I have table :

id | name    
1  | a,b,c    
2  | b

i want output like this :

id | name    
1  | a    
1  | b    
1  | c    
2  | b
  • 1
  • 5
    it's generally considered bad practice to store multiple values in the same database column. This best practice - normalisation - generally makes your database work better in future. It is explained here (or read up on 'normalisation') : stackoverflow.com/questions/2331838/… – Graham Griffiths Jul 30 '13 at 9:08
  • @GrahamGriffiths: I would agree with you, at least this is what academic knowledge tells. However, in my company there are lots of instances where they do this kind of stuff (storing multiple values in a delimited string fashion) in a single column, and their claim is that it is more efficient (join-free, and the processing required is not costly). I honestly do not know which point should be preferred. – Veverke Jan 11 '17 at 9:08
up vote 79 down vote accepted

If you can create a numbers table, that contains numbers from 1 to the maximum fields to split, you could use a solution like this:

select
  tablename.id,
  SUBSTRING_INDEX(SUBSTRING_INDEX(tablename.name, ',', numbers.n), ',', -1) name
from
  numbers inner join tablename
  on CHAR_LENGTH(tablename.name)
     -CHAR_LENGTH(REPLACE(tablename.name, ',', ''))>=numbers.n-1
order by
  id, n

Please see fiddle here.

If you cannot create a table, then a solution can be this:

select
  tablename.id,
  SUBSTRING_INDEX(SUBSTRING_INDEX(tablename.name, ',', numbers.n), ',', -1) name
from
  (select 1 n union all
   select 2 union all select 3 union all
   select 4 union all select 5) numbers INNER JOIN tablename
  on CHAR_LENGTH(tablename.name)
     -CHAR_LENGTH(REPLACE(tablename.name, ',', ''))>=numbers.n-1
order by
  id, n

an example fiddle is here.

  • thanks,using 2 table ? i want just 1 table – AFD Jul 30 '13 at 9:26
  • 11
    @user2577038 you could do it without a numbers table, see it here sqlfiddle.com/#!2/a213e4/1 – fthiella Jul 30 '13 at 9:33
  • An important thing to note is in the second example, the maximum number of "fields" separated by comma is 5. You can check the # of occurrences in a string via a method like the one here: stackoverflow.com/questions/12344795/…. Keep adding 'select [number] union all' clauses to the 'numbers' inline view until the number of rows returned stops increasing. – Bret Weinraub Jul 27 '16 at 21:04
  • 1
    As usual I keep stumbling into your useful code. If anyone wants the quick way to create a table similar to the top chunk shown here, here is a link using this routine here. That op was for a single string not a table of them. – Drew Sep 26 '16 at 7:40
  • How would a SQLite version of this look like? I get the following error: could not prepare statement (1 no such function: SUBSTRING_INDEX) – Remi Sture Nov 22 '16 at 8:29

I have take the reference from here with changed column name.

DELIMITER $$

CREATE FUNCTION strSplit(x VARCHAR(65000), delim VARCHAR(12), pos INTEGER) 
RETURNS VARCHAR(65000)
BEGIN
  DECLARE output VARCHAR(65000);
  SET output = REPLACE(SUBSTRING(SUBSTRING_INDEX(x, delim, pos)
                 , LENGTH(SUBSTRING_INDEX(x, delim, pos - 1)) + 1)
                 , delim
                 , '');
  IF output = '' THEN SET output = null; END IF;
  RETURN output;
END $$


CREATE PROCEDURE BadTableToGoodTable()
BEGIN
  DECLARE i INTEGER;

  SET i = 1;
  REPEAT
    INSERT INTO GoodTable (id, name)
      SELECT id, strSplit(name, ',', i) FROM BadTable
      WHERE strSplit(name, ',', i) IS NOT NULL;
    SET i = i + 1;
    UNTIL ROW_COUNT() = 0
  END REPEAT;
END $$

DELIMITER ;
  • thanks,but im only have privilidge readonly – AFD Jul 30 '13 at 9:25

