62

I was asked to write my own implementation to remove duplicated values in an array. Here is what I have created. But after tests with 1,000,000 elements it took very long time to finish. Is there something that I can do to improve my algorithm or any bugs to remove ?

I need to write my own implementation - not to use Set, HashSet etc. Or any other tools such as iterators. Simply an array to remove duplicates.

public static int[] removeDuplicates(int[] arr) {

    int end = arr.length;

    for (int i = 0; i < end; i++) {
        for (int j = i + 1; j < end; j++) {
            if (arr[i] == arr[j]) {                  
                int shiftLeft = j;
                for (int k = j+1; k < end; k++, shiftLeft++) {
                    arr[shiftLeft] = arr[k];
                }
                end--;
                j--;
            }
        }
    }

    int[] whitelist = new int[end];
    for(int i = 0; i < end; i++){
        whitelist[i] = arr[i];
    }
    return whitelist;
}
16
  • 6
    What restrictions are placed on you? Can you sort? You can certainly improve on this O(n^3) implementation. This algorithm should be O(nln(n)) in the optimal case. Jul 31, 2013 at 9:52
  • 10
    Well yes, you've got an O(n^3) algorithm... that doesn't sound like a good idea to me.
    – Jon Skeet
    Jul 31, 2013 at 9:52
  • 2
    you can use Set<Integer> ?
    – sanbhat
    Jul 31, 2013 at 9:52
  • 11
    You asked this in Codereview, too. There is an answer, too.
    – user1907906
    Jul 31, 2013 at 9:53
  • 3
    Well, you already have two answers in the code review forum
    – morgano
    Jul 31, 2013 at 10:02

48 Answers 48

44

you can take the help of Set collection

int end = arr.length;
Set<Integer> set = new HashSet<Integer>();

for(int i = 0; i < end; i++){
  set.add(arr[i]);
}

now if you will iterate through this set, it will contain only unique values. Iterating code is like this :

Iterator it = set.iterator();
while(it.hasNext()) {
  System.out.println(it.next());
}
6
  • 9
    I'm supposed to write my own implementation for this exercise. But thanks anyway.
    – ashur
    Jul 31, 2013 at 9:57
  • 13
    OP clearly says he wants to solve without Set. Please read the question before answering. Sep 14, 2018 at 3:32
  • 2
    I Came here to search for a method which is easy and understandable, for me it doesn't matter whether it's set or anything. Thank you so much for this great help Feb 18, 2019 at 8:34
  • 4
    @goyalshub1509, when I answered it was not written that he wants without set, so I answered like that. Feb 18, 2019 at 8:48
  • 1
    @AngadBansode read my answer prior to your comment please. May 21 at 11:54
26

If you are allowed to use Java 8 streams:

Arrays.stream(arr).distinct().toArray();
0
17

Note: I am assuming the array is sorted.

Code:

int[] input = new int[]{1, 1, 3, 7, 7, 8, 9, 9, 9, 10};
int current = input[0];
boolean found = false;

for (int i = 0; i < input.length; i++) {
    if (current == input[i] && !found) {
        found = true;
    } else if (current != input[i]) {
        System.out.print(" " + current);
        current = input[i];
        found = false;
    }
}
System.out.print(" " + current);

output:

  1 3 7 8 9 10
3
  • 24
    you are assuming the array is sorted so it will fail if the array has duplicates at random places or is unsorted. Apr 8, 2015 at 22:42
  • 4
    @kick Butowski well if array is sorted it can be done much simpler with XOR operation .see mine answer
    – M Sach
    Aug 24, 2016 at 13:20
  • assumes array is sorted
    – K.K
    May 24, 2017 at 22:26
12

Slight modification to the original code itself, by removing the innermost for loop.

public static int[] removeDuplicates(int[] arr){
    int end = arr.length;

    for (int i = 0; i < end; i++) {
        for (int j = i + 1; j < end; j++) {
            if (arr[i] == arr[j]) {                  
                /*int shiftLeft = j;
                for (int k = j+1; k < end; k++, shiftLeft++) {
                    arr[shiftLeft] = arr[k];
                }*/
                arr[j] = arr[end-1];
                end--;
                j--;
            }
        }
    }

    int[] whitelist = new int[end];
    /*for(int i = 0; i < end; i++){
        whitelist[i] = arr[i];
    }*/
    System.arraycopy(arr, 0, whitelist, 0, end);
    return whitelist;
}
8

There exists many solution of this problem.

