43

So I have 2 div's they're in each other so like this

<div class="parent">
    <div class="child"></div>
</div>

and I want to change the background from .parent when I hover over .parent.

but I want the background to turn normal again when I hover over .child.

so for example: (or http://jsfiddle.net/k3Zdt/1/ )

.parent {
    transition:background-color 1s;
    width:100px;
    height:100px;
    background:#3D6AA2;
    padding:50px;
}

.parent:hover {
    background:#FFF;
}

.child {
    height:100px;
    width:100px;
    background:#355E95;
    transition:background-color 1s;
}

.child:hover {
    background:#000;
}
<div class="parent">
    <div class="child">
    </div>
</div>

When I hover over the darkblue area I want the not-so-darkblue area to stay not-so-darkblue instead of changing to white.

I would like to keep this <div> structure. and I dont want a JavaScript solution (I know the JavaScript solution but I want to keep it pure CSS).

9
  • keep the divs side by side and use positioning to look them as parent-child elements.
    – Mr_Green
    Jul 29, 2013 at 12:25
  • 2
    Don't believe you can with CSS and keep the same HTML structure... hovering on a child will always trigger the hover of the parent. You would have to use a different structure or fake it in another way. With the example it isn't a problem, but I assume it is a problem for a more complex setup.
    – robooneus
    Jul 29, 2013 at 12:26
  • "I would like to keep this <div> structure" I don't want to do weird positioning with CSS. tbh. Jul 29, 2013 at 12:27
  • @robooneus I thought it also wouldn't but maybe there is something I don't know of, yet. Jul 29, 2013 at 12:28
  • Here is the Fiddle.
    – Mr_Green
    Jul 29, 2013 at 12:28

2 Answers 2

24

Basically you can't : How to style the parent element when hovering a child element?

But a trick is to use a sibling element : http://jsfiddle.net/k3Zdt/8/

.parent {
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  padding: 50px;
}

.child {
  height: 100px;
  width: 100px;
  background: #355E95;
  transition: background-color 1s;
  position: relative;
  top: -200px;
}

.child:hover {
  background: #000;
}

.sibling {
  position: relative;
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  padding: 50px;
  top: -50px;
  left: -50px;
  background: #3D6AA2;
  transition: background-color 1s;    
}

.sibling:hover {
  background: #FFF;
}
<div class="parent">
    <div class="sibling"></div>
    <div class="child"></div>
</div>

1
13

You can trick something ;)

Basically, use a :before pseudo-element for the child div, with its same size;

when you hover on the child div, enlarge the :before pseudo-element to cover the father div area; this will cause the father div hover effect to fall down, and then to come back to the original state. A precise combination of z-index is involved too.

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/gFu8h/ Dark Magic(tm)

.parent {
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    padding: 50px;
    transition: background-color 1s;
    background: #3D6AA2;    
    position: relative;
    z-index: 1;
}

.parent:hover{
    background: #FFF;    
}

.child {
    height: 100px;
    width: 100px;
    background: #355E95;
    transition: background-color 1s;
    position: relative;
}

.child:hover {    
    background: #000;
}

.child:before{
    content: '';
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    right: 0;
    left: 0;        
    z-index: -1;
    transition: background-color 1s;
}

.child:hover:before{
    top: -50px;
    bottom: -50px;
    left: -50px;
    right: -50px;     
    background: #3D6AA2;    
}
<div class="parent">
    <div class="child"></div>
</div>

2
  • 1
    +1 cool.. didn't thought about it. :)
    – Mr_Green
    Jul 29, 2013 at 13:29
  • 2
    Thanks; this is only a proof-of-concept, it should be adjusted to be more dynamic and to handle the hover-out more properly, if needed (it restores the state only when going out of the father too (that is not the father anymore, because it is the transparent :before enlarged)), but at least... it is possible with pure CSS :) Jul 29, 2013 at 13:34

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