77

I have table :

id | name    
1  | a,b,c    
2  | b

i want output like this :

id | name    
1  | a    
1  | b    
1  | c    
2  | b
  • 5
    it's generally considered bad practice to store multiple values in the same database column. This best practice - normalisation - generally makes your database work better in future. It is explained here (or read up on 'normalisation') : stackoverflow.com/questions/2331838/… – Graham Griffiths Jul 30 '13 at 9:08
  • 4
    @GrahamGriffiths: I would agree with you, at least this is what academic knowledge tells. However, in my company there are lots of instances where they do this kind of stuff (storing multiple values in a delimited string fashion) in a single column, and their claim is that it is more efficient (join-free, and the processing required is not costly). I honestly do not know which point should be preferred. – Veverke Jan 11 '17 at 9:08
  • 1
    You'll also run into this if you're storing raw json in a JSON datatype. Normalized structure is better, but it also has the disadvantage of needing more up front dev, and is susceptible to break if the responses change, and you have to redevelop if you decide to change what you want out of the json. – Chris Strickland Jun 19 '19 at 14:34
125

If you can create a numbers table, that contains numbers from 1 to the maximum fields to split, you could use a solution like this:

select
  tablename.id,
  SUBSTRING_INDEX(SUBSTRING_INDEX(tablename.name, ',', numbers.n), ',', -1) name
from
  numbers inner join tablename
  on CHAR_LENGTH(tablename.name)
     -CHAR_LENGTH(REPLACE(tablename.name, ',', ''))>=numbers.n-1
order by
  id, n

Please see fiddle here.

If you cannot create a table, then a solution can be this:

select
  tablename.id,
  SUBSTRING_INDEX(SUBSTRING_INDEX(tablename.name, ',', numbers.n), ',', -1) name
from
  (select 1 n union all
   select 2 union all select 3 union all
   select 4 union all select 5) numbers INNER JOIN tablename
  on CHAR_LENGTH(tablename.name)
     -CHAR_LENGTH(REPLACE(tablename.name, ',', ''))>=numbers.n-1
order by
  id, n

an example fiddle is here.

| improve this answer | |
  • 15
    @user2577038 you could do it without a numbers table, see it here sqlfiddle.com/#!2/a213e4/1 – fthiella Jul 30 '13 at 9:33
  • 1
    An important thing to note is in the second example, the maximum number of "fields" separated by comma is 5. You can check the # of occurrences in a string via a method like the one here: stackoverflow.com/questions/12344795/…. Keep adding 'select [number] union all' clauses to the 'numbers' inline view until the number of rows returned stops increasing. – Bret Weinraub Jul 27 '16 at 21:04
  • 1
    As usual I keep stumbling into your useful code. If anyone wants the quick way to create a table similar to the top chunk shown here, here is a link using this routine here. That op was for a single string not a table of them. – Drew Sep 26 '16 at 7:40
  • How would a SQLite version of this look like? I get the following error: could not prepare statement (1 no such function: SUBSTRING_INDEX) – Remi Sture Nov 22 '16 at 8:29
  • Nice solution. But what if there are two columns to be split, ID name name1 and values 1| a,b,c | x,y,z @fthiella – syncdm2012 May 3 '18 at 11:42
7

If the name column were a JSON array (like '["a","b","c"]'), then you could extract/unpack it with JSON_TABLE() (available since MySQL 8.0.4):

select t.id, j.name
from mytable t
join json_table(
  t.name,
  '$[*]' columns (name varchar(50) path '$')
) j;

Result:

| id  | name |
| --- | ---- |
| 1   | a    |
| 1   | b    |
| 1   | c    |
| 2   | b    |

View on DB Fiddle

If you store the values in a simple CSV format, then you would first need to convert it to JSON:

select t.id, j.name
from mytable t
join json_table(
  replace(json_array(t.name), ',', '","'),
  '$[*]' columns (name varchar(50) path '$')
) j

Result:

| id  | name |
| --- | ---- |
| 1   | a    |
| 1   | b    |
| 1   | c    |
| 2   | b    |

View on DB Fiddle

| improve this answer | |
  • i get this error in DataGrip with MySQL 5.7.17, any ideas? I also tried copy-pasting verbatim the identical code from the DB Fiddle, which executes there but not locally. [42000][1064] You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near '( concat('[', replace(json_quote(t.name), ',', '","'), ']'), '$[*]' column' at line 3 – Ian Nastajus Mar 8 at 3:49
  • suspect need to upgrade to 8.x. – Ian Nastajus Mar 8 at 4:27
  • 1
    @IanNastajus - Yes, you need at least MySQL 8.0.4 – Paul Spiegel Mar 8 at 12:11
  • ...and confirmed. yeesh, upgrading a database can be such a hassle. the 8.x installer just wanted to upgrade parts to the latest 5.7.y, so i realized to satisfy the installer i'd have to uninstall 5.x first then reinstall with the exact same 8.x installer... yeesh :eye-roll: ... thankfully it worked just fine, and this was just for my own side projects, and wasn't acting as a full DBA for a large production system in this case... – Ian Nastajus Mar 9 at 16:20
6

I have take the reference from here with changed column name.

