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I want this function to use for loops to iterate through my two vectors (of structs), adding the balance of each object in the innermost struct to a variable "bank balance".

I am unsure of how to loop through this system properly to achieve this. I have a problem with my syntax I think, where I'm trying to call the vector within the struct.

typedef struct account
{
string transactionLog;
float balance;
string *pOwner;
int accountNumber;
string label;
};

typedef account* pAccount;

typedef struct user
{
string testUsername;
string customerName;
string testPassword;
bool isCustomer;
bool isTeller;
bool isManager;
user(string username, string testpassword, string customerName, bool iscustomer,        bool isteller, bool ismanager)
        : testUsername(username), testPassword(testpassword), customerName(customerName), isCustomer(iscustomer),
    isTeller(isteller), isManager(ismanager) {}
typedef vector<pAccount> Accounts;
};

typedef user* pUser;
typedef vector<pUser> userVector;
userVector users;
int vectorPos;

double checkBankBalance()
{
double bankBalance;
for (auto &item : users)
{
    for (auto &item : users[item].Accounts)
    {
         bankBalance = bankBalance + item->balance;
    }
}

return 0;
}

I really have no idea how to format that second for loop. Any tips would be greatly appreciated, I've tried every combination of things I can think of, and everything I've seen on the web.

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  • 1
    Why store pointers in your vectors? You just threw RAII out the window... – Borgleader Jul 30 '13 at 3:56
1

In c++, no need for typedef when declaring a struct. Within struct, declare the Account after typedef. Typedef doesn't declare.

struct user
{
    string testUsername;
    string customerName;
    string testPassword;
    bool isCustomer;
    bool isTeller;
    bool isManager;
    user(string username, string testpassword, string customerName, bool iscustomer,        bool isteller, bool ismanager)
        : testUsername(username), testPassword(testpassword), customerName(customerName), isCustomer(iscustomer),
    isTeller(isteller), isManager(ismanager) {}
    typedef vector<pAccount> Accounts;
    Accounts accounts;
};

Within the loop, change Account (object type) to account (object itself). There is also no need for referencing the item, since it's already pointer type. (You are only copying the address anyways).

In the inner loop, directly access user, since the range for gives you direct access to the object at index.

for (auto user : users)
{
    for (auto account : user.accounts)
    {
         bankBalance = bankBalance + account->balance;
    }
}
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1

Your struct does not contain a vector, it just has a typedef:

typedef vector<pAccount> Accounts;

If you want Accounts to be a data member, remove the typedef.

vector<pAccount> Accounts;

Furthermore, you should seriously consider not using the same name for the items in both levels of the nested loop:

for (auto& user : users)
{
    for (auto& account : user.Accounts)
    {

Also, note that you do not need to use typedef to declare a struct. In typedef struct Foo {};, the typedef is ignored. It just adds clutter to the code.

Finally, at a glance there seems to be no reason for the usage of pointers in your code. It would be greatly simplified if you stored values instead.

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double checkBankBalance()
{
double bankBalance;
for (auto &item : users)
{
    for (auto &item : users[item].Accounts)
    {
         bankBalance = bankBalance + item->balance;
    }
}

return 0;
}
  1. You didn't initialize "bankBalance",
  2. You didn't return (or use) bankBalance,
  3. When you add a member variable, "bankBalance" to your structs, it won't be visible inside this function.
  4. You've not mastered type declaration vs member declaration in C++.

"typedef" defines a type. So you don't need it infront of "struct" or "class" and you definitely don't want it when declaring variables.

For your own sanity, consider making member variable names distinct from other variables, and class/struct names distinct. A common practice is to use "m_" as a prefix for "member", upper-camel-case for classes, "s_" for statics, "g_" for globals.

struct Account /* Capitalize struct/class names */
{
    string m_transactionLog;
    float m_balance;
    string *m_pOwner; // I've got a bad feeling about this.
    int m_accountNumber;
    string m_label;
};

The solution is going to occur to you as you implement the following:

typedef struct User /* capitalize class names */
{
    string m_testUsername;
    //...

    user(const string& username, const string& password, const string& customerName, bool isCustomer, bool isTelelr, bool isManager)
        : m_testUsername(username), m_testPassword(password)
        , m_customerName(customerName /* ouch, this was broken before*/)
        , isCustomer(isCustomer)
        , isTeller(isTeller)
        , isManager(isManager)
    {}
    ...
    // Look ma: a type definition
    //typedef vector<pAccount> Accounts;
    // Well, ma, we actually wanted a member, not a type.
    vector<pAccount> m_accounts; // Ok, pointers to accounts, I have a bad feeling again.
};

Now checkBankBalance becomes fairly intuitive.

double checkBankBalance()
{
    double bankBalance = 0; // local and farm bought.

    for (auto &user: g_users) // everything in users.
    {
        // now we want to iterate over the accounts member of the user.
        // which will be 'm_accounts'. Since it's a pointer, don't use &
        for (auto item : user.m_accounts)
        {
             bankBalance = bankBalance + item->balance;
        }
    }

    /// do something with bankBalance here
    /// ...
    ///

    return 0;
}
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  • Thank you all for your responses, I made your suggested changes and it works beautifully. I will upvote as soon as I meet the requirements. – Wenzel745 Jul 31 '13 at 4:13

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