  1. The sort approach

    • You sort your array and resolve only unique items
  2. The set approach

    • You declare a HashSet where you put all item then you have only unique ones.
  3. You create a boolean array that represent the items all ready returned, (this depend on your data in the array).

If you deal with large amount of data i would pick the 1. solution. As you do not allocate additional memory and sorting is quite fast. For small set of data the complexity would be n^2 but for large i will be n log n.

8

Since you can assume the range is between 0-1000 there is a very simple and efficient solution

//Throws an exception if values are not in the range of 0-1000
public static int[] removeDuplicates(int[] arr) {
    boolean[] set = new boolean[1001]; //values must default to false
    int totalItems = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; ++i) {
        if (!set[arr[i]]) {
            set[arr[i]] = true;
            totalItems++;
        }
    }

    int[] ret = new int[totalItems];
    int c = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < set.length; ++i) {
        if (set[i]) {
            ret[c++] = i;
        }
    }
    return ret;
}

This runs in linear time O(n). Caveat: the returned array is sorted so if that is illegal then this answer is invalid.

4
  • Your implementation is similar to Bucket Sort algorithm. Apr 8, 2015 at 22:47
  • 9
    == false and == true? Ever heard of ! ?
    – Clashsoft
    Apr 19, 2015 at 16:52
  • 2
    Why == true? facepalm Nov 6, 2015 at 10:11
  • why we are creating new array with totalItems, we can save memory using same array, below is code: int c = 0; for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) { if (set[arr[i]]) { arr[c++] = arr[i]; System.out.println(arr[i]); set[arr[i]] = false; } } Aug 21, 2016 at 5:01
8
class Demo 
{
    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        int a[]={3,2,1,4,2,1};
        System.out.print("Before Sorting:");
        for (int i=0;i<a.length; i++ )
        {
            System.out.print(a[i]+"\t");
        }
        System.out.print ("\nAfter Sorting:");
        //sorting the elements
        for(int i=0;i<a.length;i++)
        {
            for(int j=i;j<a.length;j++)
            {
                if(a[i]>a[j])
                {
                    int temp=a[i];
                    a[i]=a[j];
                    a[j]=temp;
                }

            }
        }

        //After sorting
        for(int i=0;i<a.length;i++)
        {
            System.out.print(a[i]+"\t");
        }
        System.out.print("\nAfter removing duplicates:");
        int b=0;
        a[b]=a[0];
        for(int i=0;i<a.length;i++)
        {
            if (a[b]!=a[i])
            {
                b++;
                a[b]=a[i];
            }
        }
        for (int i=0;i<=b;i++ )
        {
            System.out.print(a[i]+"\t");
        }
    }
}
  OUTPUT:Before Sortng:3 2 1 4 2 1 After Sorting:1 1 2 2 3 4 
                Removing Duplicates:1 2 3 4
2
  • 10
    Answers like these are much more helpful to the community if you explain a bit about what you've done.
    – Bmo
    Jun 18, 2014 at 13:05
  • Efficient removal of duplicates but not efficient sorting :-) Aug 9, 2017 at 6:53
7

Since this question is still getting a lot of attention, I decided to answer it by copying this answer from Code Review.SE:

You're following the same philosophy as the bubble sort, which is very, very, very slow. Have you tried this?:

  • Sort your unordered array with quicksort. Quicksort is much faster than bubble sort (I know, you are not sorting, but the algorithm you follow is almost the same as bubble sort to traverse the array).

