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I have X amount of activity sensors connected to a server that inserts data to a database everytime a sensor is triggered. What I'm trying to do is create a web interface with a blue print of the facility (svg) and whenever a sensor is triggered, besides the db insert, I want it to show some sort of alert in my blue print. For that I need to keep an open connection to the server I think.

I was thinking of using web sockets, but it might be overkill since I only need to retrieve data from the server. But running an ajax call every second doesn't sound very efficient either. Are there any other alternatives?

Thank you

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    You have AJAX long polling, which will end up being almost as efficient as web-sockets in your case; assuming the sensors are not activated often. WebSockets aren't "overkill" I'd say, and AJAX requests wouldn't be too inefficient assuming a small number of users.
    – Matt
    Jul 31 '13 at 10:49
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    maybe signalr.net
    – Raidri
    Jul 31 '13 at 10:49
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    i also suggest signalr.net ..right now in beta but its too good ... Jul 31 '13 at 10:50
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    I think the question fits better in programmers.stackexchange.com Aug 10 '13 at 15:36
  • Did you check how much data you are sending? Actually test it
    – SheetJS
    Aug 10 '13 at 18:32
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+50

Some potential choices include:

  • WebSocket
  • Adobe® Flash® Socket
  • AJAX long polling
  • AJAX multipart streaming
  • Forever Iframe
  • JSONP Polling

Which actual transport you end up using will depend on the your requirements for browser support and what technology you are using on the server to handle these requests. The transport choice may also depend on your network topology - what types of load balancers you need to integrate with, proxies, etc.

There are many libraries available on both the client and server sides, many of which support more than one of these transports.

For example (not an exhaustive list):

  • socket.io for nodejs
    • WebSocket
    • Adobe® Flash® Socket
    • AJAX long polling
    • AJAX multipart streaming
    • Forever Iframe
    • JSONP Polling
  • SignalR for an asp/.net backend
    • WebSockets
    • Server-Sent Events
    • ForeverFrame
    • Long Polling
  • Atmosphere for a java backend
    • WebSockets
    • Server Side Events (SSE)
    • Long-Polling
    • Forever frame
    • JSONP

IMO - Websockets is NOT overkill for this type of problem and would lend itself nicely to this type of application.

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Without specifically discussing frameworks or knowing what is running in the backend of your server(s), we have a few options to consider for the frontend:

Websockets

Websockets are designed for bidirectional communication, although it is kind of shocking how many users are surfing the web in a browser that doesn't support websockets. I always recommend a fallback for this, such as the other methods listed below.

SSE

SSE is an HTML5 spec and is still shaky at best. Try scrolling on a page while when an SSE event fires... It may be a little easier on the backend, put it sometimes hangs on the client side since it runs inside the same thread that the DOM is running in.

Long Polling

Keeps your connection open. It doesn't scale well with PHP, but performs swimmingly with Python+Twisted on the backend, or Node.Js

Good Old Ajax

Keep your requests small, and you still have a scalable solution. Yes, a full GET request is the most expensive, but is supported in just about every browser rolled out the past ten years. It is also worth noting that GET requests are easy to scale horizontally with more hardware.

In a perfect world:

You would break up your application into a few components, operating behind a reverse proxy such as Nginx. Then use Node.Js + Socket.IO handle the realtime aspects of your app.

Another option would be to use small Ajax requests, and offer websocket support for the browsers that support it. This is advice specifically for PHP in the backend.

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WebSocket is certainly not overkill. On the contrary. With websockets, you have a bi-directional communication channel; this means, that the server can initiate communication whenever it seems fit (e.g. when sensor data changes).

In a previous project, I have used node.js together with socket.io, to monitor 50+ sensors. Data was updated in real-time in a browser. The data was visualized using smoothie.js. Whenever a sensor value was updated, it was communicated to the browser. Some sensors only updated once a minute, others once a second, ... Polling would have been overkill, because it would retrieve all data for all sensors, even from those that were not updated yet.

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I had a similar problem and did a lot of research on this. As I understand it, there are three main options:

  1. Short polling: Have an endpoint that your javascript client pings every second. This is the worst option, because the pings add latency up to one second to your communication, and depending on how you implement, the endpoint could query the database every second, adding unnecessary overhead.
  2. Long polling: Have an endpoint that your javascript client pings that holds the connection until a) the event occurs or b) the connection times out. If the endpoint returns a response, the client gets the event information. If the endpoint does not return a response, no event has occurred, and the client sends a new request. This is a good option because the events can immediately trigger the response to the client, assuming you have an asynchronous interprocess communication layer (like 0MQ) to send the message without any sort of polling.
  3. Websocket: Have your javascript client connect to a websocket server, which will send a message to your client immediately upon the event trigger.

I think a websocket is your best option, because it accommodates immediate communication of the event without all the request/response overhead. And most importantly, this is exactly what websockets are designed to do! As such, you will probably have to write the least amount of custom code with this solution.

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There are two great commercial services that might work for you.

  • Firebase - a javascript hierarchical database and realtime messaging/ synchronization platform, uses websockets and has other fallbacks

  • PubNub - a real time message passing and queue system, uses websockets

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  • PubNub actually does not just use web sockets. PubNub is protocol independent and uses the best transport depending on the situation. Disclosure I work for PubNub
    – sharpper
    Aug 14 '13 at 18:58

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