13

How to easily print line above the match and skip the match itself? grep -A, -B and -o opt do not solve it. Maybe some awk magic?

for example:

$ cat foo.txt
bar
foo
baz
foo

$ cat foo.txt | grep foo-SOMETHING
bar
baz

Edit

  • in case when line 2 and 3 has "foo", then line 1 and 2 should be printed (although I am not very strict here)

Additional feature: consider the example:

bar
foo
baz
foo
foo

This should ideally return

bar
baz
foo
4
  • 1
    What's wrong with -B? Jul 30, 2013 at 9:56
  • 3
    @AdrianFrühwirth it prints the preceding line AND the matching line.
    – Barmar
    Jul 30, 2013 at 9:56
  • what about two continuous lines both match foo ? print the first line? or ignore both?
    – Kent
    Jul 30, 2013 at 9:57
  • @Barmar: I am aware of that, but that can be worked around against. Jul 30, 2013 at 9:58

3 Answers 3

19
awk '!/foo/ { line = $0 }
     /foo/ { print line }' foo.txt

The first clause saves each non-foo line in a variable. The second clause prints the most recent saved line when the line matches foo.

This also works (and handles the case where you have two foo lines in a row):

awk '/foo/ {print line}
     {line = $0}' foo.txt

With grep you can do:

grep -B 1 foo foo.txt | grep -vE 'foo|^--$'

The second command filters out the foo lines and the dividers that are printed between the matching blocks.

6
  • If a line containing foo should be printed when it is followed by a line matching foo, refactor to awk '/foo/{print line}{line=$0}' foo.txt
    – tripleee
    Jul 30, 2013 at 10:00
  • 1
    Shouldn't awk '/foo/{ print line } { line = $0 }' foo.txt be sufficient? Jul 30, 2013 at 10:01
  • @AdrianFrühwirth: Please post it as an answer, it behaves better in when dealing with repeated matching pattern (see edited question)
    – Jakub M.
    Jul 30, 2013 at 10:10
  • @JakubM. It's in my answer, also Vijay's answer.
    – Barmar
    Jul 30, 2013 at 10:14
  • @Barmar: I thought Adrian was first before you, sorry if I am wrong
    – Jakub M.
    Jul 30, 2013 at 10:27
3

Just set p to the pattern you want:

$ awk '$0~p{print a}{a=$0}' p="foo" file
bar
baz
foo
2
awk '/foo/{print a}{a=$0}' your_file

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