DELIMITER $$

CREATE FUNCTION strSplit(x VARCHAR(65000), delim VARCHAR(12), pos INTEGER) 
RETURNS VARCHAR(65000)
BEGIN
  DECLARE output VARCHAR(65000);
  SET output = REPLACE(SUBSTRING(SUBSTRING_INDEX(x, delim, pos)
                 , LENGTH(SUBSTRING_INDEX(x, delim, pos - 1)) + 1)
                 , delim
                 , '');
  IF output = '' THEN SET output = null; END IF;
  RETURN output;
END $$


CREATE PROCEDURE BadTableToGoodTable()
BEGIN
  DECLARE i INTEGER;

  SET i = 1;
  REPEAT
    INSERT INTO GoodTable (id, name)
      SELECT id, strSplit(name, ',', i) FROM BadTable
      WHERE strSplit(name, ',', i) IS NOT NULL;
    SET i = i + 1;
    UNTIL ROW_COUNT() = 0
  END REPEAT;
END $$

DELIMITER ;
| improve this answer | |
  • This helped me a lot, thanks! – Norbert Sep 10 at 14:08
4

My variant: stored procedure that takes table name, field names and delimiter as arguments. Inspired by post http://www.marcogoncalves.com/2011/03/mysql-split-column-string-into-rows/

delimiter $$

DROP PROCEDURE IF EXISTS split_value_into_multiple_rows $$
CREATE PROCEDURE split_value_into_multiple_rows(tablename VARCHAR(20),
    id_column VARCHAR(20), value_column VARCHAR(20), delim CHAR(1))
  BEGIN
    DECLARE id INT DEFAULT 0;
    DECLARE value VARCHAR(255);
    DECLARE occurrences INT DEFAULT 0;
    DECLARE i INT DEFAULT 0;
    DECLARE splitted_value VARCHAR(255);
    DECLARE done INT DEFAULT 0;
    DECLARE cur CURSOR FOR SELECT tmp_table1.id, tmp_table1.value FROM 
        tmp_table1 WHERE tmp_table1.value IS NOT NULL AND tmp_table1.value != '';
    DECLARE CONTINUE HANDLER FOR NOT FOUND SET done = 1;

    SET @expr = CONCAT('CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE tmp_table1 (id INT NOT NULL, value VARCHAR(255)) ENGINE=Memory SELECT ',
        id_column,' id, ', value_column,' value FROM ',tablename);
    PREPARE stmt FROM @expr;
    EXECUTE stmt;
    DEALLOCATE PREPARE stmt;

    DROP TEMPORARY TABLE IF EXISTS tmp_table2;
    CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE tmp_table2 (id INT NOT NULL, value VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL) ENGINE=Memory;

    OPEN cur;
      read_loop: LOOP
        FETCH cur INTO id, value;
        IF done THEN
          LEAVE read_loop;
        END IF;

        SET occurrences = (SELECT CHAR_LENGTH(value) -
                           CHAR_LENGTH(REPLACE(value, delim, '')) + 1);
        SET i=1;
        WHILE i <= occurrences DO
          SET splitted_value = (SELECT TRIM(SUBSTRING_INDEX(
              SUBSTRING_INDEX(value, delim, i), delim, -1)));
          INSERT INTO tmp_table2 VALUES (id, splitted_value);
          SET i = i + 1;
        END WHILE;
      END LOOP;

      SELECT * FROM tmp_table2;
    CLOSE cur;
    DROP TEMPORARY TABLE tmp_table1;
  END; $$

delimiter ;

Usage example (normalization):

CALL split_value_into_multiple_rows('my_contacts', 'contact_id', 'interests', ',');

CREATE TABLE interests (
  interest_id INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
  interest VARCHAR(30) NOT NULL
) SELECT DISTINCT value interest FROM tmp_table2;

CREATE TABLE contact_interest (
  contact_id INT NOT NULL,
  interest_id INT NOT NULL,
  CONSTRAINT fk_contact_interest_my_contacts_contact_id FOREIGN KEY (contact_id) REFERENCES my_contacts (contact_id),
  CONSTRAINT fk_contact_interest_interests_interest_id FOREIGN KEY (interest_id) REFERENCES interests (interest_id)
) SELECT my_contacts.contact_id, interests.interest_id
    FROM my_contacts, tmp_table2, interests
    WHERE my_contacts.contact_id = tmp_table2.id AND interests.interest = tmp_table2.value;
| improve this answer | |
  • Beautifully written. With a few changes I was able to incorporate this into my database to ensure it is in 1st normal form. Thank you. – raviabhiram Feb 22 '19 at 6:29
3

Here is my attempt: The first select presents the csv field to the split. Using recursive CTE, we can create a list of numbers that are limited to the number of terms in the csv field. The number of terms is just the difference in the length of the csv field and itself with all the delimiters removed. Then joining with this numbers, substring_index extracts that term.

