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I am running into a huge performance bottleneck when using Azure table storage. My desire is to use tables as a sort of cache, so a long process may result in anywhere from hundreds to several thousand rows of data. The data can then be quickly queried by partition and row keys.

The querying is working pretty fast (extremely fast when only using partition and row keys, a bit slower, but still acceptable when also searching through properties for a particular match).

However, both inserting and deleting rows is painfully slow.

Clarification

I want to clarify that even inserting a single batch of 100 items takes several seconds. This isn't just a problem with total throughput of thousands of rows. It is affecting me when I only insert 100.

Here is an example of my code to do a batch insert to my table:

static async Task BatchInsert( CloudTable table, List<ITableEntity> entities )
    {
        int rowOffset = 0;

        while ( rowOffset < entities.Count )
        {
            Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();

            var batch = new TableBatchOperation();

            // next batch
            var rows = entities.Skip( rowOffset ).Take( 100 ).ToList();

            foreach ( var row in rows )
                batch.Insert( row );

            // submit
            await table.ExecuteBatchAsync( batch );

            rowOffset += rows.Count;

            Trace.TraceInformation( "Elapsed time to batch insert " + rows.Count + " rows: " + sw.Elapsed.ToString( "g" ) );
        }
    }

I am using batch operations, and here is one sample of debug output:

Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage Information: 3 : b08a07da-fceb-4bec-af34-3beaa340239b: Starting asynchronous request to http://127.0.0.1:10002/devstoreaccount1.
Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage Verbose: 4 : b08a07da-fceb-4bec-af34-3beaa340239b: StringToSign = POST..multipart/mixed; boundary=batch_6d86d34c-5e0e-4c0c-8135-f9788ae41748.Tue, 30 Jul 2013 18:48:38 GMT./devstoreaccount1/devstoreaccount1/$batch.
Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage Information: 3 : b08a07da-fceb-4bec-af34-3beaa340239b: Preparing to write request data.
Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage Information: 3 : b08a07da-fceb-4bec-af34-3beaa340239b: Writing request data.
Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage Information: 3 : b08a07da-fceb-4bec-af34-3beaa340239b: Waiting for response.
Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage Information: 3 : b08a07da-fceb-4bec-af34-3beaa340239b: Response received. Status code = 202, Request ID = , Content-MD5 = , ETag = .
Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage Information: 3 : b08a07da-fceb-4bec-af34-3beaa340239b: Response headers were processed successfully, proceeding with the rest of the operation.
Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage Information: 3 : b08a07da-fceb-4bec-af34-3beaa340239b: Processing response body.
Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage Information: 3 : b08a07da-fceb-4bec-af34-3beaa340239b: Operation completed successfully.
iisexpress.exe Information: 0 : Elapsed time to batch insert 100 rows: 0:00:00.9351871

As you can see, this example takes almost 1 second to insert 100 rows. The average seems to be about .8 seconds on my dev machine (3.4 Ghz quad core).

This seems ridiculous.

Here is an example of a batch delete operation:

Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage Information: 3 : 4c271cb5-7463-44b1-b2e5-848b8fb10a93: Starting asynchronous request to http://127.0.0.1:10002/devstoreaccount1.
Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage Verbose: 4 : 4c271cb5-7463-44b1-b2e5-848b8fb10a93: StringToSign = POST..multipart/mixed; boundary=batch_7e3d229f-f8ac-4aa0-8ce9-ed00cb0ba321.Tue, 30 Jul 2013 18:47:41 GMT./devstoreaccount1/devstoreaccount1/$batch.
Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage Information: 3 : 4c271cb5-7463-44b1-b2e5-848b8fb10a93: Preparing to write request data.
Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage Information: 3 : 4c271cb5-7463-44b1-b2e5-848b8fb10a93: Writing request data.
Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage Information: 3 : 4c271cb5-7463-44b1-b2e5-848b8fb10a93: Waiting for response.
Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage Information: 3 : 4c271cb5-7463-44b1-b2e5-848b8fb10a93: Response received. Status code = 202, Request ID = , Content-MD5 = , ETag = .
Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage Information: 3 : 4c271cb5-7463-44b1-b2e5-848b8fb10a93: Response headers were processed successfully, proceeding with the rest of the operation.
Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage Information: 3 : 4c271cb5-7463-44b1-b2e5-848b8fb10a93: Processing response body.
Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage Information: 3 : 4c271cb5-7463-44b1-b2e5-848b8fb10a93: Operation completed successfully.
iisexpress.exe Information: 0 : Elapsed time to batch delete 100 rows: 0:00:00.6524402

Consistently over .5 seconds.

