68

I need a query to see if a table already has any indexes on it.

2

10 Answers 10

96

On SQL Server, this will list all the indexes for a specified table:

select * from sys.indexes
where object_id = (select object_id from sys.objects where name = 'MYTABLE')

This query will list all tables without an index:

SELECT name
FROM sys.tables 
WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(object_id,'IsIndexed') = 0

And this is an interesting MSDN FAQ on a related subject:
Querying the SQL Server System Catalog FAQ

3
  • 4
    How do I see which columns these indexes have been placed on ? Dec 13 '13 at 21:10
  • 1
    Should be noted the top query will fail if the table has more than one index, Replace object_id = (select with object_id IN (select if you need to see the information about the indices, or just want the query to complete without error.
    – Tor
    Jan 10 '17 at 16:17
  • This answer should be replaced with @Tor's answer IMO.
    – rsmith54
    Jun 28 '21 at 23:52
31

If you're using MySQL you can run SHOW KEYS FROM table or SHOW INDEXES FROM table

1
  • so sorry for not telling the environment. Its SQL Server 2008
    – sine
    Nov 25 '09 at 23:43
17

If you just need the indexed columns EXEC sp_helpindex 'TABLE_NAME'

8

Simply you can find index name and column names of a particular table using below command

SP_HELPINDEX 'tablename'

It work's for me

1
  • Simple and the best!
    – Yoda
    18 hours ago
7

Most modern RDBMSs support the INFORMATION_SCHEMA schema. If yours supports that, then you want either INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS or INFORMATION_SCHEMA.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE, or maybe both.

To see if yours supports it is as simple as running

select count(*) from INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS

EDIT: SQL Server does have INFORMATION_SCHEMA, and it's easier to use than their vendor-specific tables, so just go with it.

1
  • 4
    As the name suggests, the ANSI standard view, INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS only shows constraints. While some constraints are indexes not all indexes are constraints. This view won’t show regular indexes: it only displays CONSTRAINT_TYPEs of UNIQUE, PRIMARY KEY, FOREIGN KEY or CHECK. See the relevant section from “SQL-99 Complete, Really” Aug 6 '14 at 12:56
4

Here is what I used for TSQL which took care of the problem that my table name could contain the schema name and possibly the database name:

DECLARE @THETABLE varchar(100);
SET @THETABLE = 'theschema.thetable';
select i.*
  from sys.indexes i
 where i.object_id = OBJECT_ID(@THETABLE)
   and i.name is not NULL;

The use case for this is that I wanted the list of indexes for a named table so I could write a procedure that would dynamically compress all indexes on a table.

3

On Oracle:

  • Determine all indexes on table:

    SELECT index_name 
     FROM user_indexes
     WHERE table_name = :table
    
  • Determine columns indexes and columns on index:

    SELECT index_name
         , column_position
         , column_name
      FROM user_ind_columns
     WHERE table_name = :table
     ORDER BY index_name, column_order
    

References:

2

First you check your table id (aka object_id)

SELECT * FROM sys.objects WHERE type = 'U' ORDER BY name

then you can get the column's names. For example assuming you obtained from previous query the number 4 as object_id

SELECT c.name
FROM sys.index_columns ic
INNER JOIN sys.columns c ON  c.column_id = ic.column_id
WHERE ic.object_id = 4 
AND c.object_id = 4
1

Created a stored procedure to list indexes for a table in database in SQL Server

create procedure _ListIndexes(@tableName nvarchar(200))
as
begin
/*
exec _ListIndexes '<YOUR TABLE NAME>'
*/
SELECT DB_NAME(DB_ID()) as DBName,SCH.name + '.' + TBL.name AS TableName,IDX.name as IndexName, IDX.type_desc AS IndexType,COL.Name as ColumnName,IC.*
    FROM sys.tables AS TBL 
         INNER JOIN sys.schemas AS SCH ON TBL.schema_id = SCH.schema_id 
         INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS IDX ON TBL.object_id = IDX.object_id 
         INNER JOIN sys.index_columns IC ON  IDX.object_id = IC.object_id and IDX.index_id = IC.index_id 
         INNER JOIN sys.columns COL ON ic.object_id = COL.object_id and IC.column_id = COL.column_id 
        where TBL.name = @tableName
    ORDER BY TableName,IDX.name

end
-1

check this as well This gives an overview of associated constraints across a database. Please also include facilitating where condition with table name of interest so gives information faster.

   select 
a.TABLE_CATALOG as DB_name,a.TABLE_SCHEMA as tbl_schema, a.TABLE_NAME as tbl_name,a. CONSTRAINT_NAME as constraint_name,b.CONSTRAINT_TYPE
 from INFORMATION_SCHEMA.CONSTRAINT_COLUMN_USAGE a
join INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS b on
 a.CONSTRAINT_NAME=b.CONSTRAINT_NAME

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