1

I have an xml document like this:

<Catalogs>
    <Catalog>
        <Code>x</Code>
        <Name>Ox</Name>
        <Categories>
            <Category>
                <Id>9245</Id>
                <Name>a</Name>
                <Category>
                    <Id>9247</Id>
                    <Name>x</Name>
                </Category>
            </Category>
            <Category>
                <Id>9250</Id>
                <Name>x</Name>
                <Category>
                    <Id>9252</Id>
                    <Name>x</Name>
                </Category>
                <Category>
                    <Id>9258</Id>
                    <Name>x</Name>
                    <Category>
                        <Id>9260</Id>
                        <Name>x</Name>
                    </Category>
                    <Category>
                        <Id>9261</Id>
                        <Name>x</Name>
                    </Category>
                    <Category>
                        <Id>9261</Id>
                        <Name>x</Name>
                    </Category>
                </Category>
            </Category>
            <Category>
                <Id>9251</Id>
                <Name>x</Name>
                <Category>
                    <Id>9253</Id>
                    <Name>x</Name>
                </Category>
            </Category>
        </Categories>
    </Catalog>
</Catalogs>

I would like to wrap each subset of Category-tags into a collection tag (Categories). The problem here is that this is a recursive tree, and the depth of the tree is unknown.

I tried to use an xslt transformation for this, but haven't succeeded yet. My attempt

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">

<xsl:template match="Category">
  <Categories><xsl:apply-templates select="Category"/></Categories>
</xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

just replaces all children with an empty Categories tag.

Sample output should be something like this:

<Catalogs>
    <Catalog>
        <Code>x</Code>
        <Name>Ox</Name>
        <Categories>
            <Category>
                <Id>9245</Id>
                <Name>a</Name>
                <Categories>
                    <Category>
                        <Id>9247</Id>
                        <Name>x</Name>
                    </Category>
                </Categories>
            </Category>
            <Category>
                <Id>9250</Id>
                <Name>x</Name>
                <Categories>
                    <Category>
                        <Id>9252</Id>
                        <Name>x</Name>
                    </Category>
                    <Category>
                        <Id>9258</Id>
                        <Name>x</Name>
                        <Categories>
                            <Category>
                                <Id>9260</Id>
                                <Name>x</Name>
                            </Category>
                            <Category>
                                <Id>9261</Id>
                                <Name>x</Name>
                            </Category>
                            <Category>
                                <Id>9261</Id>
                                <Name>x</Name>
                            </Category>
                        </Categories>
                    </Category>
                </Categories>
            </Category>
            <Category>
                <Id>9251</Id>
                <Name>x</Name>
                <Categories>
                    <Category>
                        <Id>9253</Id>
                        <Name>x</Name>
                    </Category>
                </Categories>
            </Category>
        </Categories>
    </Catalog>
</Catalogs>

Any pointers (or full solutions) would be appreciated.

4

To start with, you should be building your XSLT on top of the XSLT identity template, which will copy all nodes in your XML for which you don't have explicit matching templates

<xsl:template match="@*|node()">
   <xsl:copy>
     <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()"/>
   </xsl:copy>
</xsl:template>

Without this, XSLT's built-in templates will kick-in, and just output the text of any element it finds.

The other problem with your XSLT, is that when you match a Category element, you are doing <xsl:apply-templates select="Category"/> which means you are only telling XSLT to look for any Category elements that are children of the current element.

One approach you could be taking is to have your template match the parent of any Category element (excluding Categories elements already)

<xsl:template match="*[not(self::Categories)][Category]">

Then, within this, you can copy the element, and insert a Categories element within it to contain all the Category elements

<xsl:copy>
  <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()[not(self::Category)]"/>
  <Categories>
    <xsl:apply-templates select="Category"/>
  </Categories>
</xsl:copy>

Here is the full XSLT in this case

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
  <xsl:output method="xml" indent="yes"/>

  <xsl:template match="*[not(self::Categories)][Category]">
    <xsl:copy>
      <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()[not(self::Category)]"/>
      <Categories>
        <xsl:apply-templates select="Category"/>
      </Categories>
    </xsl:copy>
  </xsl:template>

  <xsl:template match="@*|node()">
    <xsl:copy>
      <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()"/>
    </xsl:copy>
  </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

A disadvantage of this approach though is that if you any elements that occur after the Category within a parent, these will be moved to before the Categories element that gets created.

Another approach would be match the first occurence of a Category element within a parent, and then copy that element and all its following siblings

Try this XSLT too

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
  <xsl:output method="xml" indent="yes"/>

  <xsl:template match="Category[1]">
    <Categories>
      <xsl:apply-templates select="self::*|following-sibling::Category" mode="categories"/>
    </Categories>
  </xsl:template>

  <xsl:template match="Category" mode="categories">
    <xsl:call-template name="identity" />
  </xsl:template>

  <xsl:template match="Category" />

  <xsl:template match="@*|node()" name="identity">
    <xsl:copy>
      <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()"/>
    </xsl:copy>
  </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

Two things to note about this approach. Firstly, XSLT will always give priority to the more specific template match, when looking for templates that match a node. Thus "Category[1]" will be get used over "Category" for the first child Category element.

Secondly, note the use of mode here, because otherwise you would have two templates that would match "Category" with the same priority, which is not allowed.

  • Thanks for not only 2 (!) working solutions, but for some extra explanations as well. Seems I need to learn a bit more about xslt – jonathan.meesschaert Aug 1 '13 at 8:31

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