I ran this deployed to Azure (small instance) as well, and have recorded times of 20 minutes to insert 28000 rows.

I am currently using the 2.1 RC version of the Storage Client Library: MSDN Blog

I must be doing something very wrong. Any thoughts?

UPDATE

I've tried parallelism with the net effect of an overall speed improvement (and 8 maxed out logical processors), but still barely 150 row inserts per second on my dev machine.

No better overall that I can tell, and maybe even worse when deployed to Azure (small instance).

I've increased the thread pool, and increase the max number of HTTP connections for my WebRole by following this advice.

I still feel that I am missing something fundamental that is limiting my inserts/deletes to 150 ROPS.

UPDATE 2

After analyzing the some diagnostics logs from my small instance deployed to Azure (using the new logging built in to the 2.1 RC Storage Client), I have a bit more information.

The first storage client log for a batch insert is at 635109046781264034 ticks:

caf06fca-1857-4875-9923-98979d850df3: Starting synchronous request to https://?.table.core.windows.net/.; TraceSource 'Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage' event

Then almost 3 seconds later I see this log at 635109046810104314 ticks:

caf06fca-1857-4875-9923-98979d850df3: Preparing to write request data.; TraceSource 'Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage' event

Then a few more logs which take up a combined 0.15 seconds ending with this one at 635109046811645418 ticks which wraps up the insert:

caf06fca-1857-4875-9923-98979d850df3: Operation completed successfully.; TraceSource 'Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage' event

I'm not sure what to make of this, but it is pretty consistent across the batch insert logs that I examined.

UPDATE 3

Here is the code used to batch insert in parallel. In this code, just for testing, I am ensuring that I am inserting each batch of 100 into a unique partition.

static async Task BatchInsert( CloudTable table, List<ITableEntity> entities )
    {
        int rowOffset = 0;

        var tasks = new List<Task>();

        while ( rowOffset < entities.Count )
        {
            // next batch
            var rows = entities.Skip( rowOffset ).Take( 100 ).ToList();

            rowOffset += rows.Count;

            string partition = "$" + rowOffset.ToString();

            var task = Task.Factory.StartNew( () =>
                {
                    Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();

                    var batch = new TableBatchOperation();

                    foreach ( var row in rows )
                    {
                        row.PartitionKey = row.PartitionKey + partition;
                        batch.InsertOrReplace( row );
                    }

                    // submit
                    table.ExecuteBatch( batch );

                    Trace.TraceInformation( "Elapsed time to batch insert " + rows.Count + " rows: " + sw.Elapsed.ToString( "F2" ) );
                } );

            tasks.Add( task );
        }

        await Task.WhenAll( tasks );
    }

As stated above, this does help improve the overall time to insert thousands of rows, but each batch of 100 still takes several seconds.

UPDATE 4

So I created a brand new Azure Cloud Service project, using VS2012.2, with the Web Role as a single page template (the new one with the TODO sample in it).

This is straight out of the box, no new NuGet packages or anything. It uses the Storage client library v2 by default, and the EDM and associated libraries v5.2.

I simply modified the HomeController code to be the following (using some random data to simulate the columns that I want to store in the real app):

public ActionResult Index( string returnUrl )
    {
        ViewBag.ReturnUrl = returnUrl;

        Task.Factory.StartNew( () =>
            {
                TableTest();
            } );

        return View();
    }

    static Random random = new Random();
    static double RandomDouble( double maxValue )
    {
        // the Random class is not thread safe!
        lock ( random ) return random.NextDouble() * maxValue;
    }

    void TableTest()
    {
        // Retrieve storage account from connection-string
        CloudStorageAccount storageAccount = CloudStorageAccount.Parse(
            CloudConfigurationManager.GetSetting( "CloudStorageConnectionString" ) );

        // create the table client
        CloudTableClient tableClient = storageAccount.CreateCloudTableClient();

        // retrieve the table
        CloudTable table = tableClient.GetTableReference( "test" );