  • Then start removing duplicates (repeated values will be next to each other). In a for loop you could have two indices: source and destination. (On each loop you copy source to destination unless they are the same, and increment both by 1). Every time you find a duplicate you increment source (and don't perform the copy). @morgano

2
5
import java.util.Arrays;

public class Practice {

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int a[] = { 1, 3, 3, 4, 2, 1, 5, 6, 7, 7, 8, 10 };
    Arrays.sort(a);
    int j = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < a.length - 1; i++) {
        if (a[i] != a[i + 1]) {
            a[j] = a[i];
            j++;
        }
    }
    a[j] = a[a.length - 1];
    for (int i = 0; i <= j; i++) {
        System.out.println(a[i]);
    }

}
}
**This is the most simplest way**
4

What if you create two boolean arrays: 1 for negative values and 1 for positive values and init it all on false.

Then you cycle thorugh the input array and lookup in the arrays if you've encoutered the value already. If not, you add it to the output array and mark it as already used.

1
  • I think this is the best approach... I would also try to use a biginteger instead of array of boolean (It is more efficient in memory use, but It is a little hard to understand because you will need to do bitwise operations) Aug 15, 2018 at 13:52
4
package com.pari.practice;

import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.Iterator;

import com.pari.sort.Sort;

public class RemoveDuplicates {

 /**
 * brute force- o(N square)
 * 
 * @param input
 * @return
 */
public static int[] removeDups(int[] input){
    boolean[] isSame = new boolean[input.length];
    int sameNums = 0;

    for( int i = 0; i < input.length; i++ ){
        for( int j = i+1; j < input.length; j++){
            if( input[j] == input[i] ){ //compare same
                isSame[j] = true;
                sameNums++;
            }
        }
    }

    //compact the array into the result.
    int[] result = new int[input.length-sameNums];
    int count = 0;
    for( int i = 0; i < input.length; i++ ){
        if( isSame[i] == true) {
            continue;
        }
        else{
            result[count] = input[i];
            count++;
        }
    }

    return result;
}

/**
 * set - o(N)
 * does not guarantee order of elements returned - set property
 * 
 * @param input
 * @return
 */
public static int[] removeDups1(int[] input){
    HashSet myset = new HashSet();

    for( int i = 0; i < input.length; i++ ){
        myset.add(input[i]);
    }

    //compact the array into the result.
    int[] result = new int[myset.size()];
    Iterator setitr = myset.iterator();
    int count = 0;
    while( setitr.hasNext() ){
        result[count] = (int) setitr.next();
        count++;
    }

return result;
}

/**
 * quicksort - o(Nlogn)
 * 
 * @param input
 * @return
 */
public static int[] removeDups2(int[] input){
    Sort st = new Sort();
    st.quickSort(input, 0, input.length-1); //input is sorted

    //compact the array into the result.
    int[] intermediateResult = new int[input.length];
    int count = 0;
    int prev = Integer.MIN_VALUE;
    for( int i = 0; i < input.length; i++ ){
        if( input[i] != prev ){
            intermediateResult[count] = input[i];
            count++;
        }
        prev = input[i];
    }

    int[] result = new int[count];
    System.arraycopy(intermediateResult, 0, result, 0, count);

    return result;
}


public static void printArray(int[] input){
    for( int i = 0; i < input.length; i++ ){
        System.out.print(input[i] + " ");
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args){
    int[] input = {5,6,8,0,1,2,5,9,11,0};
    RemoveDuplicates.printArray(RemoveDuplicates.removeDups(input));
    System.out.println();
    RemoveDuplicates.printArray(RemoveDuplicates.removeDups1(input));
    System.out.println();
    RemoveDuplicates.printArray(RemoveDuplicates.removeDups2(input));
}
}

Output: 5 6 8 0 1 2 9 11

0 1 2 5 6 8 9 11

0 1 2 5 6 8 9 11

I have just written the above code for trying out. thanks.