with recursive
    T as ( select 'a,b,c,d,e,f' as items),
    N as ( select 1 as n union select n + 1 from N, T
        where n <= length(items) - length(replace(items, ',', '')))
    select distinct substring_index(substring_index(items, ',', n), ',', -1)
group_name from N, T
| improve this answer | |
1
CREATE PROCEDURE `getVal`()
BEGIN
        declare r_len integer;
        declare r_id integer;
        declare r_val varchar(20);
        declare i integer;
        DECLARE found_row int(10);
        DECLARE row CURSOR FOR select length(replace(val,"|","")),id,val from split;
        create table x(id int,name varchar(20));
      open row;
            select FOUND_ROWS() into found_row ;
            read_loop: LOOP
                IF found_row = 0 THEN
                         LEAVE read_loop;
                END IF;
            set i = 1;  
            FETCH row INTO r_len,r_id,r_val;
            label1: LOOP        
                IF i <= r_len THEN
                  insert into x values( r_id,SUBSTRING(replace(r_val,"|",""),i,1));
                  SET i = i + 1;
                  ITERATE label1;
                END IF;
                LEAVE label1;
            END LOOP label1;
            set found_row = found_row - 1;
            END LOOP;
        close row;
        select * from x;
        drop table x;
END
| improve this answer | |
1

The original question was for MySQL and SQL in general. The example below is for the new versions of MySQL. Unfortunately, a generic query that would work on any SQL server is not possible. Some servers do no support CTE, others do not have substring_index, yet others have built-in functions for splitting a string into multiple rows.

--- the answer follows ---

Recursive queries are convenient when the server does not provide built-in functionality. They can also be the bottleneck.

The following query was written and tested on MySQL version 8.0.16. It will not work on version 5.7-. The old versions do not support Common Table Expression (CTE) and thus recursive queries.

with recursive
  input as (
        select 1 as id, 'a,b,c' as names
      union
        select 2, 'b'
    ),
  recurs as (
        select id, 1 as pos, names as remain, substring_index( names, ',', 1 ) as name
          from input
      union all
        select id, pos + 1, substring( remain, char_length( name ) + 2 ),
            substring_index( substring( remain, char_length( name ) + 2 ), ',', 1 )
          from recurs
          where char_length( remain ) > char_length( name )
    )
select id, name
  from recurs
  order by id, pos;
| improve this answer | |
  • although this solution works, it makes any subsequent queries (i.e., select count(1) from tablename) either hang or take an incredibly long time. I have to close mysql workbench and re-open for subsequent queries to not hang anymore. Also, I wanted to use this solution to insert the result into a new table. However, this solution will not work if you have NULL values for your comma-separated values. I would still use the solution provided by @fthiella, but still glad to have found this solution. – kimbaudi Jul 7 '19 at 0:02
  • btw, i ran this query using MySQL 8.0.16 on a table with almost 6,000,000 records. – kimbaudi Jul 7 '19 at 0:16
0

Best Practice. Result:

SELECT
SUBSTRING_INDEX(SUBSTRING_INDEX('ab,bc,cd',',',help_id+1),',',-1) AS oid
FROM
(
SELECT @xi:=@xi+1 as help_id from 
(SELECT 1 UNION SELECT 2 UNION SELECT 3 UNION SELECT 4 UNION SELECT 5) xc1,
(SELECT 1 UNION SELECT 2 UNION SELECT 3 UNION SELECT 4 UNION SELECT 5) xc2,
(SELECT @xi:=-1) xc0
) a
WHERE 
help_id < LENGTH('ab,bc,cd')-LENGTH(REPLACE('ab,bc,cd',',',''))+1

First, create a numbers table:

SELECT @xi:=@xi+1 as help_id from 
(SELECT 1 UNION SELECT 2 UNION SELECT 3 UNION SELECT 4 UNION SELECT 5) xc1,
(SELECT 1 UNION SELECT 2 UNION SELECT 3 UNION SELECT 4 UNION SELECT 5) xc2,
(SELECT @xi:=-1) xc0;
| help_id  |
| --- |
| 0   |
| 1   |
| 2   |
| 3   |
| ...   |
| 24   |

Second, just split the str:

SELECT SUBSTRING_INDEX(SUBSTRING_INDEX('ab,bc,cd',',',help_id+1),',',-1) AS oid
FROM
numbers_table
WHERE
help_id < LENGTH('ab,bc,cd')-LENGTH(REPLACE('ab,bc,cd',',',''))+1
| oid  |
| --- |
| ab   |
| bc   |
| cd   |
| improve this answer | |
-1

Here is my solution

-- Create the maximum number of words we want to pick (indexes in n)
with recursive n(i) as (
    select
        1 i
    union all
    select i+1 from n where i < 1000
)
select distinct
    s.id,
    s.oaddress,
    -- n.i,
    -- use the index to pick the nth word, the last words will always repeat. Remove the duplicates with distinct
    if(instr(reverse(trim(substring_index(s.oaddress,' ',n.i))),' ') > 0,
        reverse(substr(reverse(trim(substring_index(s.oaddress,' ',n.i))),1,
            instr(reverse(trim(substring_index(s.oaddress,' ',n.i))),' '))),
        trim(substring_index(s.oaddress,' ',n.i))) oth
from 
    app_schools s,
    n
| improve this answer | |

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