        // create it if it doesn't already exist
        if ( table.CreateIfNotExists() )
        {
            // the container is new and was just created
            Trace.TraceInformation( "Created table named " + "test" );
        }


        Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();

        // create a bunch of objects
        int count = 28000;
        List<DynamicTableEntity> entities = new List<DynamicTableEntity>( count );

        for ( int i = 0; i < count; i++ )
        {
            var row = new DynamicTableEntity()
            {
                PartitionKey = "filename.txt",
                RowKey = string.Format( "$item{0:D10}", i ),
            };

            row.Properties.Add( "Name", EntityProperty.GeneratePropertyForString( i.ToString() ) );
            row.Properties.Add( "Data", EntityProperty.GeneratePropertyForString( string.Format( "data{0}", i ) ) );
            row.Properties.Add( "Value1", EntityProperty.GeneratePropertyForDouble( RandomDouble( 10000 ) ) );
            row.Properties.Add( "Value2", EntityProperty.GeneratePropertyForDouble( RandomDouble( 10000 ) ) );
            row.Properties.Add( "Value3", EntityProperty.GeneratePropertyForDouble( RandomDouble( 1000 ) ) );
            row.Properties.Add( "Value4", EntityProperty.GeneratePropertyForDouble( RandomDouble( 90 ) ) );
            row.Properties.Add( "Value5", EntityProperty.GeneratePropertyForDouble( RandomDouble( 180 ) ) );
            row.Properties.Add( "Value6", EntityProperty.GeneratePropertyForDouble( RandomDouble( 1000 ) ) );

            entities.Add( row );
        }

        Trace.TraceInformation( "Elapsed time to create record rows: " + sw.Elapsed.ToString() );

        sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();

        Trace.TraceInformation( "Inserting rows" );

        // batch our inserts (100 max)
        BatchInsert( table, entities ).Wait();

        Trace.TraceInformation( "Successfully inserted " + entities.Count + " rows into table " + table.Name );
        Trace.TraceInformation( "Elapsed time: " + sw.Elapsed.ToString() );

        Trace.TraceInformation( "Done" );
    }


            static async Task BatchInsert( CloudTable table, List<DynamicTableEntity> entities )
    {
        int rowOffset = 0;

        var tasks = new List<Task>();

        while ( rowOffset < entities.Count )
        {
            // next batch
            var rows = entities.Skip( rowOffset ).Take( 100 ).ToList();

            rowOffset += rows.Count;

            string partition = "$" + rowOffset.ToString();

            var task = Task.Factory.StartNew( () =>
            {
                var batch = new TableBatchOperation();

                foreach ( var row in rows )
                {
                    row.PartitionKey = row.PartitionKey + partition;
                    batch.InsertOrReplace( row );
                }

                // submit
                table.ExecuteBatch( batch );

                Trace.TraceInformation( "Inserted batch for partition " + partition );
            } );

            tasks.Add( task );
        }

        await Task.WhenAll( tasks );
    }

And this is the output I get:

iisexpress.exe Information: 0 : Elapsed time to create record rows: 00:00:00.0719448
iisexpress.exe Information: 0 : Inserting rows
iisexpress.exe Information: 0 : Inserted batch for partition $100
...
iisexpress.exe Information: 0 : Successfully inserted 28000 rows into table test
iisexpress.exe Information: 0 : Elapsed time: 00:01:07.1398928

This is a bit faster than in my other app, at over 460 ROPS. This is still unacceptable. And again in this test, my CPU (8 logical processors) is nearly maxed out, and disk access is nearly idle.

I am at a loss as to what is wrong.

UPDATE 5

Round and round of fiddling and tweaking have yielded some improvements, but I just can't get it much faster than 500-700(ish) ROPS doing batch InsertOrReplace operations (in batches of 100).

This test is done in the Azure cloud, using a small instance (or two). Based on comments below I'm resigned to the fact that local testing will be slow at best.

Here are a couple of examples. Each example is it's very own PartitionKey:

Successfully inserted 904 rows into table org1; TraceSource 'w3wp.exe' event
Elapsed time: 00:00:01.3401031; TraceSource 'w3wp.exe' event

Successfully inserted 4130 rows into table org1; TraceSource 'w3wp.exe' event
Elapsed time: 00:00:07.3522871; TraceSource 'w3wp.exe' event

Successfully inserted 28020 rows into table org1; TraceSource 'w3wp.exe' event
Elapsed time: 00:00:51.9319217; TraceSource 'w3wp.exe' event

Maybe it's my MSDN Azure account that has some performance caps? I don't know.