3
public static int[] removeDuplicates(int[] arr){
    HashSet<Integer> set = new HashSet<>();
    final int len = arr.length;
    //changed end to len
    for(int i = 0; i < len; i++){
        set.add(arr[i]);
    }

    int[] whitelist = new int[set.size()];
    int i = 0;
    for (Iterator<Integer> it = set.iterator(); it.hasNext();) {
        whitelist[i++] = it.next();
    }
    return whitelist;
}

Runs in O(N) time instead of your O(N^3) time

1
  • I guess this won't maintain the order of the array. You'd better use a Set-Implementation which does so.
    – MrD
    Jul 31, 2013 at 10:07
3

Not a big fun of updating user input, however considering your constraints...

public int[] removeDup(int[] nums) {
  Arrays.sort(nums);
  int x = 0;
  for (int i = 0; i < nums.length; i++) {
    if (i == 0 || nums[i] != nums[i - 1]) {
    nums[x++] = nums[i];
    }
  }
  return Arrays.copyOf(nums, x);
}

Array sort can be easily replaced with any nlog(n) algorithm.

2

This is simple way to sort the elements in the array

public class DublicatesRemove {
    public static void main(String args[]) throws Exception {

        BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
        System.out.println("enter size of the array");
        int l = Integer.parseInt(br.readLine());
        int[] a = new int[l];
        // insert elements in the array logic
        for (int i = 0; i < l; i++) 
        {
            System.out.println("enter a element");
            int el = Integer.parseInt(br.readLine());
            a[i] = el;
        }
        // sorting elements in the array logic
        for (int i = 0; i < l; i++) 
        {
            for (int j = 0; j < l - 1; j++) 
            {
                if (a[j] > a[j + 1])
                {
                    int temp = a[j];
                    a[j] = a[j + 1];
                    a[j + 1] = temp;
                }
            }
        }
        // remove duplicate elements logic
        int b = 0;
        a[b] = a[0];
        for (int i = 1; i < l; i++)
        {
            if (a[b] != a[i])
            {
                b++;
                a[b]=a[i];

            }

        }
        for(int i=0;i<=b;i++)
        {
            System.out.println(a[i]);
        }


    }
}
2

For a sorted Array, just check the next index:

//sorted data!
public static int[] distinct(int[] arr) {
    int[] temp = new int[arr.length];

    int count = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
        int current = arr[i];

        if(count > 0 )
            if(temp[count - 1] == current)
                continue;

        temp[count] = current;
        count++;
    }

    int[] whitelist = new int[count];
    System.arraycopy(temp, 0, whitelist, 0, count);

    return whitelist;
}
10
  • The code as it stands won't work because new int[] {}; is an empty array so you will get an ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException. More damming perhaps is that binary search only works on sorted data. You have not sorted the data. And once the data is sorted then the binary search is redundant. Jul 31, 2013 at 10:33
  • So other that u cant read, everything's ok? there is a note on the bottom of my answer(so basically u cant read?) + the comment from ashur states that the array can be sorted...so this is spam?
    – mc_fish
    Jul 31, 2013 at 11:33
  • ps sorted data = unique data? in what universe? the only other option would be to check the index+1 item and that is the only part of your comment that has any sense
    – mc_fish
    Jul 31, 2013 at 11:39
  • Sorry, I guess I misunderstood. I think you need to set the value int[] to new int[arr.lenght] as otherwise the code won't work. And you need to add that the array must be already sorted. All the OP said was that you can sort the data not that it is already sorted. I still don't think this answer is correct. And as for sort == unqiue, that is not what I said. All I said was that if the data is sorted then you can find unique values without binary search as they are, by definition, adjacent - you therefore don't need to go looking for them. Jul 31, 2013 at 11:50
  • yeah your right on the binary search part, but either way the data needs to be sorted...so an index+1 would be the best idea
    – mc_fish
    Jul 31, 2013 at 11:53
1

You need to sort your array then then loop and remove duplicates. As you cannot use other tools you need to write be code yourself.

You can easily find examples of quicksort in Java on the internet (on which this example is based).

