4

I have the following simple JavaScript "class":

function Person(params) 
{
    this.name = params.name;
}
Person.prototype.SayHi = function()
{
    alert(this.name + " says hi");
}

This works as expected when I run it in place. Running the following code gives me a popup that says "Alice says hi":

var alice = new Person({name:"Alice"});
alice.SayHi();

But when I try to assign it to a button event, it won't work:

$("#AliceOnClick").on("click", alice.SayHi);
$("#BobOnClick").on("click", bob.SayHi);

It appears that the SayHi function gets called, but the name field is null.

Minimal working example:

http://jsfiddle.net/AKHsc/1/

What am I doing wrong?

5

Just run it in an anonymous function to invoke it. Since you're calling a method on the object, you need parenthesis.

$(function(){
    $("#AliceOnClick").on("click", function() {
        alice.SayHi();
    });
    $("#BobOnClick").on("click", function() {
        bob.SayHi();
    });
});

Working Fiddle here.

13

jQuery sets the receiver of the event handler to the target element, so that you can conveniently do something like $(this).hide().

You can use e.g. $.proxy to work around it:

$(function(){
    $("#AliceOnClick").on("click", $.proxy(alice.SayHi, alice));
    $("#BobOnClick").on("click", $.proxy(bob.SayHi, bob));
});
  • Indeed. Event listener (both native JavaScript and jQuery) execute the event handler in the context of the element being clicked. Effectively the same as setting the first parameter of Function.prototype.apply to the DOM element. See: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… – Swivel Aug 1 '13 at 17:59
  • To elaborate on my comment above, basically the context is what this is set to. So, in using the Function.prototype.apply method, you can determine what the this variable is for that specific execution. This can be illustrated further with the following: function sayHi(){ alert(this.name + "says Hi"; }; sayHi.apply(alice); sayHi.apply(bob); – Swivel Aug 1 '13 at 18:04
1

So, you call the function without invoking it through instance, and the javascript doesn't maintain a link between the instance object and the functions, just pass the instance object to the function.

function Person(params) 
{
    this.name = params.name;
}
// version 1
Person.prototype.SayHi = function(who)
{
    return function() {
        alert(who.name + " says hi");
    }
}
// version 2, with `bind` method supported
Person.prototype.SayHi = function () {
    return function () {
        alert(this.name + " says hi");
    }.bind(this);
}
// version 3
Person.prototype.SayHi = function () {
    var who = this;
    return function () {
        alert(who.name + " says hi");
    }
}

alice = new Person({
    name: "Alice"
});
bob = new Person({
    name: "Bob"
});

$(function(){
    $("#AliceOnClick").on("click", alice.SayHi()));
    $("#BobOnClick").on("click", bob.SayHi());
    // $("#AliceOnClick").on("click", alice.SayHi(alice));
    //$("#BobOnClick").on("click", bob.SayHi(bob));
});
  • In your code you don't need the who parameter - the instances are available as this in the SayHi method that returns the handler. – Bergi Aug 1 '13 at 19:05
  • @Bergi I would double check that. Would not the this context be the owner of the element that fired the event? – eggmatters Jun 10 '15 at 16:37
  • @eggmatters: I mean var who = this; instead of taking it as a parameter to function SayHi(who) – Bergi Jun 10 '15 at 16:58
  • yes that's correct, who = this is needed. Towry has provided some excellent examples here. I completely forgot about bind. – eggmatters Jun 11 '15 at 17:19

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