At this point I think I'm done with this. Maybe it's fast enough to use for my purposes, or maybe I'll follow a different path.

CONCLUSION

All answers below are good!

For my specific question, I've been able to see speeds up to 2k ROPS on a small Azure instance, more typically around 1k. Since I need to keep costs down (and therefore instance sizes down), this defines what I will be able to use tables for.

Thanks everyone for all the help.

  • can you add this, call it before and post the results? int iMinThreadWorkers, iMinThreadPorts, iMaxThreadWorkers, iMaxThreadPorts, iAvialbleThreadWorkers, iAvailableThreadPorts; ThreadPool.GetMinThreads(out iMinThreadWorkers, out iMinThreadPorts); ThreadPool.GetMaxThreads(out iMaxThreadWorkers, out iMaxThreadPorts); ThreadPool.GetAvailableThreads(out iAvailableThreadPorts, out iAvialbleThreadWorkers); – JTtheGeek Aug 1 '13 at 22:47
  • Progress! Have your code running in our test system and yes it is like 3000x slower than the one I gave you.... I'm looking into it – JTtheGeek Aug 1 '13 at 23:10
  • Thanks for the continued help @JTtheGeek, it's really appreciated! Here are the values: iMinThreadWorkers 8, iMinThreadPorts 8, iMaxThreadWorkers 32767, iMaxThreadPorts 1000, iAvialbleThreadWorkers 1000, iAvailableThreadPorts 32766 – Keith Murray Aug 2 '13 at 18:05
  • check your logs - C:\Users[User]\AppData\Local\DevelopmentStorage – JTtheGeek Aug 5 '13 at 19:32
  • It looks like ~700 op/sec is the internal speed of the storage. I wrote a very primitive REST client and I get ~140 updates/sec on my machine and ~700 inside Azure WITHOUT batch operations. I.e. I do individual HTTP request for each insert (I know it costs more money, but the difference is negligible in my case). The only thing that mattered was to increase ServicePointManager.DefaultConnectionLimit to 10 and run inserts in 10 threads. I tried different numbers, but 10 and 100 did not make much difference. – Ivan Krivyakov Apr 16 '15 at 21:52
10

Ok, 3rd answers a charm?

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/windowsazurestorage/archive/2010/11/06/how-to-get-most-out-of-windows-azure-tables.aspx

A couple things - the storage emulator - from a friend that did some serious digging into it.

"Everything is hitting a single table in a single database (more partitions doesn't affect anything). Each table insert operation is at least 3 sql operations. Every batch is inside a transaction. Depending on transaction isolation level, those batches will have limited ability to execute in parallel.

Serial batches should be faster than individual inserts due to sql server behavior. (Individual inserts are essentially little transactions that each flush to disk, while a real transaction flushes to disk as a group)."

IE using multiple partitions dosen't affect performance on the emulator while it does against real azure storage.

Also enable logging and check your logs a little - c:\users\username\appdata\local\developmentstorage

Batch size of 100 seems to offer the best real performance, turn off naggle, turn off expect 100, beef up the connection limit.

Also make damn sure you are not accidentally inserting duplicates, that will cause an error and slow everything way way way down.

and test against real storage. There's a pretty decent library out there that handles most of this for you - http://www.nuget.org/packages/WindowsAzure.StorageExtensions/, just make sure you actually call ToList on the adds and such as it won't really execute till enumerated. Also that library uses dynamictableentity and thus there's a small perf hit for the serialization, but it does allow you to use pure POCO objects with no TableEntity stuff.