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    final int[] original = new int[]{1, 1, 2, 8, 9, 8, 4, 7, 4, 9, 1};
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(original));
    quicksort(original);
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(original));
    final int[] unqiue = new int[original.length];
    int prev = original[0];
    unqiue[0] = prev;
    int count = 1;
    for (int i = 1; i < original.length; ++i) {
        if (original[i] != prev) {
            unqiue[count++] = original[i];
        }
        prev = original[i];
    }
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(unqiue));
    final int[] compressed = new int[count];
    System.arraycopy(unqiue, 0, compressed, 0, count);
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(compressed));
}

private static void quicksort(final int[] values) {
    if (values.length == 0) {
        return;
    }
    quicksort(values, 0, values.length - 1);
}

private static void quicksort(final int[] values, final int low, final int high) {
    int i = low, j = high;
    int pivot = values[low + (high - low) / 2];
    while (i <= j) {
        while (values[i] < pivot) {
            i++;
        }
        while (values[j] > pivot) {
            j--;
        }
        if (i <= j) {
            swap(values, i, j);
            i++;
            j--;
        }
    }
    if (low < j) {
        quicksort(values, low, j);
    }
    if (i < high) {
        quicksort(values, i, high);
    }
}

private static void swap(final int[] values, final int i, final int j) {
    final int temp = values[i];
    values[i] = values[j];
    values[j] = temp;
}

So the process runs in 3 steps.

  1. Sort the array - O(nlgn)
  2. Remove duplicates - O(n)
  3. Compact the array - O(n)

So this improves significantly on your O(n^3) approach.

Output:

[1, 1, 2, 8, 9, 8, 4, 7, 4, 9, 1]
[1, 1, 1, 2, 4, 4, 7, 8, 8, 9, 9]
[1, 2, 4, 7, 8, 9, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
[1, 2, 4, 7, 8, 9]

EDIT

OP states values inside array doesn't matter really. But I can assume that range is between 0-1000. This is a classic case where an O(n) sort can be used.

We create an array of size range +1, in this case 1001. We then loop over the data and increment the values on each index corresponding to the datapoint.

We can then compact the resulting array, dropping values the have not been incremented. This makes the values unique as we ignore the count.

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    final int[] original = new int[]{1, 1, 2, 8, 9, 8, 4, 7, 4, 9, 1, 1000, 1000};
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(original));
    final int[] buckets = new int[1001];
    for (final int i : original) {
        buckets[i]++;
    }
    final int[] unique = new int[original.length];
    int count = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < buckets.length; ++i) {
        if (buckets[i] > 0) {
            unique[count++] = i;
        }
    }
    final int[] compressed = new int[count];
    System.arraycopy(unique, 0, compressed, 0, count);
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(compressed));
}

Output:

[1, 1, 2, 8, 9, 8, 4, 7, 4, 9, 1, 1000, 1000]
[1, 2, 4, 7, 8, 9, 1000]
4
  • bad idea... why find the max value? u need to go through all values? like i said in my comment earlier, sort it and check for the index+1 item
    – mc_fish
    Jul 31, 2013 at 11:42
  • @mc_fish The OP states the range of the values. That's why I suggested two approaches. One if the range is unknown and one if the range is known and small. Jul 31, 2013 at 11:56
  • yeah but he run a test at 1M? just saying
    – mc_fish
    Jul 31, 2013 at 12:03
  • 1
    Yes, 1M values but, to quote his comment, assume that range is between 0-1000. So the range is very small. Jul 31, 2013 at 12:12
1
public static void main(String args[]) {
    int[] intarray = {1,2,3,4,5,1,2,3,4,5,1,2,3,4,5};

    Set<Integer> set = new HashSet<Integer>();
    for(int i : intarray) {
        set.add(i);
    }

    Iterator<Integer> setitr = set.iterator();
    for(int pos=0; pos < intarray.length; pos ++) {
        if(pos < set.size()) {
            intarray[pos] =setitr.next();
        } else {
            intarray[pos]= 0;
        }
    }

    for(int i: intarray)
    System.out.println(i);
}
1
  • The output of this program is : 1 2 3 4 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Jan 8, 2015 at 15:51
1

I know this is kinda dead but I just wrote this for my own use. It's more or less the same as adding to a hashset and then pulling all the elements out of it. It should run in O(nlogn) worst case.