My variant: stored procedure that takes table name, field names and delimiter as arguments. Inspired by post http://www.marcogoncalves.com/2011/03/mysql-split-column-string-into-rows/

delimiter $$

DROP PROCEDURE IF EXISTS split_value_into_multiple_rows $$
CREATE PROCEDURE split_value_into_multiple_rows(tablename VARCHAR(20),
    id_column VARCHAR(20), value_column VARCHAR(20), delim CHAR(1))
  BEGIN
    DECLARE id INT DEFAULT 0;
    DECLARE value VARCHAR(255);
    DECLARE occurrences INT DEFAULT 0;
    DECLARE i INT DEFAULT 0;
    DECLARE splitted_value VARCHAR(255);
    DECLARE done INT DEFAULT 0;
    DECLARE cur CURSOR FOR SELECT tmp_table1.id, tmp_table1.value FROM 
        tmp_table1 WHERE tmp_table1.value IS NOT NULL AND tmp_table1.value != '';
    DECLARE CONTINUE HANDLER FOR NOT FOUND SET done = 1;

    SET @expr = CONCAT('CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE tmp_table1 (id INT NOT NULL, value VARCHAR(255)) ENGINE=Memory SELECT ',
        id_column,' id, ', value_column,' value FROM ',tablename);
    PREPARE stmt FROM @expr;
    EXECUTE stmt;
    DEALLOCATE PREPARE stmt;

    DROP TEMPORARY TABLE IF EXISTS tmp_table2;
    CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE tmp_table2 (id INT NOT NULL, value VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL) ENGINE=Memory;

    OPEN cur;
      read_loop: LOOP
        FETCH cur INTO id, value;
        IF done THEN
          LEAVE read_loop;
        END IF;

        SET occurrences = (SELECT CHAR_LENGTH(value) -
                           CHAR_LENGTH(REPLACE(value, delim, '')) + 1);
        SET i=1;
        WHILE i <= occurrences DO
          SET splitted_value = (SELECT TRIM(SUBSTRING_INDEX(
              SUBSTRING_INDEX(value, delim, i), delim, -1)));
          INSERT INTO tmp_table2 VALUES (id, splitted_value);
          SET i = i + 1;
        END WHILE;
      END LOOP;

      SELECT * FROM tmp_table2;
    CLOSE cur;
    DROP TEMPORARY TABLE tmp_table1;
  END; $$

delimiter ;

Usage example (normalization):

CALL split_value_into_multiple_rows('my_contacts', 'contact_id', 'interests', ',');

CREATE TABLE interests (
  interest_id INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
  interest VARCHAR(30) NOT NULL
) SELECT DISTINCT value interest FROM tmp_table2;

CREATE TABLE contact_interest (
  contact_id INT NOT NULL,
  interest_id INT NOT NULL,
  CONSTRAINT fk_contact_interest_my_contacts_contact_id FOREIGN KEY (contact_id) REFERENCES my_contacts (contact_id),
  CONSTRAINT fk_contact_interest_interests_interest_id FOREIGN KEY (interest_id) REFERENCES interests (interest_id)
) SELECT my_contacts.contact_id, interests.interest_id
    FROM my_contacts, tmp_table2, interests
    WHERE my_contacts.contact_id = tmp_table2.id AND interests.interest = tmp_table2.value;
CREATE PROCEDURE `getVal`()
BEGIN
        declare r_len integer;
        declare r_id integer;
        declare r_val varchar(20);
        declare i integer;
        DECLARE found_row int(10);
        DECLARE row CURSOR FOR select length(replace(val,"|","")),id,val from split;
        create table x(id int,name varchar(20));
      open row;
            select FOUND_ROWS() into found_row ;
            read_loop: LOOP
                IF found_row = 0 THEN
                         LEAVE read_loop;
                END IF;
            set i = 1;  
            FETCH row INTO r_len,r_id,r_val;
            label1: LOOP        
                IF i <= r_len THEN
                  insert into x values( r_id,SUBSTRING(replace(r_val,"|",""),i,1));
                  SET i = i + 1;
                  ITERATE label1;
                END IF;
                LEAVE label1;
            END LOOP label1;
            set found_row = found_row - 1;
            END LOOP;
        close row;
        select * from x;
        drop table x;
END

Here is my solution

-- Create the maximum number of words we want to pick (indexes in n)
with recursive n(i) as (
    select
        1 i
    union all
    select i+1 from n where i < 1000
)
select distinct
    s.id,
    s.oaddress,
    -- n.i,
    -- use the index to pick the nth word, the last words will always repeat. Remove the duplicates with distinct
    if(instr(reverse(trim(substring_index(s.oaddress,' ',n.i))),' ') > 0,
        reverse(substr(reverse(trim(substring_index(s.oaddress,' ',n.i))),1,
            instr(reverse(trim(substring_index(s.oaddress,' ',n.i))),' '))),
        trim(substring_index(s.oaddress,' ',n.i))) oth
from 
    app_schools s,
    n

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