~ JT

  • and finally add this - <system.net> <connectionManagement> <add address="*" maxconnection="12"/> </connectionManagement> </system.net> – JTtheGeek Aug 6 '13 at 23:59
  • Thanks for the continued support in looking into this. I've been able to achieve some improvement, but I'm still unable to get more than 500ish ROPS doing inserts in my small Azure instance. Maybe there is a cap on my MSDN Azure subscription? Everything seems to work, just not as fast as I expected. – Keith Murray Aug 8 '13 at 0:29
  • I marked this one as the answer because it specifically addressed the extremely slow performance I was seeing on my local PC. Though all of the comments and answers by @JTtheGeek are helpful. – Keith Murray Aug 8 '13 at 15:40
13

basic concept - use paralleism to speed this up.

step 1 - give your threadpool enough threads to pull this off - ThreadPool.SetMinThreads(1024, 256);

step 2 - use partitions. I use guids as Ids, i use the last to characters to split into 256 unique partitons (actually I group those into N subsets in my case 48 partitions)

step 3 - insert using tasks, i use object pooling for table refs

public List<T> InsertOrUpdate(List<T> items)
        {
            var subLists = SplitIntoPartitionedSublists(items);

            var tasks = new List<Task>();

            foreach (var subList in subLists)
            {
                List<T> list = subList;
                var task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
                    {
                        var batchOp = new TableBatchOperation();
                        var tableRef = GetTableRef();

                        foreach (var item in list)
                        {
                            batchOp.Add(TableOperation.InsertOrReplace(item));
                        }

                        tableRef.ExecuteBatch(batchOp);
                        ReleaseTableRef(tableRef);
                    });
                tasks.Add(task);
            }

            Task.WaitAll(tasks.ToArray());

            return items;
        }

private IEnumerable<List<T>> SplitIntoPartitionedSublists(IEnumerable<T> items)
        {
            var itemsByPartion = new Dictionary<string, List<T>>();

            //split items into partitions
            foreach (var item in items)
            {
                var partition = GetPartition(item);
                if (itemsByPartion.ContainsKey(partition) == false)
                {
                    itemsByPartion[partition] = new List<T>();
                }
                item.PartitionKey = partition;
                item.ETag = "*";
                itemsByPartion[partition].Add(item);
            }

            //split into subsets
            var subLists = new List<List<T>>();
            foreach (var partition in itemsByPartion.Keys)
            {
                var partitionItems = itemsByPartion[partition];
                for (int i = 0; i < partitionItems.Count; i += MaxBatch)
                {
                    subLists.Add(partitionItems.Skip(i).Take(MaxBatch).ToList());
                }
            }

            return subLists;
        }

        private void BuildPartitionIndentifiers(int partitonCount)
        {
            var chars = new char[] { '0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9', 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f' }.ToList();
            var keys = new List<string>();

            for (int i = 0; i < chars.Count; i++)
            {
                var keyA = chars[i];
                for (int j = 0; j < chars.Count; j++)
                {
                    var keyB = chars[j];
                    keys.Add(string.Concat(keyA, keyB));
                }
            }


            var keySetMaxSize = Math.Max(1, (int)Math.Floor((double)keys.Count / ((double)partitonCount)));
            var keySets = new List<List<string>>();

            if (partitonCount > keys.Count)
            {
                partitonCount = keys.Count;
            }

            //Build the key sets
            var index = 0;
            while (index < keys.Count)
            {
                var keysSet = keys.Skip(index).Take(keySetMaxSize).ToList();
                keySets.Add(keysSet);
                index += keySetMaxSize;
            }

            //build the lookups and datatable for each key set
            _partitions = new List<string>();
            for (int i = 0; i < keySets.Count; i++)
            {
                var partitionName = String.Concat("subSet_", i);
                foreach (var key in keySets[i])
                {
                    _partitionByKey[key] = partitionName;
                }
                _partitions.Add(partitionName);
            }

        }

        private string GetPartition(T item)
        {
            var partKey = item.Id.ToString().Substring(34,2);
            return _partitionByKey[partKey];
        }

        private string GetPartition(Guid id)
        {
            var partKey = id.ToString().Substring(34, 2);
            return _partitionByKey[partKey];
        }

        private CloudTable GetTableRef()
        {
            CloudTable tableRef = null;
            //try to pop a table ref out of the stack
            var foundTableRefInStack = _tableRefs.TryPop(out tableRef);
            if (foundTableRefInStack == false)
            {
                //no table ref available must create a new one
                var client = _account.CreateCloudTableClient();
                client.RetryPolicy = new ExponentialRetry(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1), 4);
                tableRef = client.GetTableReference(_sTableName);
            }

            //ensure table is created
            if (_bTableCreated != true)
            {
                tableRef.CreateIfNotExists();
                _bTableCreated = true;
            }

            return tableRef;
        }

result - 19-22kops storage account maximum

hit me up if your interested in the full source

need moar? use multiple storage accounts!

this is from months of trial and error, testing, beating my head against a desk. I really hope it helps.

