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I need to apply below permission policies to my files under www folder

664 to all files in www recursively, 755 to all directories under www recursively

I tried

find . -type f -exec chmod 644 {} ; 
find . -type d -exec chmod 755 {} ; 

But always getting error

find: missing argument to `-exec'

What is the solution?

0
9

Backslash before semi-colon (or quotes around it):

find . -type f -exec chmod 644 {} \;
find . -type d -exec chmod 755 {} \;

The shell sees the semi-colon you typed as the end of the command and does not pass it to find, which then complains that it is missing.

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  • An alternate that I use because I can never remember the -exec syntax is: <code>find . -type f | xargs chmod 0644</code>. – DanM Nov 25 '09 at 13:01
  • Me too, Dan. It also has the potential to execute fewer commands. – Jonathan Leffler Nov 25 '09 at 13:33
  • It is important to remember that the 'built-in' notation works correctly for file names with blanks and other odd characters in them. If you have paths with blanks in them and you are using xargs, use the find option -print0 and the xargs option -0. – Jonathan Leffler Nov 25 '09 at 18:04
2

Use backslash before ';'

find . -type f -exec chmod 644 {} \; 
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  • Also you can find file and directoryes at the same time find . -type f -or -type d – Staseg Nov 25 '09 at 12:25
  • But since the files need different permissions from the directories, the overall expression has to be rather complex then: find . \( -type f -exec chmod 644 {} \; \) -o \( -type d -exec chmod 755 {} \; \). You might be able to avoid the parentheses; they are pretty much guaranteed to work, though. – Jonathan Leffler Nov 25 '09 at 12:34

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