1

I have the following JSON example to represent a tree.

[
    {
        "label": "node1",
        "children": [
            {
                "label": "Human"
            },
            {
                "label": "Chimpanzee"
            }
        ]
    },
    {
        "label": "node2",
        "children": [
            {
                "label": "node3",
                "children": [
                    {
                        "label": "Rat"
                    },
                    {
                        "label": "Mouse"
                    }
                ]
            },
            {
                "label": "BigRat"
            }
        ]
    }
]

What I would like to do now, is the following: Given a list of labels (e.g. BigRat, Mouse), how can I delete the corresponding nodes in the JSON?

I just can't get my head around this.

Any help is much appreciated!

Thanks

4
  • Use a for.. in loop or Object.keys with a normal loop to iterate the elements of an object and a normal for loop to iterate arrays. Remove elements from objects by using delete or setting them to null - from arrays by using splice. Jul 31, 2013 at 8:01
  • 1
    I assume by the time you're doing this, you're not dealing with JSON (which is a textual serialization form), but rather an object graph in memory? Jul 31, 2013 at 8:02
  • 1
    You might want to remove the visualization of the nodes and not change the JSON itself... For that, showing your D3.js script would help us help you..
    – Joum
    Jul 31, 2013 at 8:23
  • 1
    On the other hand, if you actually want to edit your JSON, this has nothing to do with d3.js, so you should clear that out for everyone...
    – Joum
    Jul 31, 2013 at 8:36

1 Answer 1

9

Since your tree is essentially an object array, where each object has a label and an optional child array, what you need to prune are array elements, either in the main tree array or in one of it's branches.

You definitely do not want to use delete to delete array elements, since that leaves you with a sparse array. Instead, you should splice out array elements.

You should, on the other hand, use delete to remove object properties, like children once they're empty. Here's the code I would use:

function prune(array, label) {
    for (var i = 0; i < array.length; ++i) {
        var obj = array[i];
        if (obj.label === label) {
            // splice out 1 element starting at position i
            array.splice(i, 1);
            return true;
        }
        if (obj.children) {
            if (prune(obj.children, label)) {
                if (obj.children.length === 0) {
                    // delete children property when empty
                    delete obj.children;

                    // or, to delete this parent altogether
                    // as a result of it having no more children
                    // do this instead
                    array.splice(i, 1);
                }
                return true;
            }
        }
    }
}

Now assuming your tree was called tree and the label you wanted pruned was node3, you would call prune like so:

var wasItPruned = prune(tree, "node3");
2
  • it works, but how do you delete internal nodes. In case you deleted two leaf nodes, you want to delete the corresponding parent node as well.
    – fabsta
    Aug 1, 2013 at 13:10
  • edited code to demonstrate the alternative of deleting the parent as a result of it having no more children
    – Ray Waldin
    Aug 1, 2013 at 15:09

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