  • Thanks for the answer. I went ahead and implemented a simpler variation of this, still using parallel Tasks as you suggest, with a max of 100 items in each partition. Inserting 28k rows this way took over 3 minutes on my dev machine, with my CPU pretty much maxed out. This is about 155 rops which is terrible and pretty much the same rate as without parallelism. The same test in Azure fared much worse on a small instance (as I would expect) with maxed CPU slow inserts. – Keith Murray Jul 31 '13 at 21:50
  • so you need to batch those in batches of 100, each batch needs to contain only a specific partition set and use that in tasks. It sounds like your mixing items and not batching correctly, if u can send me a small test project showing your issue and ill take a look – JTtheGeek Aug 1 '13 at 1:16
  • That is exactly what I am doing, inserting batches of 100, each batch with a unique PartitionKey, all in parallel. And I should clarify that even inserting one batch of 100 takes several seconds, both locally and in Azure. – Keith Murray Aug 1 '13 at 16:45
  • Something very bizarre is going on, can you post your updated code a bit to look at? – JTtheGeek Aug 1 '13 at 17:12
  • 1
    ->"Do not use Parallel.for though, it blows", you can set the MaxDegreeOfParallelism to decide how many parallel tasks are triggered. – Amit Jul 17 '14 at 19:09
6

After going through lots of pain, experiments, finally been able to got optimal throughput for single table partition (2,000+ batch write operations per second) and much better throughput in storage account (3,500+ batch write operations per second) with Azure Table storage. I tried all different approaches, but setting the .net connection limit programmatically (I tried the configuration sample, but didn't work for me) solved the problem (based on a White Paper provided by Microsoft), as shown below:

ServicePoint tableServicePoint = ServicePointManager
    .FindServicePoint(_StorageAccount.TableEndpoint);

//This is a notorious issue that has affected many developers. By default, the value 
//for the number of .NET HTTP connections is 2.
//This implies that only 2 concurrent connections can be maintained. This manifests itself
//as "underlying connection was closed..." when the number of concurrent requests is
//greater than 2.

tableServicePoint.ConnectionLimit = 1000;

Anyone else who got 20K+ batch write operation per storage account, please share your experience.

  • do you have any updates? – Mahmoud Samy Nov 23 '13 at 1:12
  • 1
    Do we have anyone who hit the 2000+ batch operations per second willing to share updates or code? – drobertson Mar 9 '15 at 16:21
  • 1
    I got 2.5k op/s with this ConnectionLimit parameter. If the parameter is not set, I was able to do only ~100 op/s – Horia Toma Jan 11 '17 at 15:00
  • Maybe this page can help others: blogs.msmvps.com/nunogodinho/2013/11/20/… – Horia Toma Jan 11 '17 at 15:09
5

For more fun, here's a new answer - isolated independent test that's pulling some amazing numbers for write performance on production and does a hell of a lot better avoiding IO blocking and connection management. I'm very interested to see how this works for you as we are getting ridiculous write speeds ( > 7kps).

webconfig

 <system.net>
    <connectionManagement>
      <add address="*" maxconnection="48"/>
    </connectionManagement>
  </system.net>

For the test i was using parameters based on volume, so like 25000 items, 24 partitions, batchsize of 100 seems to always be the best, and ref count of 20. This is using TPL dataflow (http://www.nuget.org/packages/Microsoft.Tpl.Dataflow/) for BufflerBlock which provides a nice awaitable thread safe table reference pulling.

public class DyanmicBulkInsertTestPooledRefsAndAsynch : WebTest, IDynamicWebTest
{
    private int _itemCount;
    private int _partitionCount;
    private int _batchSize;
    private List<TestTableEntity> _items;
    private GuidIdPartitionSplitter<TestTableEntity> _partitionSplitter;
    private string _tableName;
    private CloudStorageAccount _account;
    private CloudTableClient _tableClient;
    private Dictionary<string, List<TestTableEntity>> _itemsByParition;
    private int _maxRefCount;
    private BufferBlock<CloudTable> _tableRefs;


    public DyanmicBulkInsertTestPooledRefsAndAsynch()
    {
        Properties = new List<ItemProp>();    
        Properties.Add(new ItemProp("ItemCount", typeof(int)));
        Properties.Add(new ItemProp("PartitionCount", typeof(int)));
        Properties.Add(new ItemProp("BatchSize", typeof(int)));
        Properties.Add(new ItemProp("MaxRefs", typeof(int)));


