I know there is a term for this, but it escapes me at the moment. Basically, i have something like this:

private static final Map<String, String> myMap = new HashMap<Integer, String>();
    static {
        myMap.put("one", "one text");
        myMap.put("two", "two text");
    }

instead of accessing the map with the standard

myMap.get("one");

is there any way I can use reflection or something else so i can access the string like this

myMap.one;

I know its possible in other languages, not sure if anyone figured out how to do with in java yet. The way the current system is designed, interfaces are really impractical and would end up being even more of a mess than what im dealing with right now. Its not a big deal, but it would simplify synchronizing keys across multiple classes and systems.

thanks

  • I don't think that is possible in Java. But what is wrong with string being used as keys? – bas Jul 29 '13 at 18:25
  • 50 developers with different styles and over 6,000 constants and counting. I'm the first architect to look at the code in almost a year and I'm doing the best I can to make it easier to maintain and use. I have a few options in my bag of tricks, but if someone had come up with a reflection library that would make this possible, it would certainly make it easier. – scphantm Jul 29 '13 at 18:32
up vote 6 down vote accepted

No. Java is a statically typed language, and Map doesn't have a one member... so this would fail to compile.

Use constants for the keys - perhaps enums, even - to avoid the risk of typos, and just use the normal Map methods. Java doesn't provide you any alternatives at a language level.

  • Though a wrapper around a map with exposed public keys is possible and entirely stupid. Check it asm.ow2.org – nullpotent Jul 29 '13 at 18:33
  • Thanks for the answers all, you all said what I figured you would say but no harm in asking. yea, this is the technique i typically use, but the sheer volume of entries is just daunting. I would have done it very differently, but my way back machine is busted so I will make due. – scphantm Jul 29 '13 at 19:50
  • 3
    Incidentally, if you do use enums as map keys, java.util.EnumMap gets you improved functionality and performance. – Taymon Jul 29 '13 at 20:12

No, this is not possible with plain java. Reason is, java is fully typed checked at compile time, so any type/member information must be available. Since your data is runtime informatione, the compiler cannot deduce them and would not compile.

If the keys are fixed and known to program time you could use a enum:

MyEnum.one

is then possible. eg:

MyEnum.one.getValue()

where value() is a abstract method and can be overriten by the enum-constants.

If you don't want to use conventional Strings as keys, maybe it is best to use the following Map

private static Map<Integer, String> mymap = new HashMap<>();

And with the following interface

public static void set(Integer key, String value)
{
    mymap.put(key, value);
}

public static String get(Integer key)
{
    mymap.get(key);
}

I doubt this is really what you're looking for, but just in case. I don't think it will work in Java 1.6 or earlier.

package test;

import java.io.PrintWriter;
import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

import javax.script.ScriptEngine;
import javax.script.ScriptEngineManager;
import javax.script.ScriptException;

import sun.org.mozilla.javascript.internal.Context;

public class HashMapStuff {

    private static final Map<String, String> myMap = new HashMap<String, String>();
    static {
        myMap.put("one", "one text");
        myMap.put("two", "two text");
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ScriptEngineManager manager = new ScriptEngineManager();
        ScriptEngine engine = manager.getEngineByName("js");
        Context.enter().getWrapFactory().setJavaPrimitiveWrap(false);
        engine.put("myMap", myMap);
        PrintWriter writer = new PrintWriter(System.out);
        engine.getContext().setWriter(writer);
        try {
            engine.eval("function MyMapWrapperClass() {};MyMapWrapperClass.prototype.__noSuchMethod__ = function(arg){ return (myMap.get(arg)) };myMapWrapper = new MyMapWrapperClass();");
        } catch (ScriptException e1) {
            e1.printStackTrace();
        }
        try {
            engine.eval("mappedValue = myMapWrapper.one();");
        } catch (ScriptException e1) {
            e1.printStackTrace();
        }
        System.out.println(engine.get("mappedValue"));
        try {
            engine.eval("mappedValue = myMapWrapper.two();");
        } catch (ScriptException e1) {
            e1.printStackTrace();
        }
        System.out.println(engine.get("mappedValue"));
    }

}

Output:

one text
two text

It's not "pure java", but you can do what you're trying to do with Groovy, which does run on the JVM.

  • 1
    Yea, i use groovy with gradle all the time, thats why i thought maybe someone figured out how to do it with java. trust me, if i had the ability to pick a language, this big SOB would be scala in a heartbeat. good 2/3 of the code would just wither away and die. – scphantm Jul 30 '13 at 20:57

You could do something like this. It would get rather unwieldy with lots of map entries, but might work with a limited number.

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

public class MethodMap {

    private static final Map<String, String> internalMap;

    static {
        internalMap = new HashMap<String, String>();
        internalMap.put("one", "one text");
        internalMap.put("two", "two text");
    }

    public static String one = internalMap.get("one");

    public static String two = internalMap.get("two");

}

Edited to add: Thinking about the problem some more, you could write a Java application to read a Map<String, String> and generate this class as output. With a method map code generator, this structure would be practical for a larger number of map rows.

I show how to do this in my Java article Writing Java Code that Writes Java Code.

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