    public static int[] removeDuplicates(int[] numbers) {
    Entry[] entries = new Entry[numbers.length];
    int size = 0;
    for (int i = 0 ; i < numbers.length ; i++) {
        int nextVal = numbers[i];
        int index = nextVal % entries.length;
        Entry e = entries[index];
        if (e == null) {
            entries[index] = new Entry(nextVal);
            size++;
        } else {
            if(e.insert(nextVal)) {
                size++;
            }
        }
    }
    int[] result = new int[size];
    int index = 0;
    for (int i = 0 ; i < entries.length ; i++) {
        Entry current = entries[i];
        while (current != null) {
            result[i++] = current.value;
            current = current.next;
        }
    }
    return result;
}

public static class Entry {
    int value;
    Entry next;

    Entry(int value) {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public boolean insert(int newVal) {
        Entry current = this;
        Entry prev = null;
        while (current != null) {
            if (current.value == newVal) {
                return false;
            } else if(current.next != null) {
                prev = current;
                current = next;
            }
        }
        prev.next = new Entry(value);
        return true;
    }
}
1
int tempvar=0; //Variable for the final array without any duplicates
     int whilecount=0;    //variable for while loop
     while(whilecount<(nsprtable*2)-1) //nsprtable can be any number
     {
//to check whether the next value is idential in case of sorted array       
if(temparray[whilecount]!=temparray[whilecount+1])
        {
            finalarray[tempvar]=temparray[whilecount];
            tempvar++;
            whilecount=whilecount+1;
        }
        else if (temparray[whilecount]==temparray[whilecount+1])
        {
            finalarray[tempvar]=temparray[whilecount];
            tempvar++;
            whilecount=whilecount+2;
        }
     }

Hope this helps or solves the purpose.

1

How about this one, only for sorted array of numbers, to print array without duplicates, without using Set or other Collections, just Array:

 public static int[] removeDuplicates(int[] array) {
    int[] nums =new int[array.length];
    int addedNum = 0;
    int j=0;
    for(int i=0;i<array.length;i++) {
        if (addedNum != array[i]) {
        nums[j] = array[i];
        j++;
        addedNum = nums[j-1];
        }
    }
    return Arrays.copyOf(nums, j);
}

Array of 1040 duplicated numbers processed in 33020 nanoseconds(0.033020 millisec).

2
  • Excellent solution except for one small change. Please move array.length outside of for loop.
    – user4782805
    Apr 22, 2021 at 13:14
  • This is Quite optimized
    – subhashis
    Mar 19 at 14:20
1

Okay, so you cannot use Set or other collections. One solution I don't see here so far is one based on the use of a Bloom filter, which essentially is an array of bits, so perhaps that passes your requirements.

The Bloom filter is a lovely and very handy technique, fast and space-efficient, that can be used to do a quick check of the existence of an element in a set without storing the set itself or the elements. It has a (typically small) false positive rate, but no false negative rate. In other words, for your question, if a Bloom filter tells you that an element hasn't been seen so far, you can be sure it hasn't. But if it says that an element has been seen, you actually need to check. This still saves a lot of time if there aren't too many duplicates in your list (for those, there is no looping to do, except in the small probability case of a false positive --you typically chose this rate based on how much space you are willing to give to the Bloom filter (rule of thumb: less than 10 bits per unique element for a false positive rate of 1%).

There are many implementations of Bloom filters, see e.g. here or here, so I won't repeat that in this answer. Let us just assume the api described in that last reference, in particular, the description of put(E e):

true if the Bloom filter's bits changed as a result of this operation. If the bits changed, this is definitely the first time object has been added to the filter. If the bits haven't changed, this might be the first time object has been added to the filter. (...)

An implementation using such a Bloom filter would then be:

public static int[] removeDuplicates(int[] arr) {
    ArrayList<Integer> out = new ArrayList<>();
    int n = arr.length;
    BloomFilter<Integer> bf = new BloomFilter<>(...);  // decide how many bits and how many hash functions to use (compromise between space and false positive rate)

    for (int e : arr) {
        boolean might_contain = !bf.put(e);
        boolean found = false;
        if (might_contain) {
            // check if false positive
            for (int u : out) {
                if (u == e) {
                    found = true;
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
        if (!found) {
            out.add(e);
        }
    }
    return out.stream().mapToInt(i -> i).toArray();
}

Obviously, if you can alter the incoming array in place, then there is no need for an ArrayList: at the end, when you know the actual number of unique elements, just arraycopy() those.