    }

    public List<ItemProp> Properties { get; set; }

    public void SetProps(Dictionary<string, object> propValuesByPropName)
    {
        _itemCount = (int)propValuesByPropName["ItemCount"];
        _partitionCount = (int)propValuesByPropName["PartitionCount"];
        _batchSize = (int)propValuesByPropName["BatchSize"];
        _maxRefCount = (int)propValuesByPropName["MaxRefs"];
    }

    protected override void SetupTest()
    {
        base.SetupTest();

        ThreadPool.SetMinThreads(1024, 256);
        ServicePointManager.DefaultConnectionLimit = 256;
        ServicePointManager.UseNagleAlgorithm = false;
        ServicePointManager.Expect100Continue = false;


        _account = CloudStorageAccount.Parse(CloudConfigurationManager.GetSetting("DataConnectionString"));
        _tableClient = _account.CreateCloudTableClient();
        _tableName = "testtable" + new Random().Next(100000);

        //create the refs
        _tableRefs = new BufferBlock<CloudTable>();
        for (int i = 0; i < _maxRefCount; i++)
        {
            _tableRefs.Post(_tableClient.GetTableReference(_tableName));
        }

        var tableRefTask = GetTableRef();
        tableRefTask.Wait();
        var tableRef = tableRefTask.Result;

        tableRef.CreateIfNotExists();
        ReleaseRef(tableRef);

        _items = TestUtils.GenerateTableItems(_itemCount);
        _partitionSplitter = new GuidIdPartitionSplitter<TestTableEntity>();
        _partitionSplitter.BuildPartitions(_partitionCount);

        _items.ForEach(o =>
            {
                o.ETag = "*";
                o.Timestamp = DateTime.Now;
                o.PartitionKey = _partitionSplitter.GetPartition(o);
            });

        _itemsByParition = _partitionSplitter.SplitIntoPartitionedSublists(_items);
    }

    private async Task<CloudTable> GetTableRef()
    {
        return await _tableRefs.ReceiveAsync();            
    }

    private void ReleaseRef(CloudTable tableRef)
    {
        _tableRefs.Post(tableRef);
    }

    protected override void ExecuteTest()
    {
        Task.WaitAll(_itemsByParition.Keys.Select(parition => Task.Factory.StartNew(() => InsertParitionItems(_itemsByParition[parition]))).ToArray());
    }

    private void InsertParitionItems(List<TestTableEntity> items)
    {

        var tasks = new List<Task>();

        for (int i = 0; i < items.Count; i += _batchSize)
        {
            int i1 = i;

            var task = Task.Factory.StartNew(async () =>
            {
                var batchItems = items.Skip(i1).Take(_batchSize).ToList();

                if (batchItems.Select(o => o.PartitionKey).Distinct().Count() > 1)
                {
                    throw new Exception("Multiple partitions batch");
                }

                var batchOp = new TableBatchOperation();
                batchItems.ForEach(batchOp.InsertOrReplace);   

                var tableRef = GetTableRef.Result();
                tableRef.ExecuteBatch(batchOp);
                ReleaseRef(tableRef);
            });

            tasks.Add(task);

        }

        Task.WaitAll(tasks.ToArray());


    }

    protected override void CleanupTest()
    {
        var tableRefTask = GetTableRef();
        tableRefTask.Wait();
        var tableRef = tableRefTask.Result;
        tableRef.DeleteIfExists();
        ReleaseRef(tableRef);
    }

We are currently working on a version that can handle multiple storage accounts to hopefully get some insane speeds. Also, we are running these on 8 core virtual machines for large datasets, but with the new non blocking IO it should run great on a limited vm. Good luck!

