.WebClient
    {
        public int Timeout { get; set; }

        protected override WebRequest GetWebRequest(Uri uri)
        {
            WebRequest lWebRequest = base.GetWebRequest(uri);
            lWebRequest.Timeout = Timeout;
            ((HttpWebRequest)lWebRequest).ReadWriteTimeout = Timeout;
            return lWebRequest;
        }
    }

    private string GetRequest(string aURL)
    {
        using (var lWebClient = new WebClient())
        {
            lWebClient.Timeout = 600 * 60 * 1000;
            return lWebClient.DownloadString(aURL);
        }
    }
20

You need to use HttpWebRequest rather than WebClient as you can't set the timeout on WebClient without extending it (even though it uses the HttpWebRequest). Using the HttpWebRequest instead will allow you to set the timeout.

  • This is not true... you can see above that you can still use WebClient, albeit a custom implementation that overrides the WebRequest to set timeout. – DomenicDatti Aug 6 '14 at 13:21
  • 7
    "System.Net.HttpWebRequest.HttpWebRequest()' is obsolete: 'This API supports the .NET Framework infrastructure and is not intended to be used directly from your code" – usefulBee Dec 3 '14 at 20:24
  • 3
    @usefulBee - because you shouldn't call that constructor: "Do not use the HttpWebRequest constructor. Use the WebRequest.Create method to initialize new HttpWebRequest objects." from msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…. Also see stackoverflow.com/questions/400565/… – ToolmakerSteve Sep 8 '15 at 13:13
  • Just to clarify: While this specific constructor should be avoided (it's no more part of newer .NET versions anyway), it is perfectly fine to use the Timeout property of HttpWebRequest. It's in milliseconds. – Marcel Dec 10 '18 at 9:50
10

Couldn't get the w.Timeout code to work when pulled out the network cable, it just wasn't timing out, moved to using HttpWebRequest and does the job now.

HttpWebRequest request = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create(downloadUrl);
request.Timeout = 10000;
request.ReadWriteTimeout = 10000;
var wresp = (HttpWebResponse)request.GetResponse();

using (Stream file = File.OpenWrite(downloadFile))
{
    wresp.GetResponseStream().CopyTo(file);
}
  • 1
    This answer works great, but for anyone interested, if you use var wresp = await request.GetResponseAsync(); instead of var wresp = (HttpWebResponse)request.GetResponse(); you will get a massive timeout again – andrewjboyd Feb 22 '18 at 6:00
  • andrewjboyd: do you know why GetResponseAsync() does not work? – osexpert Jun 7 at 12:35
9

For completeness, here's kisp's solution ported to VB (can't add code to a comment)

Namespace Utils

''' <summary>
''' Subclass of WebClient to provide access to the timeout property
''' </summary>
Public Class WebClient
    Inherits System.Net.WebClient

    Private _TimeoutMS As Integer = 0

    Public Sub New()
        MyBase.New()
    End Sub
    Public Sub New(ByVal TimeoutMS As Integer)
        MyBase.New()
        _TimeoutMS = TimeoutMS
    End Sub
    ''' <summary>
    ''' Set the web call timeout in Milliseconds
    ''' </summary>
    ''' <value></value>
    Public WriteOnly Property setTimeout() As Integer
        Set(ByVal value As Integer)
            _TimeoutMS = value
        End Set
    End Property


    Protected Overrides Function GetWebRequest(ByVal address As System.Uri) As System.Net.WebRequest
        Dim w As System.Net.WebRequest = MyBase.GetWebRequest(address)
        If _TimeoutMS <> 0 Then
            w.Timeout = _TimeoutMS
        End If
        Return w
    End Function

End Class

End Namespace
7

As Sohnee says, using System.Net.HttpWebRequest and set the Timeout property instead of using System.Net.WebClient.

You can't however set an infinite timeout value (it's not supported and attempting to do so will throw an ArgumentOutOfRangeException).

I'd recommend first performing a HEAD HTTP request and examining the Content-Length header value returned to determine the number of bytes in the file you're downloading and then setting the timeout value accordingly for subsequent GET request or simply specifying a very long timeout value that you would never expect to exceed.

7
'CORRECTED VERSION OF LAST FUNCTION IN VISUAL BASIC BY GLENNG

Protected Overrides Function GetWebRequest(ByVal address As System.Uri) As System.Net.WebRequest
            Dim w As System.Net.WebRequest = MyBase.GetWebRequest(address)
            If _TimeoutMS <> 0 Then
                w.Timeout = _TimeoutMS
            End If
            Return w  '<<< NOTICE: MyBase.GetWebRequest(address) DOES NOT WORK >>>
        End Function
3

Usage:

using (var client = new TimeoutWebClient(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10)))
{
    return await client.DownloadStringTaskAsync(url);
}

Class:

using System;
using System.Net;

namespace Utilities
{
    public class TimeoutWebClient : WebClient
    {
        public TimeSpan Timeout { get; set; }

        public TimeoutWebClient(TimeSpan timeout)
        {
            Timeout = timeout;
        }

        protected override WebRequest GetWebRequest(Uri uri)
        {
            var request = base.GetWebRequest(uri);
            if (request == null)
            {
                return null;
            }

            var timeoutInMilliseconds = (int) Timeout.TotalMilliseconds;

            request.Timeout = timeoutInMilliseconds;
            if (request is HttpWebRequest httpWebRequest)
            {
                httpWebRequest.ReadWriteTimeout = timeoutInMilliseconds;
            }

            return request;
        }
    }
}
  • Didnt work, the async method still works indefinitely – Alex Sep 9 at 19:21
  • Perhaps the problem is different and you need to use ConfigureAwait (false)? – Konstantin S. Sep 10 at 20:05
2

For anyone who needs a WebClient with a timeout that works for async/task methods, the suggested solutions won't work. Here's what does work:

public class WebClientWithTimeout : WebClient
{
    //10 secs default
    public int Timeout { get; set; } = 10000;

    //for sync requests
    protected override WebRequest GetWebRequest(Uri uri)
    {
        var w = base.GetWebRequest(uri);
        w.Timeout = Timeout; //10 seconds timeout
        return w;
    }

    //the above will not work for async requests :(
    //let's create a workaround by hiding the method
    //and creating our own version of DownloadStringTaskAsync
    public new async Task<string> DownloadStringTaskAsync(Uri address)
    {
        var t = base.DownloadStringTaskAsync(address);
        if(await Task.WhenAny(t, Task.Delay(Timeout)) != t) //time out!
        {
            CancelAsync();
        }
        return await t;
    }
}

I blogged about the full workaround here

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