1
 package javaa;

public class UniqueElementinAnArray 
{

 public static void main(String[] args) 
 {
    int[] a = {10,10,10,10,10,100};
    int[] output = new int[a.length];
    int count = 0;
    int num = 0;

    //Iterate over an array
    for(int i=0; i<a.length; i++)
    {
        num=a[i];
        boolean flag = check(output,num);
        if(flag==false)
        {
            output[count]=num;
            ++count;
        }

    }

    //print the all the elements from an array except zero's (0)
    for (int i : output) 
    {
        if(i!=0 )
            System.out.print(i+"  ");
    }

}

/***
 * If a next number from an array is already exists in unique array then return true else false
 * @param arr   Unique number array. Initially this array is an empty.
 * @param num   Number to be search in unique array. Whether it is duplicate or unique.
 * @return  true: If a number is already exists in an array else false 
 */
public static boolean check(int[] arr, int num)
{
    boolean flag = false;
    for(int i=0;i<arr.length; i++)
    {
        if(arr[i]==num)
        {
            flag = true;
            break;
        }
    }
    return flag;
}

}

1
public static int[] removeDuplicates(int[] arr) {

int end = arr.length;

 HashSet<Integer> set = new HashSet<Integer>(end);
    for(int i = 0 ; i < end ; i++){
        set.add(arr[i]);
    }
return set.toArray();
}
1

You can use an auxiliary array (temp) which in indexes are numbers of main array. So the time complexity will be liner and O(n). As we want to do it without using any library, we define another array (unique) to push non-duplicate elements:

var num = [2,4,9,4,1,2,24,12,4];
let temp = [];
let unique = [];
let j = 0;
for (let i = 0; i < num.length; i++){
  if (temp[num[i]] !== 1){
    temp[num[i]] = 1;
    unique[j++] = num[i];
  }
}
console.log(unique);

1

If you are looking to remove duplicates using the same array and also keeping the time complexity of O(n). Then this should do the trick. Also, would only work if the array is sorted.

function removeDuplicates_sorted(arr){

let j = 0; 

for(let x = 0; x < arr.length - 1; x++){
    
    if(arr[x] != arr[x + 1]){ 
        arr[j++] = arr[x];
    }
}

arr[j++] = arr[arr.length - 1];
arr.length = j;

return arr;

}

Here is for an unsorted array, its O(n) but uses more space complexity then the sorted.

function removeDuplicates_unsorted(arr){

let map = {};
let j = 0;

for(var numbers of arr){
    if(!map[numbers]){
        map[numbers] = 1;
        arr[j++] = numbers;
    }
}

arr.length = j;

return arr;

}

1

Note to other readers who desire to use the Set method of solving this problem: If original ordering must be preserved, do not use HashSet as in the top result. HashSet does not guarantee the preservation of the original order, so LinkedHashSet should be used instead-this keeps track of the order in which the elements were inserted into the set and returns them in that order.

1

This is an interview question.

public class Test4 {
public static void main(String[] args) {
     int a[] = {1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 6,6,6,6,6,66,7,65}; 
              int newlength =    lengthofarraywithoutduplicates(a);
              for(int i = 0 ; i < newlength ;i++) {
                  System.out.println(a[i]);
              }//for
}//main

private static int lengthofarraywithoutduplicates(int[] a) {
     int count = 1 ;
     for (int i = 1; i < a.length; i++) {
          int ch = a[i];
          if(ch != a[i-1]) {
              a[count++] = ch;
          }//if
    }//for
    return count;
    