 public class SimpleGuidIdPartitionSplitter<T> where T : IUniqueId
{
    private ConcurrentDictionary<string, string> _partitionByKey = new ConcurrentDictionary<string, string>();
    private List<string> _partitions;
    private bool _bPartitionsBuilt;

    public SimpleGuidIdPartitionSplitter()
    {

    }

    public void BuildPartitions(int iPartCount)
    {
        BuildPartitionIndentifiers(iPartCount);
    }

    public string GetPartition(T item)
    {
        if (_bPartitionsBuilt == false)
        {
            throw new Exception("Partitions Not Built");
        }

        var partKey = item.Id.ToString().Substring(34, 2);
        return _partitionByKey[partKey];
    }

    public string GetPartition(Guid id)
    {
        if (_bPartitionsBuilt == false)
        {
            throw new Exception("Partitions Not Built");
        }

        var partKey = id.ToString().Substring(34, 2);
        return _partitionByKey[partKey];
    }

    #region Helpers
    private void BuildPartitionIndentifiers(int partitonCount)
    {
        var chars = new char[] { '0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9', 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f' }.ToList();
        var keys = new List<string>();

        for (int i = 0; i < chars.Count; i++)
        {
            var keyA = chars[i];
            for (int j = 0; j < chars.Count; j++)
            {
                var keyB = chars[j];
                keys.Add(string.Concat(keyA, keyB));
            }
        }


        var keySetMaxSize = Math.Max(1, (int)Math.Floor((double)keys.Count / ((double)partitonCount)));
        var keySets = new List<List<string>>();

        if (partitonCount > keys.Count)
        {
            partitonCount = keys.Count;
        }

        //Build the key sets
        var index = 0;
        while (index < keys.Count)
        {
            var keysSet = keys.Skip(index).Take(keySetMaxSize).ToList();
            keySets.Add(keysSet);
            index += keySetMaxSize;
        }

        //build the lookups and datatable for each key set
        _partitions = new List<string>();
        for (int i = 0; i < keySets.Count; i++)
        {
            var partitionName = String.Concat("subSet_", i);
            foreach (var key in keySets[i])
            {
                _partitionByKey[key] = partitionName;
            }
            _partitions.Add(partitionName);
        }

        _bPartitionsBuilt = true;
    }
    #endregion
}



internal static List<TestTableEntity> GenerateTableItems(int count)
        {
            var items = new List<TestTableEntity>();
            var random = new Random();

            for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
            {
                var itemId = Guid.NewGuid();

                items.Add(new TestTableEntity()
                {
                    Id = itemId,
                    TestGuid = Guid.NewGuid(),
                    RowKey = itemId.ToString(),
                    TestBool = true,
                    TestDateTime = DateTime.Now,
                    TestDouble = random.Next() * 1000000,
                    TestInt = random.Next(10000),
                    TestString = Guid.NewGuid().ToString(),
                });
            }

            var dupRowKeys = items.GroupBy(o => o.RowKey).Where(o => o.Count() > 1).Select(o => o.Key).ToList();
            if (dupRowKeys.Count > 0)
            {
                throw  new Exception("Dupicate Row Keys");
            }

            return items;
        }

and one more thing - your timing and how are framework was affected point to this http://blogs.msdn.com/b/windowsazurestorage/archive/2013/08/08/net-clients-encountering-port-exhaustion-after-installing-kb2750149-or-kb2805227.aspx

  • Thanks again! For a quick test, I read that blog and updated to storage library 2.0.6.1 and it has had no noticeable effect in my test. I will try out your code next. – Keith Murray Aug 9 '13 at 18:15
  • So after much more testing, I believe that I've reached the limit of the small Azure instances, which seem to max out at 2k ROPS when doing batch insertorreplace of 100, each batch into it's own partition. No amount of fiddling with maxConnections, thread counts, nagling or anything else suggested seems to push that much. Perhaps all of those come into play on a larger multi-core Azure instance. – Keith Murray Aug 9 '13 at 22:05
  • gotcha, in your case it could possibly related to the bandwidth available to the small instance... What happens to the code on a normal? I generally run this stuff on a large instance. – JTtheGeek Aug 9 '13 at 22:19
  • so, we ran our tests on different instance sizes and yes that makes a huge difference. at medium we get around 1200 writes per second, on extra large we get around 7200. We are looking at building a distributed read/write controller possibly using the dcache as the middle man. – JTtheGeek Aug 9 '13 at 22:39
  • 1
    Thanks for the confirmation and all of the answers. This has been very informative! Now I know where tables stand and what is required if we need that kind of performance. – Keith Murray Aug 9 '13 at 22:57

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