6

Pardon my questions, as I'm still very new to programming so I don't fully understand the concepts of mainthreads, and async tasks, and services, and threads. I'm reading the documentation about Services for Android because I want to perform some tasks off the main thread. It says:

If you need to perform work outside your main thread, but only while the user is interacting with your application, then you should probably instead create a new thread and not a service.

1.Are they saying that a "thread" stops immediately after you leave the app (i.e: Home button)?

For example, if you want to play some music, but only while your activity is running, you might create a thread in onCreate(), start running it in onStart(), then stop it in onStop(). Also consider using AsyncTask or HandlerThread, instead of the traditional Thread class. See the Processes and Threading document for more information about threads.

2.If threads are baked into Java, why does android have AsyncTasks?

Remember that if you do use a service, it still runs in your application's main thread by default, so you should still create a new thread within the service if it performs intensive or blocking operations.

3.Does this basically mean, that almost every service is basically going to have a thread created inside it?

4.Would it be bad to start an AsyncTask inside of a service?

11

1.Are they saying that a "thread" stops immediately after you leave the app (i.e: Home button)?

A Thread should be destroyed when the Thread that started it is destroyed. So, if you start a Thread in an Activity then it should be destroyed when that Activity is destroyed or transferred to a Service. For instance, you can start music in a Thread and update the songs there but if you want it to keep playing when the Activity is destroyed then it should be moved to a Service

2.If threads are baked into Java, why does android have AsyncTasks?

An AsyncTask allows you to perform background work and easily update the UI before, during, and after the background work is done by utilizing any of its built-in methods except for doInBackground() because it is the only one that doesn't run on the UI Thread

3.Does this basically mean, that almost every service is basically going to have a thread created inside it?

Not necessarily but you could create a Thread inside of it

4.Would it be bad to start an AsyncTask inside of a service?

No. You could do this.

AsyncTask is a great way to do background work. Its methods make it very easy to update the UI. But you need to read through the documentation carefully (maybe even a few times) to make sure you completely understand how to use them. Also, remember that these are for short-lived operations so they can be good for downloading network data but shouldn't be used for things that last more than a few seconds (According to the docs)

5
  1. A thread doesn't stop immediately when you leave the app. The suggestion to use a separate thread is only so you don't block your app's GUI.

  2. AsyncTasks actually use a ThreadPool behind the scenes as creating a thread is an expensive process. If you have many short lived tasks, using AsyncTask is just a quick, easy, but efficient way to execute them without blocking your application's GUI.

  3. Yes, essentially. A service is more heavy weight than a thread though. Using a service in place of a thread is not a good idea. Also services can actually be made to execute on a whole other process. Just FYI.

  4. No. It would be a good idea, if you've many short lived tasks to execute.

If you are only trying to execute tasks off the main thread, you don't need a service. Just create another thread.

AsyncTask behind the scenes just submits your task to a thread pool for execution. If you have many short lived tasks, like parsing networking traffic, AsyncTask is great.

However, if you are handling a huge amount of requests, you might want more control over the thread pool executing your tasks.

  • you should've specified that asynctasks are used to do heavy lifting! That's one of the main purposes an asynctask has – Dante Jul 30 '13 at 18:21
  • 3
    No, you just need to do networking on a non-gui thread. As the Async task executes on a non-gui thread it can be used, but it is not the only solution. @Dante No, AsyncTask are not necessarily for heavy lifting. – William Morrison Jul 30 '13 at 18:22
  • @Keyser it depends on how much control you need of the threadpool really. An AsyncTask is just a quick way to access a threadpool. If you want to write an app which handles a huge amount of traffic, I would use something other than AsyncTask for control over performance tuning. – William Morrison Jul 30 '13 at 18:25
1
  1. No

  2. Because a main thread controls the UI while asynctasks can make heavier tasks while keeping the UI lag-free.

  3. No, but if you want your service to make heavy lifting like loading stuff from internet then it should use an asynctask. Most services are used to load data from internet so most of them have asynctasks. Note that for the service to be kept alive after the activity dies, you must specify it. Services by default die along with the activity unless configured properly

  4. No

  • my bad, just re checked it on my app :P – Dante Jul 30 '13 at 18:23
  • 1
    You and I generally agree, there's no point to argue here. Good job +1 – William Morrison Jul 30 '13 at 18:23
0

You might be confusing by thread and task and process.Task is small kind of process.An process is a pro-gramme that running in your system example when start your task-manager it is showing all the process running like Internet-explorer but thread is small lightweight process means you can say sub-process that in execution for performing some task but asynchronous in android is just similar to thread but it may-be long.Take a example in android you are playing temple-run in android-phone ,and some-one is calling you so that high priority task will performed and current thread is paused there and so many method are there like onCreate() ,onPause(),you can understand it.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.