}//fix

}//end1

But, it's always better to use Stream :

int[] a = {1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 6,6,6,6,6,66,7,65};
int[] array = Arrays.stream(a).distinct().toArray();
System.out.println(Arrays.toString(array));//[1, 2, 3, 6, 66, 7, 65]
0
public static void main(String[] args) {
        Integer[] intArray = { 1, 1, 1, 2, 4, 2, 3, 5, 3, 6, 7, 3, 4, 5 };
        Integer[] finalArray = removeDuplicates(intArray);
        System.err.println(Arrays.asList(finalArray));
    }

    private static Integer[] removeDuplicates(Integer[] intArray) {
        int count = 0;
        Integer[] interimArray = new Integer[intArray.length];
        for (int i = 0; i < intArray.length; i++) {
            boolean exists = false;
            for (int j = 0; j < interimArray.length; j++) {
                if (interimArray[j]!=null && interimArray[j] == intArray[i]) {
                    exists = true;
                }
            }
            if (!exists) {
                interimArray[count] = intArray[i];
                count++;
            }
        }
        final Integer[] finalArray = new Integer[count];
        System.arraycopy(interimArray, 0, finalArray, 0, count);
        return finalArray;
    }
0

I feel Android Killer's idea is great, but I just wondered if we can leverage HashMap. So I did a little experiment. And I found HashMap seems faster than HashSet.

Here is code:

    int[] input = new int[1000000];

    for (int i = 0; i < input.length; i++) {
        Random random = new Random();
        input[i] = random.nextInt(200000);
    }

    long startTime1 = new Date().getTime();
    System.out.println("Set start time:" + startTime1);

    Set<Integer> resultSet = new HashSet<Integer>();

    for (int i = 0; i < input.length; i++) {
        resultSet.add(input[i]);
    }

    long endTime1 = new Date().getTime();
    System.out.println("Set end time:"+ endTime1);
    System.out.println("result of set:" + (endTime1 - startTime1));     
    System.out.println("number of Set:" + resultSet.size() + "\n");

    long startTime2 = new Date().getTime();
    System.out.println("Map start time:" + startTime1);

    Map<Integer, Integer> resultMap = new HashMap<Integer, Integer>();

    for (int i = 0; i < input.length; i++) {
        if (!resultMap.containsKey(input[i]))
            resultMap.put(input[i], input[i]);
    }

    long endTime2 = new Date().getTime();
    System.out.println("Map end Time:" + endTime2);
    System.out.println("result of Map:" + (endTime2 - startTime2));
    System.out.println("number of Map:" + resultMap.size());

Here is result:

Set start time:1441960583837
Set end time:1441960583917
result of set:80
number of Set:198652

Map start time:1441960583837
Map end Time:1441960583983
result of Map:66
number of Map:198652
0

This is not using Set, Map, List or any extra collection, only two arrays:

package arrays.duplicates;

import java.lang.reflect.Array;
import java.util.Arrays;

public class ArrayDuplicatesRemover<T> {

    public static <T> T[] removeDuplicates(T[] input, Class<T> clazz) {
        T[] output = (T[]) Array.newInstance(clazz, 0);
        for (T t : input) {
            if (!inArray(t, output)) {
                output = Arrays.copyOf(output, output.length + 1);
                output[output.length - 1] = t;
            }
        }
        return output;
    }

    private static <T> boolean inArray(T search, T[] array) {
        for (T element : array) {
            if (element.equals(search)) {
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    }

}

And the main to test it

package arrays.duplicates;

import java.util.Arrays;

public class TestArrayDuplicates {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Integer[] array = {1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4};
        testArrayDuplicatesRemover(array);
    }

    private static void testArrayDuplicatesRemover(Integer[] array) {
        final Integer[] expectedResult = {1, 2, 3, 4};
        Integer[] arrayWithoutDuplicates = ArrayDuplicatesRemover.removeDuplicates(array, Integer.class);
        System.out.println("Array without duplicates is supposed to be: " + Arrays.toString(expectedResult));
        System.out.println("Array without duplicates currently is: " + Arrays.toString(arrayWithoutDuplicates));
        System.out.println("Is test passed ok?: " + (Arrays.equals(arrayWithoutDuplicates, expectedResult) ? "YES" : "NO"));
    }

}

And the output:

Array without duplicates is supposed to be: [1, 2, 3, 4]
Array without duplicates currently is: [1, 2, 3, 4]
Is test passed ok?: YES

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