44

Is it possible to pass a function pointer as an argument to a function in C?

If so, how would I declare and define a function which takes a function pointer as an argument?

1
  • 1
    I suggest looking at the world-famous C faqs
    – lorenzog
    Nov 24 '09 at 12:39
79

Definitely.

void f(void (*a)()) {
    a();
}

void test() {
    printf("hello world\n");
}

int main() {
     f(&test);
     return 0;
}
5
  • 7
    Both will work. The ampersand is optional. So is dereferencing the pointer when you're calling the function pointer.
    – mmx
    Nov 24 '09 at 13:05
  • 2
    True, there's no need to change anything. Moreover, even the "pointer" syntax in parameter declaration is optional. The above f could've been declared as void f(void a()).
    – AnT
    Nov 24 '09 at 14:57
  • 5
    Using a typedef for the function pointer type could make the code eaiser to read. Nov 24 '09 at 20:15
  • Is there a way to have a pointer to a function with pre defined value of one of the inputs? Let's say we have void f( float * data, float funParam). Can we have a pointer to the function with a certain value of funParam?
    – Royi
    Sep 5 '18 at 22:19
  • @Royi no. See also stackoverflow.com/questions/4393716/… Mar 9 '19 at 7:23
31

Let say you have function

int func(int a, float b);

So pointer to it will be

int (*func_pointer)(int, float);

So than you could use it like this

  func_pointer = func;
  (*func_pointer)(1, 1.0);

  /*below also works*/
  func_pointer(1, 1.0);

To avoid specifying full pointer type every time you need it you coud typedef it

typedef int (*FUNC_PTR)(int, float);

and than use like any other type

void executor(FUNC_PTR func)
{ 
   func(1, 1.0);
}

int silly_func(int a, float b)
{ 
  //do some stuff
}

main()
{
  FUNC_PTR ptr;
  ptr = silly_func;
  executor(ptr); 
  /* this should also wotk */
  executor(silly_func)
}

I suggest looking at the world-famous C faqs.

14

This is a good example :

int sum(int a, int b)
{
   return a + b;
}

int mul(int a, int b)
{
   return a * b;
}

int div(int a, int b)
{
   return a / b;
}

int mathOp(int (*OpType)(int, int), int a, int b)
{
   return OpType(a, b);
}

int main()
{

   printf("%i,%i", mathOp(sum, 10, 12), mathOp(div, 10, 2));
   return 0;
}
The output is : '22, 5'
0
3

As said by other answers, you can do it as in

void qsort(void *base, size_t nmemb, size_t size,
           int (*compar)(const void *, const void *));

However, there is one special case for declaring an argument of function pointer type: if an argument has the function type, it will be converted to a pointer to the function type, just like arrays are converted to pointers in parameter lists, so the former can also be written as

void qsort(void *base, size_t nmemb, size_t size,
           int compar(const void *, const void *));

Naturally this applies to only parameters, as outside a parameter list int compar(const void *, const void *); would declare a function.

1
  • +1 for the very undermentioned readability-improving trick of taking advantage of implicit pointer conversion.
    – mtraceur
    Sep 30 '20 at 20:27
2

Check qsort()

void qsort(void *base, size_t nmemb, size_t size,
           int (*compar)(const void *, const void *));

The last argument to the function is a function pointer. When you call qsort() in a program of yours, the execution "goes into the library" and "steps back into your own code" through the use of that pointer.

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